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Hoodoo Man

Twenty five years ago today 11/19/94

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No it was not Sgt Pepper telling the band to play. Tom played SNL with the Heartbreakers and Dave Grohl on Drums. So I guess its been that long since Stan punched the clock for the last rhythmic time...

https://liveforlivemusic.com/features/tom-petty-dave-grohl-snl-video/?fbclid=IwAR3uh_SIDIkO_JDRHLjS5GhGI-GfshvpWNi0h_4s_hKY1NjFLAUyEzRP-Qs

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers Play SNL With Dave Grohl, On This Day In ’94 [Video]

Andrew O'Brien | Tuesday, November 19th, 2019
Tom Petty

In the wake of Tom Petty‘s sudden passing in 2017—which came immediately following an extended celebratory 40th-anniversary tour with The Heartbreakers—we dug back through our favorite gems from the larger-than-life rocker’s prolific career. Any fan knows that such a dive into the work of Tom Petty was bound to turn up uncountable gems, from this effortlessly cool TV interview to the unlikely origins of “Free Fallin'”. That brings us to today’s selection from the archives of Petty greatness: On this date in 1994, Petty & the Heartbreakers performed on Saturday Night Live, delivering renditions of “Honey Bee” and “You Don’t Know How It Feels”.

Bob Dylan Honors Fallen Friend Tom Petty With “Learning To Fly” Cover In CO [Watch]

For this performance, the band had recruited a special addition: drummer Dave Grohl, who was recently out of work after the death of his Nirvana bandmate, Kurt Cobain, in April of that year. Grohl joined Petty and company for a brief period in 1994. Tom even allegedly offered the young musician a permanent spot in the band, which he turned down (with some difficulty) to start his own new band: Foo Fighters. As Grohl told documentarian Peter Bogdanovich about those days, “I can’t think of any band that sounds like Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers…He’s just a badass.”

Below, you can watch a video of Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers (& Dave Grohl) performance on Saturday Night Live in 1994:

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers (with Dave Grohl) – “You Don’t Know How It Feels”

[Video: fffgfg fgfgfgfg]

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers (with Dave Grohl) – “Honey Bee” + Interviews

[Video: drcturkleton]

This 1977 Interview Proves That Tom Petty Was Coolness Personified [Watch]

Since Petty’s death, we’ve relived everything from the stories behind his biggest hits, to his performance on one of the entertainment industry’s biggest stages as a Super Bowl Halftime Show headliner, and beyond. With each new story you hear, or old recording you revisit, Tom’s greatness is emphasized again and again. We lost a truly special talent when Petty passed on October 2nd, 2017.

Rest east, Tom…

[Originally published 11/19/17]

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Thanks for posting.

Also great to hear Bob Dylan covering Learning to Fly after TP died.  I was not aware of that.  And I like the Dylan did the "rockin' " version instead of acoustic LTF (I like both versions, but I felt TP could have gone back to the rockin' version at some point). 

Hard to know what TPATH would have been like with Dave Grohl on drums full time, but there's no doubt that the SNL version of Honey Bee is their best ever, and a lot of that is driven by Grohl's high-energy drumming.  He definitely had the right feel for that song, and the rest of the band seemed to respond to it.  On the other hand, Grohl's performance on YDKHIF (also on SNL) was lackluster, but to be fair Stan and Steve didn't do much for that song either, IMO.   Probably Steve played it the best, but it's never been a big favorite of mine, especially in terms of the drumming.   

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9 hours ago, TheSameOldDrew said:

Hard to know what TPATH would have been like with Dave Grohl on drums full time, but there's no doubt that the SNL version of Honey Bee is their best ever, and a lot of that is driven by Grohl's high-energy drumming.  He definitely had the right feel for that song, and the rest of the band seemed to respond to it.  On the other hand, Grohl's performance on YDKHIF (also on SNL) was lackluster, but to be fair Stan and Steve didn't do much for that song either, IMO.   Probably Steve played it the best, but it's never been a big favorite of mine, especially in terms of the drumming.   

