Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
martin03345

Across the Borderline

Recommended Posts

I'm not sure if there is a mystery here, and if so, what it is.

Let me say this, though. Ever since Jeff Rosen was handed an office of his own in the Bob Tower, assigned a league of handymen and the keys to the vaults - through all my sleepless nights of ramblings ever since, forever lost in an endless flood of Bob's once discarded 60s and 70s recordings - I've been waiting for him to let some of his old school goons loose on the 80s floor. So to speak. Let them try that out for hight. In short - yes! - it would be fantastic if the BDATPATH tours of '86 and '87 would finally be featured in the legendary Bootleg Series. Let's say just the two or three best shows + the noteworthy odd material + a documentary + a remastered release of the truly fanstic live document "Hard To Handle" on DVD + a book. I would call the Bob Tower right away and ask them to send one down. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

strikes me as a european release of bootleg stuff. Unauthorized in the US but taken from broadcast so allowed in the UK and imported under the wire in the US to indy shops.

Quote

Provided to YouTube by IIP-DDS Across The Borderline (Live) · Tom Petty Broadcast Rarities ℗ The Media Champ Released on: 2017-10-26 Artist: Tom Petty Auto-generated by YouTube.

nice find none the less! Bob err Lucky sounds great here! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Hoodoo Man said:

Unauthorized in the US but taken from broadcast so allowed in the UK and imported under the wire in the US to indy shops.

A lot of bands missed out by not releasing live albums, as there was a demand for it. Especially pre-internet; if you wanted to see TPATH live you either caught them in concert or saw them on TV and that was that. Maybe it wasn't a huge market or the audience for bootlegs a lot smaller than those who purchase albums, but it was there. I don't quite understand what the managers/musicians were thinking at the time.

It doesn't matter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fact for the musicians at that time was "The money isn't there for us". The greed of the record companies sank a lot of groups and put them into bankruptcy.  Bootlegs became a way to get your favorite bands live and in concert for a fraction of the cost, so they became popular. And neither the bands nor the record companies made any money from it! If you found a bootleg of your fav band today for $3, wouldn't you buy it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember some bootleg vinyl in the 70's for as low as  $1.  I bought a Cream bootleg for $1 because the "Hot Wacks" bootleg guide said "Worst bootleg ever".  I had to see how bad it was.  It was as advertised.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought the bootleg of the Beatles "Let It Be" LP a month before the real LP came out for $1.00. I also bought the Beatles bootlegs of "Indian Rope Trick" and  John's "Live In Toronto" and more for only $1. Whatever happened to the good old days?????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, MaryJanes2ndLastDance said:

A lot of bands missed out by not releasing live albums, as there was a demand for it. Especially pre-internet; if you wanted to see TPATH live you either caught them in concert or saw them on TV and that was that. Maybe it wasn't a huge market or the audience for bootlegs a lot smaller than those who purchase albums, but it was there. I don't quite understand what the managers/musicians were thinking at the time.

So true!  Even in the age of vinyl there was demand for live concert recordings and studio outtakes, but the major labels seemed uninterested in releasing them.  The cost of putting out a bootleg recording on vinyl had to be very high, yet a few people took the chance of doing it anyway.  

The major labels mainly would react only if a live recording became very popular, and the major labels would call it "beat the bootlegs", as if they wanted to kill off the bootleg operators, rather than offering fans the product they wanted.  So the Rolling Stones released "Get Yer Ya Yas Out" entirely because of bootlegs of that tour, and the official release was well-received.  Likewise, Paul McCartney's Wings were the subject of a very popular 3 LP (red, white, and blue vinyl) from a bootlegger on the "Over America" tour, which led to their own very popular official release.  No bootleg, no "Wings Over America" would have been released.  Along similar lines, Cheap Trick's "Live at Budokan" was a Japan-only release, but made its way to the US, became so in-demand that the label released it officially in the US, where it became their biggest album. 

You have to wonder how many times these companies would have to learn the same lesson.  But at least in the vinyl age they had an excuse, because concert albums required 2 or 3 LPs to do them justice (or in the case of the Bruce Springsteen "Piece de Resistance" bootleg, 5 LPs).  That's costly and takes up space in a record store, for something that's potentially slow-selling.

