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The firing of Stan Lynch

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https://www.moderndrummer.com/article/february-1984-stan-lynch-heartbreaking-rhythm/


Very cool and insightful interview with Stan Lynch from the Southern Accents era. You really get a sense of him as a person. He discusses his relationship with the band (and vice versa), his drumming rig, singing and playing, pre-show & tour warm ups, and how he's quit the band during the recording of every album.

At times, he comes across like big immature teenager, and at other times quite thoughtful and respectful. Always honest. If he didn't like the music, it's style, direction, or disagreed on anything, he was out. He'd leave. You can see the undercurrent of strain it created in the group. Probably exasperated Tom.

It's clear he had/has a big personality, was a fun loving guy who was taking a big bite out of life. Looking back, it some times would appear it was 4 against 1....and vice versa.

Stan is a good singer. I think he rocks when he gets a turn to cut loose and sing in concert. Howie was a great singer. And let's not get started on Mike. I often wonder if Tom was under-utilizing the Heartbreakers over the years?

Semi-related - The fact that he basically told Mike he couldn't put out an album because it would mess up the "Heartbreakers Brand". That's kinda lame to me. He comes across as threatened. I don't think people would think or see it as a Heartbreakes project, or even close to it. We actually like to keep these things separate in our minds and enjoy both for what they are. For example, Carl Broemel, guitarist for My Morning Jacket. He puts out solo albums which are awesome, and then there's his main band, the "main gig." I go see & enjoy both for what they are.

Was Tom that worried or intimidated about it? IMHO, Mike served Tom faithfully since day one. I wish Tom couldn't let his friend shine, and give him some glory, as it were. Be excited and supportive of him, give him his blessing, etc.

Ya know?

 

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6 hours ago, RedfordCowboy said:

 

Semi-related - The fact that he basically told Mike he couldn't put out an album because it would mess up the "Heartbreakers Brand". That's kinda lame to me. He comes across as threatened. I don't think people would think or see it as a Heartbreakes project, or even close to it. We actually like to keep these things separate in our minds and enjoy both for what they are. For example, Carl Broemel, guitarist for My Morning Jacket. He puts out solo albums which are awesome, and then there's his main band, the "main gig." I go see & enjoy both for what they are.

Was Tom that worried or intimidated about it? IMHO, Mike served Tom faithfully since day one. I wish Tom couldn't let his friend shine, and give him some glory, as it were. Be excited and supportive of him, give him his blessing, etc.

Ya know?

 

I know and I totally agree!

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On 10/31/2018 at 12:02 PM, RedfordCowboy said:

https://www.moderndrummer.com/article/february-1984-stan-lynch-heartbreaking-rhythm/


Very cool and insightful interview with Stan Lynch from the Southern Accents era. You really get a sense of him as a person. He discusses his relationship with the band (and vice versa), his drumming rig, singing and playing, pre-show & tour warm ups, and how he's quit the band during the recording of every album.

At times, he comes across like big immature teenager, and at other times quite thoughtful and respectful. Always honest. If he didn't like the music, it's style, direction, or disagreed on anything, he was out. He'd leave. You can see the undercurrent of strain it created in the group. Probably exasperated Tom.

It's clear he had/has a big personality, was a fun loving guy who was taking a big bite out of life. Looking back, it some times would appear it was 4 against 1....and vice versa.

Stan is a good singer. I think he rocks when he gets a turn to cut loose and sing in concert. Howie was a great singer. And let's not get started on Mike. I often wonder if Tom was under-utilizing the Heartbreakers over the years?

Semi-related - The fact that he basically told Mike he couldn't put out an album because it would mess up the "Heartbreakers Brand". That's kinda lame to me. He comes across as threatened. I don't think people would think or see it as a Heartbreakes project, or even close to it. We actually like to keep these things separate in our minds and enjoy both for what they are. For example, Carl Broemel, guitarist for My Morning Jacket. He puts out solo albums which are awesome, and then there's his main band, the "main gig." I go see & enjoy both for what they are.

Was Tom that worried or intimidated about it? IMHO, Mike served Tom faithfully since day one. I wish Tom couldn't let his friend shine, and give him some glory, as it were. Be excited and supportive of him, give him his blessing, etc.

Ya know?

