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  1. Yesterday
  2. Hoodoo Man

    Wildflowers (the album) Opinion

    Its funny to me reading they were labeled a stoner band as I seem to recall some nonsense about Tom trying to be more like Pearl Jam / alt rock in the 2000 time frame. I think it was the April 95 show at the "real'/ original Boston Garden, right before it was being torn down, I noticed the crowd skewed much younger that the crowd seemed much younger (Tons of people in their 20's with fewer older people) than any of the prior shows I had been to (87-91). After that it seemed to skew back to a more normal distribution of young and old with me somewhere in the middle of the bell shape curve... I'm not a stoner but I love to this day when Tom does a story like in Gloria or Spike with his patter and working with the crowd... One of my favorite versions of Mary Jane's Last Dance is from the 1/12/97 Fillmore show where there is an extended jam guitar riff about 4 min into the song with a lot of distortion. Wildflowers for me, shows a natural progression form FMF and ITGWO with Tom and Mike growing as a songwriter and collaborators and Tom becoming a legendary song writer taping into deep imagery like Crawling Back To You - 'Indian in a bar room fight' and progressing as such into STO (heart so big/Walls) even a throw away like California or Cabin down below seems to be better written than a lot of his mid-80s stuff. - Dont get me wrong DTT was amazing songwriting but Let Me up I had enough was a hot mess. Echo was another underappreciated masterpiece - Room at the Top, Swinging and Echo; Tom manged to tell an amazing story in 4 min or so something few songwriters can accomplish. The album cycle from Wildflowers forward was for sure to my mind an evolution and did not strike me as an attempt to lure in stoners or flirt with that crowd. I just looked and Jerry passed away in 95 (which in reading the above had occurred to me that maybe they were trying to appeal to the Deadheads in the wake of the loss of him but nope.) I can see the 420 vibe in a few songs, but I think Tom was far too serious and frankly depressed when he wrote this album to make any concision overtures in that direction.
  3. TheSameOldDrew

    Wildflowers (the album) Opinion

    Wow, I missed this! I guess it answers my question regarding the live jams and such; though...it brings up a new question which is, have you listened to live shows from later tours? Or was that it for live TPATH for you...? I listen to some of the later live TPATH shows; a lot of it has to do with how well recorded they are, and whether Steve's repetitive bass drum is overpowering the recording. I like the Minneapolis 1999 show from the pre-FM radio discs, the song selection isn't great IMO - though I do like their version of "Walls" with the live cello player, I think the only time they had one for that song - as it's very clear and Steve's drums aren't too overwhelming. I also like the 2006 Gainesville show ok, for many of the same reasons, and I feel the Steve had learned to use cymbals more by then, and wasn't going so heavy on the bass drum, at least at that point. Also I liked the HC album, which to me (in the Special Edition format) was the 2nd best TP/TPATH album post ITGWO (the top album of that period for me being HE), and they had a few songs from that album on the 2006 tour. For the same reason I like a few of the recordings from the 2014 tour, if well recorded and if the recording isn't overpowered by the bass drumming. The reason I stopped going to the shows included that I'd already seen them when they were at their best (i.e. while Stan was still a member), and if it turned out I would be positioned where Steve's bass drumming would overpower the songs (much more likely than not, in any particular seat) that would pretty much ruin the show for me. And overall I found it depressing that they just weren't what they once had been, sorely lacking without Stan's creative drums and backing vocals, and not being able to clearly hear the bass guitar (and some other things) over Steve's drumming. So - I realize that some here think their "peak period" was more in the post-Stan era, and that's fine. I'm perfectly happy to have not seen them live in the 21st century, but as I said I'm glad to have some of the select live shows from after 2000 if they meet the criteria I favor.
  4. TheSameOldDrew