Yes. It's interesting, in hindsight. Like I've said elsewhere when this was discussed, at the time Grohl felt like the perfect man for the job in some way, given his attack and at least somewhat Stan like temper and approach. A man worthy the task. At the same time it felt too late. See, already in the aftermath of the Lynne era, there was this certain feeling that Tom was really looking for something else, something new. Both in his rhythm section and his line of songs, him/them entering a new phase, at least in terms of said drums.

As discussed, this may be overly obvious seen from the vista of here and now, but already then, I remember, it seemed Tom's experience with Lynne, or just his general outlook, where he was in life had turned him suddenly (well..) more favorable towards a time keeping boom-smack-boom-smack sonic ideal.* Some of us did probably wonder, at least slightly, how the magical sound of ITGWO album really left any room for Stan's personal magic and what that meant for the future. All in all of course, back then, at least to me, most things seemed to suggest that Stan leaving the band really was musical rather than personal, when in fact it probably was both.** The release of YDKHIF then, from the first smack, really seemed to close the case. 

Given that background, it was obviously as puzzling as it was exciting to tune in for SNL and find no other than Dave Grohl behind the kit, reading that at least for a short moment he was considered for the job. "What?! Man, didn't they just spend the better part of a decade slowly working themselves out of that line of aeastitics anyway..??" Well, some of us simply thought that TP had decided on a new path with his rhytm section, production style.. Cutting Stan some slack even, in a way, since then it was not personal anyway.. (relief to some of us, not yet familiar with Stan's frosty relationship with Mike and all that..) And then, there at SNL, for a short moment it seemed like they were not about to abandon the "wild child", integral drumming after all... Very confusing that was. Of course in hindsight, with Bisquera sitting in also and Steve fairly soon finding his place and the years passing.. it seems obvious that whatever change in sonic/drums  preferenses that hit TP around the time for his TW/JL experience, was to become more or less the "new deal". Dave would not have made it, stylistically, any further (or happier?) than Stan would've, for the better parts of what was to come (all the way up to Hypnotic Eye, where again a slight door seems to open..). 

For a moment there, excited as I was for the energy of it all, given the feeling at the time, it almost felt like a slap in Stan's face.  I mean, just moments after he let go, after some 6 years of haning on despite next to nothing new to do or to work with, the guys go on national television, cranking it up and signaling they were still lean and mean positively rocking with the drums as a fellow instrument. I remember feeling very odd at the time. Again, hindsight does make everything easier.

 

 

-----

* The drums as more of a steady hanger than an integral piece of apparel in it's own right, to paraphrase myself. A sturdy fixed skeleton on which to hang the ensambles on, rather than a working with an outfit that kept itself in suitable swagger. Geeze.. the methaphors of it all...

**If anything, maybe Stan gradually gravitating away from TPATH orbit - on a personal level, what with his relation to Tom and Mike and what have you - may actually have helped strengthening and specify what may be viewed as Tom's new approach to the drums. On the other hand, Tom doing what he did with Jeff, working with that newfound inspiration and method, that style, if you like, at the same time excluding Stan, may again turn the instigating momentum over on Tom anyway... So it certainly feels fair to say that the split happened for both musical and personal reasons and from both sides to a degree. No surprises there. 

 

 

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4 hours ago, Shelter said:

Yes. It's interesting, in hindsight. Like I've said elsewhere when this was discussed, at the time Grohl felt like the perfect man for the job in some way, given his attack and at least somewhat Stan like temper and approach. A man worthy the task. At the same time it felt too late. See, already in the aftermath of the Lynne era, there was this certain feeling that Tom was really looking for something else, something new. Both in his rhythm section and his line of songs, him/them entering a new phase, at least in terms of said drums.

As discussed, this may be overly obvious seen from the vista of here and now, but already then, I remember, it seemed Tom's experience with Lynne, or just his general outlook, where he was in life had turned him suddenly (well..) more favorable towards a time keeping boom-smack-boom-smack sonic ideal.* Some of us did probably wonder, at least slightly, how the magical sound of ITGWO album really left any room for Stan's personal magic and what that meant for the future. All in all of course, back then, at least to me, most things seemed to suggest that Stan leaving the band really was musical rather than personal, when in fact it probably was both.** The release of YDKHIF then, from the first smack, really seemed to close the case. 