As recordings moved to CDs, live concert recordings became all the more possible, and compact.  Yet the major labels were still uninterested in releasing live CDs, leaving the bootleggers to pick up the slack.  There still might have been the problem of record stores only wanting the fastest-moving product, but at least concert CDs didn't take up much space. 

With the internet, there was really no excuse not to offer live concert CDs.  The problem of inventory was solved, as no longer did every local record store need to carry the live recording.  They could all be distributed from one location.  Yet STILL the major labels were mostly uninterested in this type of release (with a few exceptions).

Today we have digital distribution over the internet, not  even requiring a physical CD.  A few artists/labels now offer some live recordings from their websites, but most are missing out on a way of both pleasing fans and making some extra cash for themselves.  I truly don't get it.  I guess the only explanation is that the mindset of the executives is still stuck back in the age of vinyl and record store only distribution.   

As far as TPATH, thankfully many "unofficial" releases can be found on the internet, for those who know where to look.  Even TP  himself said he enjoyed hearing bootlegs.  But we know there are still more high quality live and studio recordings stuck in the vaults, that die-hard fans would love to hear.   Look at all the effort that went into the "Live Anthology", yes that was great, but a lot of fans would love to hear the full concerts from which those (and beyond) were taken.    

 

             

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, TheSameOldDrew said:

2 or 3 LPs to do them justice (or in the case of the Bruce Springsteen "Piece de Resistance" bootleg, 5 LPs).  That's costly and takes up space in a record store, for something that's potentially slow-selling.

That's a good point.

 

16 hours ago, TheSameOldDrew said:

As recordings moved to CDs, live concert recordings became all the more possible, and compact.  Yet the major labels were still uninterested in releasing live CDs.......With the internet, there was really no excuse not to offer live concert CDs. 

All good points. I agree!

Some bands, you could do live releases of every show, others from every tour and others, maybe only one or two big live releases, but that's still a lot of money for something that's pretty much recorded; heck, I think soundboard recordings sound good without being put through any official record making process.

16 hours ago, TheSameOldDrew said:

I truly don't get it.  I guess the only explanation is that the mindset of the executives is still stuck back in the age of vinyl and record store only distribution.   

Yeah and maybe the fear  a live album would detract from purchasing the next studio record. As if...! People who are enjoy a band's music can buy a live album and still be interested in the next studio record. The former should theoretically build interest in the latter. If it's a live performance worth releasing...!

cheers

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/5/2020 at 8:01 PM, nurktwin said:

^    That's "Sir Bob".

Yeah noooooo crap but it popped up on their YouTube so I'm wondering what this release is lol. As Shelter said, I would love to see a series come out from their tour with Bob. Some good bootlegs exist from those shows and it'd be nice to seen them cleaned up and palatable for the consumer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, martin03345 said:

Yeah noooooo crap but it popped up on their YouTube so I'm wondering what this release is lol. As Shelter said, I would love to see a series come out from their tour with Bob. Some good bootlegs exist from those shows and it'd be nice to seen them cleaned up and palatable for the consumer.

are you aware of the live petty web page? there are a lot of shows with Bob and TPHB there. Its done by year so look at 84/85 there are a few unauthorized bootlegs that were released as LPs there too including the pre-tour band rehearsals which I think are "soundboard" recordings. livepetty.com> audio> TPHB> 1980s

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Hoodoo Man said:

are you aware of the live petty web page? there are a lot of shows with Bob and TPHB there. Its done by year so look at 84/85 there are a few unauthorized bootlegs that were released as LPs there too including the pre-tour band rehearsals which I think are "soundboard" recordings. livepetty.com> audio> TPHB> 1980s

Yes but again, I'd like to see actual, official live releases from them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, martin03345 said:

Yes but again, I'd like to see actual, official live releases from them.

Me too. I would say the Live Anthology is pretty nice and the extra disc from Best Buy makes it nicer but was there anything else besides the live Leg from 78 and Pack up the plantation (aside from the 2 volumes of Kiss my amp?)  I would pay for a box set from the first set of  Fillmore dates (97) as I've heard quite a few shows but  there are a number that have never surfaced online as far as I know and as someone that enjoys the covers the band did and the loose set lists these shows were a joy... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, MaryJanes2ndLastDance said:

Viper Room show with Stan, one of the last performances with him.