    Wildflowers (the album) Opinion

    Regarding the whole "stoner band" thing, that's something I read from a professional music critic (I forget where) probably around 1999-2001. I was surprised since I hadn't thought of them in that way during the pre-Wildflowers era, and I still didn't really see them that way. But it got me to thinking about whether the band had changed. Certainly the new fans were embracing the "stoner band" vibe. And TP himself was making far more pot references than before, kind of embracing the experience and perhaps welcoming the new fans in that way. How one defines "stoner band" or "stoner rock" is largely subjective. I really hadn't given it any thought until the mid/late 1990's. According to Wikipedia (which itself is subject to the whims of the writer) "stoner rock" is "typically slow-to-mid tempo and features a heavily distorted, groove-laden bass-heavy sound, melodic vocals, and "retro" production". The WF album and later weren't distorted, but otherwise they might fit that description. Furthermore I would add "mellow", "melancholy", and "repetitive" to either "stoner music", or TPATH music of that era, or both. Frankly it all made sense to me with those descriptions, because the music and lyrics of WF and the other Rick Rubin produced albums greatly bored me. But I thought perhaps under certain chemical influence, such music might sound good to the listener. However, I've seen that many people like those albums who are not under any chemical influence, so for the most part I'll have to chalk it up to my simply not liking the music from that period very much. I should also point out that I do like a lot of music that is called "psychedelic" or claims to be influenced by LSD or other hallucinogens, even though I personally don't care to screw up my brain by taking those substances. I always like the psychedelic period of The Beatles such as the "Magical Mystery Tour" album (US version). And I like a lot of the other 1960's "psychedelic" music. I'm trying to make a distinction between that and the plodding, repetitive, bass-heavy "stoner music", but I feel that's not a commonly accepted distinction, so I can understand why people would feel my thoughts there are unfounded. I do feel that the change of drummers was not coincidental to the change in music. I found Stan's drumming to be very creative and felt that Stan had a great "feel" for the music, both in the studio and in concert. While the song itself is probably worthy of an entire subject, I even felt that Stan's drumming on "Insider" added greatly to that song. Even though TP himself later said he felt it would have been better without the drumming, and Stan seemed to agree with that as well. But I don't, to me the song isn't nearly as good without the drumming. But it's not just "some" drumming. If Steve had played his usual "boom boom boom" one dimensional thing for "Insider", it would have detracted from the song. Of course that's yet another topic, was Steve as uncreative as his drumming implied, or was he being held back by TP telling him not to be creative? Hard to say, since at times Steve would let loose, one example being "I Don't Wanna Fight". Dreadful song (sorry Mike) but Steve, obviously not being held back by TP, did some of his more enthusiastic drumming there. He's still no Stan, but not the bore-fest he'd been on nearly every song until the "Hypnotic Eye" album. At any rate, even though I agree that the Grateful Dead does not sound a lot like TPATH circa 1995-2001, and certainly the GD drumming is much different - being much more percussion oriented - I do wonder if the slow, plodding, repetitive, bass-heavy drumming that Steve did live and on the albums, was part of TP's vision for - for lack of a better name - stoner music. Names aside, I didn't like the changes at either the live shows or on the albums, at that point. But some people love the albums, love the changes, and that's great. Not everyone is going to love the same things, and certainly it's boring to repeat the same music, so this did give TP/TPATH a new direction. I was happy through all the changes they'd done before, from the beginning with varied songs such as "American Girl". "Breakdown", "Luna", "Mystery Man", "Listen to Her Heart", "Magnolia", "Hurt", etc. - through the harder rocking "Damn The Torpedoes", the country-ish "Louisiana Rain" (and "Trailer", "Keeping Me Alive" etc.) , the jangly "Hard Promises", the horn-laded and psychedelic "Southern Accents" album, the various changes through "Let Me Up", "FMF" and "ITGWO". I loved all of those styles, with those line-ups (in the case of ITGWO, I felt the songs were great, though the production stifled the album). My enjoyment was simply greatly curtailed at the point of WF-Echo and never fully returned, so that's my take essentially on the WF album. Which coincided with the change in music, change in lyrics, and change in drummers. One more thing about the WF album - I know this will be heresy to a lot of people - but I found the lyrics were not up to TP's usual standards, and this was especially disappointing after the great lyrics on ITGWO (the album that is, the song I find to be mostly silly). Even if I could accept the topics as being worthy of writing about (and I don't particularly care about the "Cabin Down Below" or so many "woe is me" songs), it seems to me the lyrics could have been better if TP had spent more time working on them. I later read a comment from TP saying that he used to work long and hard at getting the lyrics right, but now he just would stick with the first draft of them, or something like that. I think he said he felt that the first draft was freshest and therefore best, or words to that degree. Sure he had some decent lyrics in the period, but nothing (IMO) like they were before. So that was a problem for me also, regarding the WF album and the albums that followed it.
  5. nurktwin

    Quote Of The Day

    If you take from 1 person, it's called "stealing". If you take from many, it's called "research". Carlos Santana
  6. Shelter

    Quote Of The Day

    "This isn't hyperbole. We're looking at untold destruction — not just of the Amazon but for our entire planet." Christian Poirier, Amazon Watch on the burning rain forest "When will global apathy wear off?" Shelter, Reality Watch on our stupid ways.
  7. martin03345