Given that background, it was obviously as puzzling as it was exciting to tune in for SNL and find no other than Dave Grohl behind the kit, reading that at least for a short moment he was considered for the job. "What?! Man, didn't they just spend the better part of a decade slowly working themselves out of that line of aeastitics anyway..??" Well, some of us simply thought that TP had decided on a new path with his rhytm section, production style.. Cutting Stan some slack even, in a way, since then it was not personal anyway.. (relief to some of us, not yet familiar with Stan's frosty relationship with Mike and all that..) And then, there at SNL, for a short moment it seemed like they were not about to abandon the "wild child", integral drumming after all... Very confusing that was. Of course in hindsight, with Bisquera sitting in also and Steve fairly soon finding his place and the years passing.. it seems obvious that whatever change in sonic/drums  preferenses that hit TP around the time for his TW/JL experience, was to become more or less the "new deal". Dave would not have made it, stylistically, any further (or happier?) than Stan would've, for the better parts of what was to come (all the way up to Hypnotic Eye, where again a slight door seems to open..). 

For a moment there, excited as I was for the energy of it all, given the feeling at the time, it almost felt like a slap in Stan's face.  I mean, just moments after he let go, after some 6 years of haning on despite next to nothing new to do or to work with, the guys go on national television, cranking it up and signaling they were still lean and mean positively rocking with the drums as a fellow instrument. I remember feeling very odd at the time. Again, hindsight does make everything easier.

 

 

-----

* The drums as more of a steady hanger than an integral piece of apparel in it's own right, to paraphrase myself. A sturdy fixed skeleton on which to hang the ensambles on, rather than a working with an outfit that kept itself in suitable swagger. Geeze.. the methaphors of it all...

**If anything, maybe Stan gradually gravitating away from TPATH orbit - on a personal level, what with his relation to Tom and Mike and what have you - may actually have helped strengthening and specify what may be viewed as Tom's new approach to the drums. On the other hand, Tom doing what he did with Jeff, working with that newfound inspiration and method, that style, if you like, at the same time excluding Stan, may again turn the instigating momentum over on Tom anyway... So it certainly feels fair to say that the split happened for both musical and personal reasons and from both sides to a degree. No surprises there. 

 

 

God, I wish I had your ear for this stuff.  Really enjoy the insight you add to these posts Shelter! :D 

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As Shelter mentions there is a link for another article with Bob covering LTF.  For those that forgot to click* and prosperity:

https://liveforlivemusic.com/news/bob-dylan-covers-tom-petty/ and I will try and add the Dylan cover below to the cover thread..

 

* I had the RS issue with Bob and Tom for decades, foolishly a few years ago and before Tom passed I tossed my old RS collection in the recycle bin as my lovely wife was in a de-cluttering phase. :(  Could kick myself if I was more flexible... :( 

Spoiler

Bob Dylan Honors Fallen Friend Tom Petty With “Learning To Fly” Cover In CO [Watch]

Andrew O'Brien | Sunday, October 22nd, 2017
petty

On the day of Tom Petty‘s death earlier this month, fellow music and cultural icon Bob Dylan issued a comment to Rolling Stone: “It’s shocking, crushing news. I thought the world of Tom. He was a great performer, full of the light, a friend, and I’ll never forget him.” Though short and sweet, it was more of a comment than Dylan will offer on just about anything these days (even his Nobel Prize acceptance last year was famously delayed).

How Tom Petty’s “Free Fallin’” Went From A Studio Joke To A Worldwide Smash Hit

Last night, during a performance at 1stBank Center in Broomfield, CO, Dylan actualized his praise for Petty, making a rare update to his live setlist, closing out his three-song encore with one of Tom’s tunes: The Heartbreakers’ “Learning To Fly.”

You can watch Bob Dylan cover Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers’ “Learning To Fly” at Broomfield Colorado’s 1stBank Center via YouTube user Recreate Magazine:

Tom Petty and Bob Dylan’s extensive musical careers crossed paths on numerous occasions over the years. In the late 80’s, Dylan mounted the “True Confessions Tour,” a stretch of shows backed by Petty and the Heartbreakers. The tour also featured numerous appearances by Fleetwood Mac vocalist and mutual friend Stevie Nicks. The two appeared on the cover of Rolling Stone in the summer of 1986 to support the collaborative tour.

petty-dylan-rollingstone.jpg?resize=555%

rs-8585-petty624-1355431951.jpg?resize=7

Petty and Dylan later joined forces with George Harrison of The Beatles, Jeff Lynne of Electric Light Orchestra, and Roy Orbison to form supergroup The Traveling Wilburys, who recorded two full-length albums of their own.