Oh there are a lot of performances I want. What  I meant what was what was actually released for live albums? Not much. :(   

As I understand it, some time in the mid to late 90s they started keeping soundboard recording of nearly all if not all live shows.  I don't think there is a ton of value to the 2000-2017 tour individual shows due to set list stagnation and choreographed lights video etc from at least that era forward, but if the estate was to somehow offer a subscription service like Sirius where I could listen to any show any time, especially the ones I attended I would gladly pony up 4.99 a month or 15 bucks for a CD of the shows I was at.  Sure its fun to have that Spinal tap moment of "Great to be in (looks at guitar back) Boston!" moment but I can live without that shout out. 

But it would be nice if they released something like the 30th anniversary tour, and the ITGWO tour on streaming services as I loved watching Tom run around during DCAHNM and climbing the tree opening the box etc.  I guess the last DJ had a DVD release as well but its one of the few things I never picked up as I'm not a huge fan of that album.  I do have High grass live too but have yet to open it as I've seen parts of it on youtube and I like my tunes portable on my iPhone. (Note to self I really need to get on Amazon Prime video and see what is streaming for free.)   OK Fenway was released too and I was there, so it's cool, but what was aired was a third of the actual show...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes the Live Anthology is great and I do love how it blends the tracks into one long, seamless concert spanning over their at the time 33 year history but at the same time, we haven't gotten an LP release of them live worth a damn. Sure Soundstage and the Live at the Olympic are great but they're not LPs. There's a whole bunch of boots we all have that we'd like to see to be released. I would love to see an official release of the London shows from 1980, a Fillmore run box set, etc. It's one of the bands greatest sins that they were so reserve when it came to live releases. Not saying they need to be like Dave Matthews and have 400 releases, and it was nice to see from 2010 on they were attaching that tours recordings to your tickets but there are a couple of tours like the Torpedoes tour that should have had a live LP to back it seeing as it was a great tour and also a top album.

 

Or they could've gone the Wilco route and offer a select number of live shows they recorded online as a download for a nominal fee. I'd gladly pay it as I did for Wilco's show at Brewery Ommegang in Cooperstown back in 2011. Was there and ended up being one of the best shows I've ever seen and glad they had it on offer to continue to listen to this day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Hoodoo Man said:

offer a subscription service like Sirius where I could listen to any show any time, especially the ones I attended I would gladly pony up 4.99 a month or 15 bucks for a CD

I'm not a fan of subscription services, I think it's best to own the music you're paying for. Live downloads of a show are fine and years back I would've been excited for some live cds from TPATH but even by the time live anthology had come out I'd heard quite a bit (and as you note, there is a bit of a limited amount of shows to release unless people really want to own very similar concerts) so it's too late for my interest which has been largely satiated by high quality live shows online or from other fans.

Still, I like the idea in principle and there are full concerts they could release, even as downloads.

10 hours ago, martin03345 said:

haven't gotten an LP release of them live worth a damn.

That's very true. There's something fun about listening to an entire show, "warts and all" than a hodgepodge of select live tunes. Years ago I had a long drive to Chicago, not much sleep, barely any at all and threw in the last Fillmore concert; well, that certainly ate up a lot of time and made for a fun, energized drive. My impression, is that the more hardcore fan, the more they want it all, demos, alternate takes, and complete live shows, even listening to the whole thing through, songs they don't particularly care for and audience noise as part of the entire immersive experience.

Well, however one listens, enjoying a show with all its peaks and valleys is a fun experience and something apparently, a lot of bands have missed out on releasing to willin' audiences.

cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ Great discussion, guys!

 

5 hours ago, martin03345 said:

Sure Soundstage and the Live at the Olympic are great but they're not LPs.

Yes. This is very true. Despite all the endless angles on discography and live shows we've been over through the years, I'm not sure that enough stress have been put on this aspect. I trust myself to have mentioned it somewhere... but maybe not.