    Farm Aid 1985 & 1986

    What in the hell did Marty McFly do to the solo on "Mean Woman Blues". Lol
  8. nurktwin

    Classic Rock Video of the Day II

    8/22/19 Mudcrutch
  9. MaryJanes2ndLastDance

    Wildflowers (the album) Opinion

  10. Shelter

    Wildflowers (the album) Opinion

    Eh.. yeah.. easy on the extended link jams, man.. Not that I don't like a good link to keep me jittery all night myself, but somehow I miss the old days when you where not into the heavy link stuff as much, when you kept it simple and rolled just on ramblings.. an occasional set fix perhaps just to be able to sleep..
  11. Last week
  12. MaryJanes2ndLastDance

    Wildflowers (the album) Opinion

    Ha ha, I never thought of it that way! I figured it was literal lights, or that perspective of being above a town and seeing the light from a bird's perspective, that sort of thing, a beautiful moment and image with accompanying feeling...! I guess I could see how people took that as another pot reference! ciao
  13. MaryJanes2ndLastDance

    Wildflowers (the album) Opinion

    Wow, I missed this! I guess it answers my question regarding the live jams and such; though...it brings up a new question which is, have you listened to live shows from later tours? Or was that it for live TPATH for you...? cheers
  14. MaryJanes2ndLastDance

    Wildflowers (the album) Opinion

    I agree, definitely a bit removed from the more singer-songwriter type songs or introspective, what have you of the Steve years. Aside from the acoustic prominence (to a degree I guess) I think FMF has more in common with early TP than later. The album is a textbook rock-n-roll/pop album, from the way the sides are arranged, the songs, so many neat riffs and melodies...the bees knees! As for ITGWO it seemed like the tale is the old band resisting and losing (?) to Lynne's approach but it still feels more of a kind with the first half, or the Stan years than what was to come. I'll go with NOT! Well, I just think it's one of his best songs (surprise surprise, right?) and from what I've read, Stan went with his creativity regarding the drum beat and man...that song bounces along, doesn't it? I don't even want to think about it ending up on WF even if it was close to the recording of that album. As far as last hurrahs go, in my opinion, Stan left on a high note whether or not he literally did leave after this song from that session and never looked back as the story is told. It's also told there are more tunes from that, a hidden last Stan Lynch on Drums TPATH album, maybe one day that'll emerge, if some of it wasn't too used up by Playback. cheers
  15. MaryJanes2ndLastDance

    Wildflowers (the album) Opinion

    I agree on all points though to be fair, the first couple times I heard it from the Fillmore recording I liked it as part of the overall feel of the show. But two, maybe three but more likely two listens were enough for me. But people love that story, pot or no pot. If you really want to wander down the crazy links of set lists discussions I'll point out the way; very polarizing. I feel like I've inundated you with links though so maybe you'd appreciate a break from them. cheers
  16. MaryJanes2ndLastDance

    Does God ever speak to you?

    I believe in God. I think sometimes we get messages from God whether or not we understand them. I hope things turned out good for weird monkey. cheers
  17. MaryJanes2ndLastDance

    Wildflowers (the album) Opinion

    https://www.mudcrutch.com/forum/index.php?/topic/14774-do-you-like-the-evolution-of-the-heartbreakers-sound/& https://www.mudcrutch.com/forum/index.php?/topic/16143-the-southern-accentswildflowers-theory/&tab=comments#comment-315307 https://www.mudcrutch.com/forum/index.php?/topic/15726-thoughts-on-the-two-tpaths/&tab=comments#comment-309468
  18. Shelter