Bob Dylan Adds Run Of 5 New York City Shows To 2017 Fall Tour With Mavis Staples

Below, you can see a setlist from Dylan’s Broomfield performance. His Fall tour with Mavis Staples continues on Monday, October 23rd in Omaha, NE. For a full list of upcoming Bob Dylan tour dates, head to his website.

Bob Dylan Setlist 1st Bank Center, Broomfield, CO, USA 2017, Never Ending Tour

[h/t – Rolling Stone]

[Cover photo – Paul Natkin/WireImage]

 

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50 minutes ago, Shelter said:

Not sure what you think you don't hear properly... but I wish you did too. :D

Thanks, though, I think.

I enjoy music greatly and the Petty Shed is one of my favorites to visit.   I enjoy Stan and the New Guy in equal measure. I can't see  hear a significant difference in style between them. Steve seems possibly a more powerful drummer as he is more stout in the chest. But I can't hear a major style difference in playing for the two even when listening to the same song...  maybe if I listen to a live recording of American Girl I would pick something up but I doubt it....   

I love Buddy Guy and can hear Stevie Ray borrowing from his sound and as a deceitful, but Albert King and Buddy sound very similar to me in their playing style (voice is a differnt matter.) Sure BB has a different sound as does Clapton and I can tell those kind of things apart.

Back to TPHB; I can hear Howie's beautiful harmonies but pull him out of the band and stylistically its an amalgamation if Scott T is there or not or Ron is back in the fold as far as live productions go.  I guess I'm too much a fanboy to discern say a 97 Fillmore show from a later day  Fonda Theater (OK I have not direct compared the two but you get the gist...)   

 

PS its a high compliment. ;) or at least intended as such. 

PPS I can tell Mudcrutch from Heartbreakers although there are a few Mudcrutch songs that belonged on Petty albums imho- can't say which off the top but I suppose the two versions of Trailer seem close despite different drummers and Bass players etc. 

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3 hours ago, Hoodoo Man said:

 I enjoy Stan and the New Guy in equal measure. I can't see  hear a significant difference in style between them. Steve seems possibly a more powerful drummer as he is more stout in the chest. But I can't hear a major style difference in playing for the two even when listening to the same song...  maybe if I listen to a live recording of American Girl I would pick something up but I doubt it....   

I have a much different take on the drummers.  To my ears, Stan was much more creative, and had a better "feel" for the songs than Steve.   Steve I hear as more mechanical, more precise than Stan but less artistic.  Now when Steve was playing a song already laid down by Stan or someone else, he did a pretty good job of imitating that drummer, though I still feel he sounds mechanical and over-uses the bass drum.  In laying down a new drum part of a new song, I found Steve's creativity severely lacking compared with Stan's. 

On all of the studio albums except "Hypnotic Eye" (where Steve's drumming is terrific) I felt that Stan would have done a better job.  And in concert I felt that Stan did a better job, leaving more room for the bass guitar and other instruments in the song.  One notable exception where Steve did a better job with the live version of an existing song was "Free Fallin'".  This was due to the fact that Steve was willing to use the best of Phil Jones' drum parts (as on the FMF album), while Stan refused to do any of Jones' drum parts and didn't replace them with anything nearly as good as what Jones had done.   

     

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8 hours ago, Shelter said:

Some of us did probably wonder, at least slightly, how the magical sound of ITGWO album really left any room for Stan's personal magic and what that meant for the future

As I recall, Stan was not happy with the way Jeff Lynne wanted to have him lay down the drum part on its own.  Stan much preferred being able to play at the same time as the rest of the band, as with Iovine or later with Rubin (on "Mary Jane's Last Dance").  But I've also heard that Stan tried to confound Lynne a bit by laying down a very complex drum track for "Learning To Fly", which was actually used and works well IMO.  In fact the drummer for Bob Dylan seems to have copied the Stan LTF drum track pretty closely, and it works there too. 