Anyway. Here is a band famed and hailed for being this top notch, genuine and true live playing outfit sailing throw decade after decade in the big league and they just didn't do full format live albums, did they? There is The Plantation. And that's it. Yes, there are one EP from early days (OLL) and two EP:s from the latter era (KMA).* There are also a few odd live tracks on single b-sides and sure, let's not forget the scattered bastard mega "show" called Live Anthology, as mentioned. All of this great enough. But still.. They are not LPs (or CDs). 

Before saying another word, I must ask you to consider the format again. (And I think this is what martin is about here). Live LP. That is a sound only release that feature either a full show or the main idea of a show or tour, persented over the lenght of a record (or two, or three). That is, save for some photos and graphic design on inner or book, and the occasional video bonus material - there are no visuals to a live album. The main concept is the music, the sound of it, and the lengthier format that provides context and "takes you there." Live records is - all the interesting aspects of bootlegs aside - a concept as old as recorded music itself. It's classic format, very much exactly in the vein of everything that TPATH was ever about, moreover.

So, what did they do? Either they thought their faces too beautiful to be missed by anyone, or their live shows too spectacular visually not to ever go with music only. Ever since that first quite spectacular-for-its-time release Plantation - which happen to be both a live record with a concert film at the side - they went all in with the "side", so to speak. That is, from the start they went with visual releases, videos, whenever they felt the need to drop a live document. I can see how Take The Highway do check a lot of boxes (era, visual show, new material, commercial peak) to grant its existence as a stand alone live document on video only. It's ok, it's very cool even. But then it just kept on.. with the High Grass Dogs... The Olympic.. Soundstage.. Santa Monica (in LA box) and 30th Anniv, Gainesville (in RDAD box). And that is just the physical live video releases, not including all the broadcasts/stearming etc that's been a natural part of our day and age.  

Add to this all the video documentaries - released physically and/or broadcasted - and it starts to add up to a rather generous catalog of visual documents. Still only one live album proper. And this always amazed me, actually. It borders on the criminal, right? Both in the face of it's own logic and compared to anyone or anything even remotely comparable. 

So, why? Beats me. I mean, the obvious argument that springs to mind may be "Why release more than one live album when the set largely stayed the same over the years anyway, or at the very least that the material over lap will be so huge." Well. That just not fair, after all. Such logic does have some merit perhaps, as to why they didn't release an album for each tour or even for each decade, but it doesn't quite hold up in face of the issue as a whole.

For one thing, the set did change a bit from 1985 to 1991 (meaning Highway could have been an LP too) and again some after 1995 (Dogs would have been better as an LP as it is as a film). Then, even since most of the slots of the traveling show were fully booked, post Greatest Hits /Wildflowers era - this has to be admitted - there were tours with a comparatively unique average set, like 1999, 2002 and 2010. Also there was the rather unique oportunity for a very special release when they did Europe for the first time in 20+ years in 2012. Well... and (here it comes...) not to mention the obvious suspects of interest for any live album release discussion - each of the residencies of 97, 03 and 13 would surely have been a perfect base for wonderful live records).

For another thing. Live records can be and usually is edited. That is, any collection of live tracks could present a bigger share "interesting" or "unique" material than was any complete show did. Beside, for some reason I don't think Tom thought repetition to be a problem. (Besides, obviously they still thought themselves varied enough over time to release all the videos mentioned). Basically, any imaginable live record, from any tour almost, wouldn't necessarily have to feature the same 12 basic songs, surely. Even if one or three of the huge hits may be a good selling point, those too could be cherry picked not to be the exact same on every release, which in fact they seem to have done, at least to some extent for the various video releases. (But even so - we have had how many live video versions of Runnin' Down A Dream?? Free Fallin'? Refugee? You Wreck Me? Again - this is not the aspect that was gonna stop anybody, period.)

So, all in all, I don't see why at least two or three more live records down the years - maybe one for a complete show and one culled from recidency - would not have been both nice and very much doable. Quite a shame, as I see it, that they were so bent on visual releases all this time. That way they missed out on one of the most classic aspects and formats to showcase their masterful skills and vibe. What's not to love? Com'on.. let's hear it for the LIVE LP?