    Wildflowers (the album) Opinion

    Well.. Again, a post full good points! I agree with most of them, if it doesn't seem like it. Like I said, I too sense development in TP's music over time. It has been discussed elsewhere (MJ2LD, links please!) from multiple perspectives, the extent to which TP may have changed styles in terms of songwriting and sound, both in studio and live, when such changes may have occured and how suddenly is part of debate legend. Haha.. The over all picture you communicate fits my own take pretty well, actually. It's just that I find the Grateful Dead connection as such - the definition of TPATH becoming essentially a "stoner band" - to be rather over stated and based on a long line of misunderstandings. Perhaps I spent too much time in my previous post kicking that particular horse.. that it was a factor for TP, well.. sure, on some level it may have been. But to me the development was rather more gradual and multilayered, I guess. Also more of a natural development than a conscious decision to do stoner rock, or to please a certain fan segment. The appeal to "stoner" audiences, to me should be seen more as a side effect, a minor aspect, if you will, of Tom musically turning towards a somewhat slower and more introvert swagger with age, rather than a deliberate move. For better or worse, sure. An older distinguished rocker revisiting the more "classic" styles of his field and the basic origins of the music of his youth (as in blues, country/folk rock and jams - all ingrediences that no doubt became more common past Wildflowers, sure). Something most ageing rockers seems to do. Most band rockers and punks turn singer songwriters with age, it seems - with or without their backing band intact. In a way a good thing, IMO. It's not totally void of pathetic dimensions, IMO, seeing the odd 60+ punk rocker still screaming and jumping about.. or even Mick Jagger at 75, strutting around as if it's still 1973, as if he had a hit since. Derailing.. sorry. But. From there I just don't see the sudden shift from band based rock'n'roll punch (you make a very apt discription of the 70s and early 80s TPATH, I think) so suddenly kicking in overnight on Wildflowers. I certainly agree there is a certain connection between Tom mellowing out, starting to roam slightly different pastures and Stan leaving. For sure. Very interesting, the drum aspect very key to understanding the history of this band, surely. And yes, Wildflowers marks the first all-on change in drum sound, no doubt.* But my understanding is that even the shift in sound generally speaking, was gradual and ongoing as well. If anything, FMF/TW was the moment of change in Tom's outlook. when it can be said to have became evident and "done". A fork in the road in probably more ways than WF, one may suggest. The FMF album and songs still being punch:y and short enough (which seem to be one of your key definitions), but still a definate diversion from the band based rock efforts that we were used to from TPATH up to that point. A reorientation it seemed, but not towards "stoner rock", certainly, but rather to a California defined vibe of acoustic guitars, boardwalks, converse and skateboards. Very light, breezy and hip, all in all. Probably an easy enough album to like for pot heads and skaterboys alike, granted.. Very freeeee fallin' and all. Still not by any definition a psychedelic, jam heavy, mellow spaced out folk rock or blues effort, or even a clear coming to age, turning introvert effort either. At least on the surface there is not much to think twice about on the masterpiece that is FMF. And not that much more heavy goods ITGWO either. Although, again.. on ITGWO the drums really started to change and the Touring The Great Wide Open was really one big TRIP, in many ways, wasn't it... in 1991 there were unmistaken stoner elements, yeah... hippie vibes.. "everyone hissed and booed", no nukes.. and all that. Add to that the very broadway stage set-up of what might be read as a Greatful Dead visual experience of chandeliers, a giant dream tree and a dragon, no less. The straight up, simple, short riff rock arrangements of the 70s and 80s already in large part gone from the TP formula. Still all the old rockers remained in the stable, ever typical themes of freedom, defiance, story telling all intact and thriving also in the newer material. Enters Mary Jane. With Stan already one foot out the door. (Mary Jane.. yeah.. another clue to what a groovy trip of an album WF was to become, supposedly? Maybe, maybe not.) Musically another step towards the mellow and groovy. But stoner rock, I think not. At this point Tom had really fashioned himself as the Dude, though, in terms of image. Which, added to YDHIF lyrics and GOLSD b-side, did set the stage for certain expectations for Wildflowers - no matter what styles of music were actually on the album. In short, I can see how there may have been something in the air (pun) to a "stoner" effect in this era, but I still think it's a surface thing, not totally mirrored in the actual music. That the deeper conenctions bewteen any actual "stoner rock" and Tom's songwriting/music was, and still is, based on a misunderstanding at large. Again, if you get high from the word "joint", that's alright by me, but the music, the arrangement and production of the song, don't go far past telling a story in the same old defiance vein, to me.