 

That was a fantastic interview! Thanks for posting the link. It really gives you some insight into the tensions that simmered for years and eventually led to him becoming detached from the band in the late '80s/early '90s and leaving for good in 1994. Obviously, the topic of his firing has been discussed hundreds of times with fans taking sides on who was right, who wronged who, etc. For all the talk of Stan's performance in the studio or dedication to his craft, this proves he was a brilliant, meticulous drummer who was clearly interested in growing as a musician. He never really got that chance in the Heartbreakers — instead, his role actually diminished over time.

In the distinction between the two categories of his dismissal from the band: 1. his attitude/personal relations with his bandmates and 2. his performance on the drums, he certainly didn't do himself any favors in the first category. He was a fight-prone man with unrealistic expectations and and immature, stubborn tendencies. But from a pure musical point of view, however, this article shows how Stan was stymied and ultimately got shafted.

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That was great, thanks.  Sounds like it was right after the Long After Dark tour.  Little did he know what a mess that next recording session was going to be.  I can see how it would be hard to be told exactly what to play - considering by that time the band was pretty well established and all were clearly very talented.  That might create some tension, and not just between Stan and Tom.  As he said, he wasn't the only one that quit a time or two. I do miss his style and the flair he had back there - and his vocals. I always thought he sang great.  

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On 11/2/2018 at 9:09 PM, TomFest said:

 I always thought he sang great.  

 I didn’t think any of the band were/are great singers more passable but I did enjoy when they played Psychotic Reaction with Stan singing which I saw them do  I think it was the tour when they used the twisting tree on stage. Great Wide Open Tour ? 

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Having reread some of Zanes book and an interview with Modern Drummer from the Petty Archives I again came to the Duck Dunn anecdote; it wasn't the only place this story is told and I think it says quite a bit. Basically Dunn was happy with the take and per Stan, without this highly repsected outsider musician's opinion it would've been torn apart, Tom saying it was too fast, Iovine saying it was too slow. Or the other way around, it doesn't matter.

 
I think it was the combination of Stan's personality and what Tom wanted from a drummer, it seemed, especially after Full Moon Fever that Tom had achieved more of an elevated position in the band and for his vocal, this in conjunction with the change in songwriting Stan wasn't happy about all led to a stew of negativity.
 
Certainly I do believe Tom wanted Stan to stay and tour Widlfowers but from what I've read it just seemed like it wasn't going to work between them anymore.
 
In some ways, one could say ITGWO was the last album of the original band, or Heartbreakers 1.0. After that album the jangle sound and what Benmont called the chamber music element of the band seemed to go away; now everyone continued to play tastefully but the songs themselves seem different, less about the differnet players mergiging together to form someting and now stricly supporting the structure of the song. Listen to anything from let's say, Long After Dark or Damn the Torpedoes and then Echo or Mojo. Or even the Last Dj. Benmont still finds the right space for the keyboard but that interesting combination of instruments isn't there in the same way.
 
Of course, the band had to progress.
 
Back to the drums. Tom and Mike were blown away by Steve's precision. If one were to boil things down, it would seem like this:
 
Stan: lots of personality in his drumming but erratci in the studio,t eh trade-off being his unique feel never quite became metronome precision.
 
Steve: lots of precisoin, just metronome like, no problem. But early on he's told to keep to a basic drumming, eliminate a lot of fills etc. So he never had a chance to share whatever was potentially unique aoubt his drumming the way Stan did. 
 
So maybe in some ways, comparing the two isn't fair since Stan had more of a free reign though the producers and maybe Tom didn't always like the results.
 
Steve was the new guy and entered this one-in-a-million chance to play with a HUGE  band and certainly wans't going to rock the boat.
 
Another point: Stan said that he came up with his own feel for Mary Jane's Last Dance instead of doing what he was told which was to emulate the drums from Gimme Shelter. And it's a good thing Stan stuck to his guns! He was right.
 
I think maybe he was right more often than perceived, but suffereed from the perfectionist atmosphere of the time, Iovine and Lynne. I don't think the band nor Tom would have the same approach to the drums by Mojo.
 
I guess some of it was the freshness of Steve as well, no drama, which would've been a huge factor. Not only does he nail the first take he's given but he's willing to do whatever they want and seems like a nice guy.
 
In the end, for better or worse Stan was out but as he said, he had a nineteen year run which is pretty damn good!
 
And his playing his heard across the world too.
 
And Steve was there for Tom's last big hit album and the band's progression as they went along.
 
It just seems, that sure, Stan was a handful to deal with and maybe wasn't the easiset, but I wonder how much of his playing was nitpicked. I realize we don't know but what do you all think?
 

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