Ok. Too late now to change this approach, isn't it. But it is interesting to ponder why they decided to do it this way. 

7 hours ago, martin03345 said:

Or they could've gone the Wilco route and offer a select number of live shows they recorded online as a download for a nominal fee.

With the development of technology, and dare I say consumer habits, I sure hope the Estate takes the high road with this issue. That they will indeed either release a bunch of complete shows from over the years - shows of special interest and/or quality - for download and streaming OR that they will produce at least a couple of high end archival physical releases (maybe most specifically then with focus on the recidencies). Preferably both. At this point, it is what it is when it comes to all of those passed tours and "average shows". I don't believe the market is that great any more. Sorry. For "the complete shows archives" type of thing, I think the digital download/stream library is the only reasonable way to go. As much as I was hoping for a live LP release back then - after the 1999 tour.. then again after the 2002 tour.. the 2012 tour or 2014 tour.. I realize there may not be much point in producing all these physical releases from those old shows at this point. But again.. let's hope the technique now available works to all of our benefit in this, that it will help the people in charge thinking it worth while to share this legacy with the world, making a lot of those lost gems available at least digitally at long last. So, let's keep the photobooks and all the plastic for a few really nice installments of residency type boxes, I'd say. Ok, thank you kindly.

 

 

-----

* Plus an EP for Mudcrutch, but that may be another topic all together, even if related.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Shelter said:

With the development of technology, and dare I say consumer habits, I sure hope the Estate takes the high road with this issue. That they will indeed either release a bunch of complete shows from over the years - shows of special interest and/or quality - for download and streaming OR that they will produce at least a couple of high end archival physical releases

Good points by all here.  In terms of audio-only official releases, TPATH comes up short given their 40 year history of concert performance.  Officially, audio only, there's Pack Up the Plantation, LIve Anthology, a few live songs on Playback, an extra disc on the deluxe RDAD film release, a few live songs on the Deluxe DTT, and a few live songs on American Treasure (4 CD version).   Plus there's the Official Live Leg LP.  I think that covers it all; maybe I'm missing something.  

That's pretty haphazard in terms of official live audio-only.  I realize that Live Anthology was meant to cover a lot of ground, and it does.  But there isn't a single official release of a full concert (Pack Up The Plantation comes closest, and it's not exactly representative of the band, due to the horn presence). 

Bruce Springsteen is often mentioned with Tom Petty, both being born in 1950, both out to "save rock and roll" starting in the 1970's, etc.  I've always enjoyed TPATH a lot more than Springsteen/E-Street, but I have enjoyed much of what they do (their 1978 shows especially, such as Winterland in SF).  Interestingly, Springsteen now offers full shows on his official website, as downloads or physical CDs.  Most of his touring years offer one, two, or three shows.  All the more interesting though, the most recent touring years offer a ton of shows, like 12-15 each.  Which likely means that demand for the full concert recordings was so strong, that they decided to record more of them for potential sale in recent years, once they realized that there was a demand for the older shows.  At any rate, I think the Springsteen website sales present a model for what TPATH could do officially.  

In the case of TPATH, we know from the notes associated with LIve Anthology that they recorded a huge number of shows from which these individual songs were drawn.  I can't say I'm lacking in TPATH live recordings, but I'd still go for some official live full concert shows in high quality, especially from the Stan-era.  I don't care if there are a few mistakes here and there, that's live rock and roll, and sometimes can be interesting in themselves.   

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

and the often overlooked Live at the Olympic: Last DJ & More (CD & DVD) 

pretty weak live CD though... :( perhaps most notable for the concert DVD not having American Girl as the last number or in the set... 