** Moreover, perhaps paradoxically, while I agree with your taste on the drum issue.. I find the claim absurd that a switch from Stan to Steve behind the drums would be a switch towards anything even remotely close to a new musical direction in the vein of Greatful Dead, Jimi Hendrix or Jefferson Airplane or what have you. Even if I shared the opinion that TPATH went into stoner rock in the mid 90s, I wouldn't say they did so because of or thanks to Steve, but that they did so despite of him and his hard flap, flap time keeping. If they really wanted to go stoner, they should've kept Stan, is my take. Shit... sorry but it seems I start to repeat myself here. So many aspects and layers to keep track of.. so little brain.. hehe. Anyway. Just pick the cherries, so to speak.. if you find some. Very true. He did try something in 2002. And for most tours up to Wildflowers he tried to introduce a healthy dose of new stuff and the tours changed some from time to time. After Wildflowers, when all the slots more or less booked full with the expected hits (if not set to an exact order and with the exact same canned banter every year) that took a general turn for the worse/better, depending on viewpoint. Exception being Mojo tour, where they really stood their ground and introduced a bold full Mojo segment and Hypnotic Eye tour, where they actually played a few new songs. Again, though, I'm not sure how stoners react to sameness.. I suppose they like it. Anywaaay.. as far as crowd pleasing go, TP sticking to the safety net and Greatest Hits paradade live, really shows that crowd pleasing indeed was a factor for him. Even more so than fan pleasing supposedly. But at the end of the day.. depending on how you look at it, fans don't pay the bill. Crowds do. As far as the character of the actual music goes though, how it's written, how it's recorded and how it's produced, I'd say those are completely different issues from Tom pleasing crowds from the stage with his FMF/WF focus. Man.. that is.. Brilliant piece of writing, right there! If your stoner thesis ever needs an alibi.. look no further than Gloria. Couldn't agree more. And I'm not being sarcastic. I totally understand what you say here. Between the likes of Gloria and Mystic Eyes, there is smoke coming out of my ears even as a none smoker. Totally insane stuff and not in a very good way. Agreed. (And, btw, I say that as a big fan of their jams on Melinda and Crystal River.. I guess to me.. there are good trippy and bad trippy..) Then of course, their 1978 take of Dark End of the Street.. well.. let's just pretend that never happened. Right. This is very interesting, I think. It's always disappointing when people abandon ideals or don't live up to moral standards. I feel it too. And to a certain extent I think this is a somewhat valid critisism of TPATH. In this case as in other cases. Talking and walking was sometimes hard to coordinate. But keeping to the music then, yeah.. it could be something to this... But since it's not really about moral here, but rather just aestetic preferences, not to mention temper and passion and experience, and these things are bound to change in 20 years, not mention 30 or 40 years, no? I'm not sure it's that much of a break, really. (See further my above comments about personal development and growing older and all that.) They must have loved Gloria already in 1975 too.. But to stick to the point, whatever develops over decades may not be for everyone, sure, but I for one am glad TP continued to develop, rather than doing what lesser stars do, repeat their two or three biggest hits over and over. Trying to reenact the public idea of themselves. (Tom, again, did this, I think, to some extent, with his live shows, but not at all on record.) Especially since I don't believe Tom ever traded his legacy for a full blown stonership in the 90s. At least not that much musically. We all know about his personal decline. In the midst of it all, he kept searching and writing in mixed moods, yet developing, and it's an integrity thing that I much respect. That said, I may have personal preferences too among the various stages in the TPATH career, I like certain swings better than others. When it comes to the sound, I do miss the organic, very soulful presence of Stan's drumming. As I miss the harmony vocals of Howies very much - a topic not talked about or credited even nearly enough, over the years, very key to this band's heydays IMO. When it comes to the live sound, I do appriciate how raw and heavy and gritty (for lack of better words), yet crisp and rolling they were at the peak of their performing years, which happen to be the last years, IMO. When it comes to the very musical quality though.. it's rather a rather mixed bag. Some highligts before Wildflowers and some after. Some less good ideas here and there too. At the end of the day the 1981-1982 era may have been my favorite. Mostly due to constency and lack of flaws. But as far as ultimate highs go, I find them scattered throughout. Ok.. I'm not sure I know what we talk about here, any more. Maybe these attempts of mine to broaden the context (or misconception, as I see it) of the Greatful Dead references and stoner era of TPATH has just turned into the thread version of a trip to pirates cove all on its own.. And as such, I'm sure you don't like it. Sorry, man. ----- *Especially in hindsight. At the time Stan's drumming on ITGWO was very "stylised" and "tamed" and during the mid 90s era, Curt Bisquera and even Dave Grohl was in the mix too, let's not forget, so I'm not the shift didn't appear to quite done yet from back then. **Analysing lyrics may be difficult too. But if you take the pre WF and post WF periods, I'm not even sure the average nr of drug references are that much higher from WF on.. I really think you make another hen out this feather here.. so to speak.. when you suggest that TP's lyrics turned so incredibly different, starting in the mid 90s. Again, the perspective change when you get older. Maye one or two blunt drug references more - perhaps as part of a trend with generally more graphic and in your face imagery, who knows - maybe a tad more personal, contemplating.. even political in one or two instances. But over all? Wasn't it the same mixed set of themes and cries for freedom and rights and dreams... the same genius storytelling.. all to the end, really? Did the few examples that can no doubt be found, really define his whole body of work? But I could be wrong, maybe lyrics did change that dramatically towards drugs and I just didn't hear it. Either way - I would never say that he FOCUSED on pot in his songrwriting. No way. Either way - I know that simpliefied statistics will only take me that far, so I won't do the count of suspected lyrical references or readings.. You believe what you want to believe. So to speak. (The number of references to wings makes him what.. an aviator? And what about the dogs..? Did he somewhere along the line become a "canine" rocker..:? This opens for new ways to measure the treasure, doesn't it.)
  19. Mudcrutch

    Spam posts - what's that about?

    Considering spammers/bots have to know what Tom Petty's middle name is to even register, it is pretty impressive they even get to post.
  20. Big Blue Sky

    Spam posts - what's that about?

    Hello, so I've been noticing an outbreak of spam threads appearing on the forum lately. They've got a lot of nerve, these spam people / bots. And also noticing them being "disappeared", which is great work, obviously, so well done. Applause. Can't think of a devastatingly crushingTom Petty lyric for this occasion. Anyone? So, if in doubt, what about Bob Dylan, winner of Nobel Prize? "And I know you're dissatisfied with your position and your place / Don't you understand it's not my problem. I wish that for just one time you could stand inside my shoes / And just for that one moment I could be you. Yes, I wish that for just one time you could stand inside my shoes / You'd know what a drag it is to see you."
  21. nurktwin

    Happy Birthday, Angeldream!

    Happy Birthday Lisa, have a great day!!!!!!
  22. MaryJanes2ndLastDance

    Wildflowers (the album) Opinion

    Did you like when they jammed in concert, let's say from the WF tour on? Mike's surf instrumental, Breakdown, It's Good To Be King, Drivin' Down to Georgia, extended Mary Jane's, was that fun for you or would you have preferred them to maybe have one or two big numbers and the rest more of the tighter flow they had in the 70s and 80s. I think I included Shelter's Jam Extravaganza link above but if that's not to your taste, I could see why you'd have no comment on it. I see that link was in another topic but here it is again: https://www.mudcrutch.com/forum/index.php?/topic/16032-the-extended-jam-extravaganza-thread/&tab=comments#comment-313537 cheers
  23. MaryJanes2ndLastDance

    Wildflowers (the album) Opinion

    That is a good question that I don't think has ever been asked. Could have been but it's new to me and it's a good one. I really don't know on this one. My impression is the band wasn't always effusive with praise even when they liked something but that's a bit to the side of your question. I think they also let Tom know when they weren't feeling it. But overall direction? Stan is always mentioned that he doesn't like the direction, but the others...??? Hmm. To speculate, I think it's a mix, that is, they love being in the band overall, or the pluses far outweigh any minuses, and love playing music together. I figure having played together for so long, they love some music he writes, and just figure they'll ride out the ones they don't like. Guessing about the inside, it seems like they'd just have a different view, focused on the current song and doing the best they could with that; so any change in sound or direction to them wouldn't be the same to the listeners. And besides, once an album was done and the tour stars, they usually didn't play too much new stuff anyway. So the new album just becomes something from the past, especially once that tour ended. Each new album is a fresh start for the band and probably viewed as such. I figure most of the band was fine with any direction Tom went in as it was more about the journey (once they'd become successful) and less about any particular destination. And any changes of the type you mention above, may not even have been noticed by the band as it was incremental from their perspective. Right now, a new listener could throw on Damn the Torpedoes followed up by Echo and have quite a bit of "shock". But I don't think it was the same for the band, aside I guess, from Stan. It occurs to me now that reuniting Mudcrutch and recording Mojo were big evident changes, not just in sound but in overall approach and from what I've read, I think all involved both with Mudcrutch and back with the Heartbreakers liked the change. I think they all love the blues and let that and keeping Mike's playing in the forefront; whether one considers Mojo blues or "blues" it was a definite change to be that self-indulgent on a record and from what I gathered, they all liked it! Well, that's my thought on the matter. Interesting question, maybe one day someone will ask someone from the band that particular query. cheers
  24. WildflowerNJ

    Happy Birthday, Angeldream!

    I don't think Lisa comes by here anymore but it is her Birthday today. I want to wish you a very Happy Birthday, Lisa, and hope you are having a fun day. Love you 💖
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