 

Disc: 1

  1. I'm Crying (Live) - The Heartbreakers / Tom Petty
  2. Done Somebody Wrong (Live) - The Heartbreakers / Tom Petty
  3. I Got a Woman (Live) - The Heartbreakers / Tom Petty
  4. Carol (Live) - The Heartbreakers / Tom Petty

 

Disc: 2

  1. The Last DJ
  2. Money Becomes King
  3. Dreamville
  4. Joe
  5. When a Kid Goes Bad
  6. Like a Diamond
  7. Lost Children
  8. Blue Sunday
  9. You and Me
  10. The Man Who Loves Women
  11. Have Love Will Travel
  12. Can't Stop the Sun
  13. Change of Heart
  14. I Need to Know
  15. Shake Rattle and Roll
  16. Around and Around
  17. Mary Jane's Last Dance
  18. You Wreck Me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And just in case those don't know, the original post is Bob and TPATH live from 86 at Ralph Wilson Stadium for Farm Aid. (Yes I know it was Rich Stadium then and now New Era Field but the Buffalo Bills fan that I will always be will still to this day call it the Ralph lol).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On March 8, 2020 at 10:19 PM, Hoodoo Man said:

What  I meant what was what was actually released for live albums? Not much

Ah, okay.

On March 9, 2020 at 9:43 AM, Shelter said:

Live LP. That is a sound only release that feature either a full show or the main idea of a show or tour, persented over the lenght of a record (or two, or three).

Yes. No matter how entertaining, sitting there watching Take the Highway or HIgh Grass Dogs demands a level of attention and just has a different impact than the joy of the live album/bootleg.

On March 9, 2020 at 9:43 AM, Shelter said:

The main concept is the music, the sound of it, and the lengthier format that provides context and "takes you there." Live records is - all the interesting aspects of bootlegs aside - a concept as old as recorded music itself. It's classic format, very much exactly in the vein of everything that TPATH was ever about, moreover.

Exactly!

On March 9, 2020 at 9:43 AM, Shelter said:

Either they thought their faces too beautiful to be missed by anyone, or their live shows too spectacular visually not to ever go with music only. Ever since that first quite spectacular-for-its-time release Plantation

Ha ha! My guess is someone in the record company thought a live album would be competition against their studio albums in a way a live vhs tape would not. Or maybe they just figured it would hold more of an interest for potential buyers than just a live record. I think mixed in with this could be Tom's love of films as well and that somehow translating into a focus on live vhs/dvd releases.

On March 9, 2020 at 9:43 AM, Shelter said:

and it starts to add up to a rather generous catalog of visual documents. Still only one live album proper. And this always amazed me, actually. It borders on the criminal, right?

Kind of yes.

I don't get it either. There's just something fun and unique about a live album that the live dvd doesn't offer, also, you have to account for the editing choices of the latter, while the former is just pure sonic bliss. Kinda the difference between a song and the music video that goes with it.

On March 9, 2020 at 9:43 AM, Shelter said:

Such logic does have some merit perhaps, as to why they didn't release an album for each tour or even for each decade, but it doesn't quite hold up in face of the issue as a whole.

Yes and this goes back to my earlier point Drew agreed with, they missed out on not releasing a live album after each tour, or more likely a best of live album. And now, well...more on that later.

On March 9, 2020 at 9:43 AM, Shelter said:

the set did change a bit from 1985 to 1991 (meaning Highway could have been an LP too)

Yes. Picture Highway as a double live album, two cds (three vinyl?) with the entire show, including All or Nothing. I think it would've done well as Tom was still riding the energy of FMF and the tour was a success and people loved ITGWO and of course, this was before the GH dominance. They still could you know but...more on that later.

On March 9, 2020 at 9:43 AM, Shelter said:

this has to be admitted - there were tours with a comparatively unique average set, like 1999, 2002 and 2010. Also there was the rather unique oportunity for a very special release when they did Europe for the first time in 20+ years in 2012. 

Yes. And some of those Echo shows are quite good, the band is on, the playing inspired and if they did indeed cherry pick performances, a live album could've included Rhino Skin. I think everyone is on the same page that while the few times they played it, the band took a perhaps disappointing turn with the performance, going a bit mellow instead of an explosion of power that it was still fun to hear.

And you're right, despite my own and others griping about the set list, valid arguments and all, there were shows here and there where the band dug deep and surprised. When the Time Comes?! incredible. Nightwatchman??? Who knew.

On March 9, 2020 at 9:43 AM, Shelter said:

But even so - we have had how many live video versions of Runnin' Down A Dream?? Free Fallin'? Refugee? You Wreck Me? Again - this is not the aspect that was gonna stop anybody, period.)

Ha ha! While mostly a live concert purist, just share the show in good quality, no editing, I understand your point about the repetition. I think there are also enough songs played that even a single live album collection from different tours/residencies would work well too. And refreshing. Heck, I usually skip Won't Back Down/Free Fallin' and Ref/Runnin when I listen to live albums depending on my mood. Same with You Wreck Me, the usual ones. 

On March 9, 2020 at 9:43 AM, Shelter said:

So, all in all, I don't see why at least two or three more live records down the years - maybe one for a complete show and one culled from recidency - would not have been both nice and very much doable. Quite a shame, as I see it, that they were so bent on visual releases all this time. That way they missed out on one of the most classic aspects and formats to showcase their masterful skills and vibe.

Yes. And now it's too late. Well, sure, I hope they release some live albums using your words as template but for me, it's too late. Live Anthology was largely too late. I was so excited when I purchased the one disc live 89 show from a record convention, that South Carolina performance (?) with The Damage You've Done and the incredible acoustic Even the Losers. i listened to the heck out of that album. But with the internet and the generosity of so many tapers and of course, the wonderful Livepetty site, my TPATH live wants have largely been satiated. 

Sure, years ago I would've gladly purchased live albums as you describe. But now? How many live versions of You Wreck Me do I need? I've heard, what I think are some of the best shows from different tours. And despite the Fillmore's bulk of deep cuts and unique covers, overall there is so much overlap that it doesn't really interest me. Still, for those that want this and more, I hope they do release them. 

But I think they lost out on a significant potential number of listeners by not releasing live albums. For me anyway, I realize others will still gladly purchase new live albums if they are a comin'. Heck, I still may depending on what they choose to release.

But as my taste expanded and I realized how much of an overlap there was between tours over the years, my excitement for Live Anthology wasn't really there. Let alone the number of covers that ended up on it. And while it does have some stand out performances, Melinda, Nightwatchman etc. what live TPATH offered had diminished for me.

And of course, with the internet and wonderful sites with free recordings, full shows (!) from different periods of time, why be dependent on what is released when there's so much out there that hadn't been and was more in tune with my taste.

But even that reaches an end and while I do sometimes throw on some live TPATH, right now I'm more interested in the studio recordings sitting in a storage space somewhere.

On March 9, 2020 at 9:43 AM, Shelter said:

What's not to love? Com'on.. let's hear it for the LIVE LP?

Yes! The live album is great! And there's something fun as you mention above, about opening it, seeing some live pics and knowing the rest is pure music, no rapid editing, just the sounds of band and audience.

cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On March 9, 2020 at 12:03 PM, TheSameOldDrew said:

I've always enjoyed TPATH a lot more than Springsteen/E-Street,

Me too. I don't even like Springsteen for the most part, but it's a shame that TPATH didn't have more in common with him when it came to live shows/releases.

On March 9, 2020 at 12:03 PM, TheSameOldDrew said:

but I'd still go for some official live full concert shows in high quality, especially from the Stan-era.  I don't care if there are a few mistakes here and there, that's live rock and roll, and sometimes can be interesting in themselves. 

Hear hear!

On March 9, 2020 at 2:32 PM, Hoodoo Man said:

pretty weak live CD though... :( perhaps most notable for the concert DVD not having American Girl as the last number or in the set... 

Yeah I agree. Though that is one heck of an amazing version of MJ!

On March 9, 2020 at 2:32 PM, Hoodoo Man said:
 1. I'm Crying (Live) - The Heartbreakers / Tom Petty
  2. Done Somebody Wrong (Live) - The Heartbreakers / Tom Petty
  3. I Got a Woman (Live) - The Heartbreakers / Tom Petty
  4. Carol (Live) - The Heartbreakers / Tom Petty

 

I don't get it. All those covers. What a waste.

On March 9, 2020 at 9:43 AM, Shelter said:

- after the 1999 tour.. then again after the 2002 tour.. the 2012 tour or 2014 tour.. I realize there may not be much point in producing all these physical releases from those old shows at this point.

Yes, missed opportunities for sure. While I love holding the physical live album in my hand, as you say, there doesn't seem much point, unless they go the very affordable route, simple cardboard sleeve, few photos, I don't know. 

cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...