I did find it a bit sad that TP only did LTF "acoustic" after Stan left, as if he didn't want to tempt Steve to imitate Stan's drum part on that song.   Though I do like the acoustic version of LTF, as well as the more "rockin' " version (as on the album and on the tours with Stan).     

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5 hours ago, Hoodoo Man said:

PPS I can tell Mudcrutch from Heartbreakers although there are a few Mudcrutch songs that belonged on Petty albums imho- can't say which off the top but I suppose the two versions of Trailer seem close despite different drummers and Bass players etc. 

To my ears the original Trailer B-side (of Don't Come Around Here No More) eventually issued on "Playback" sounds much better than the Mudcrutch 2 version.   It's not even close.   Though it's not the drummers that make the difference on that song. 

In terms of drumming, in his first stint as the Mudcrutch drummer (pre-TPATH), Randall Marsh's drumming was creative and interesting - but to me seemed at odds with the song being played.  When Mudcrutch reunited several decades later, Marsh had deliberately become a much more "basic" drummer (presumably at TP's request).  Frankly I liked Randall's earlier, more creative drumming more.  It might have been somewhat at odds with the song, but overall I don't find Mudcrutch songs particularly interesting, so Randall's early drumming at least gave us a reason to listen.  Sorry if that's harsh and sounds strange coming from a die-hard TPATH fan, but that's how I view the whole Mudcrutch v. TPATH thing.     

 

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Aha, yes indeedy... Same Old Drew's recent find (14th Nov) in the interviews thread. 

So, ha, if I was feeling combative (which I'm not :-) ) I'd ask you why you call this "basic"? Such wild talk! Maybe one person's basic is another's refined style? (Q: was Steve Job's black top outfit "basic", or did he "lack creativity"? A: poured his creativity into product design. Oh, no, I've created a terrible example, which undercuts my point.)

Screenshot_20191121-145504.thumb.jpeg.9ce51fe75315c3f0e83c731b18feba40.jpeg

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BigBlueSky, exactly - TP wanted Randall Marsh to change his drumming for the re-united Mudcrutch.  But what TP considered "overplaying", a lot of people would consider "interesting" while they would consider the alternative "boring" (or "basic"). 

As a point of interest, when Randall first heard Mudcrutch, what stood out to him was TP's bass playing (apparently someone else was doing the lead singing at that point).  But I'm pretty sure that Benmont has said that when he first heard Mudcrutch, what stood out to him was Randall's drumming.  And when I listen to the Mudcrutch tracks on the Playback album, I agree that Randall's drumming stands out and is very interesting.  Though I also say it's "at odds with the song" in that I start listening to the drumming more than the song itself.  Perhaps that is because those songs are not that great, however. 

When it was announced that Mudcrutch was re-uniting, I thought "Great, now we'll hear some creative drumming for the first time since Stan was there".  But I was very disappointed that Randall's drumming now sounded very generic, very basic, to me quite boring.   I'm not sure if TP really meant for the drumming to become boring ever since Stan was there, but he did seem to want a different type of drummer than Stan. 

Some people have even suggested that Steve could have been more creative in his drumming with TPATH, but that TP was telling him to be more basic.  I don't know if that was the case, or if Steve was just playing as he felt was best.  But it is interesting when comparing Stan and Steve in TPATH to also note that Randall's drumming style changed from pre-TPATH Mudcrutch to re-united Mudcrutch.       

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Gosh, Tom was a real control freak in every aspect of the band. It breaks my heart that the estate has treated the legacy so shoddy.  I bought a second copy of the LTD edition lito mega book AAT set thinking it would be worth some coin in 10-15 years but they are STILL Selling the "LTD numbered editions" diluting out any possible value.  

I placed an order in the Petty store a month ago and was very promptly charged for a pint glass and shirt but I to date have no product or expectation of seeing tracking any time soon. It will likely be Xmas when it comes and i don't mean Dec. I mean it will be a long forgotten and a present to myself when it arrives....  Truly sad what has become of the "brand" between the two box sets (yes I get it was an agreement between MCA/WB to allow cross pollination of material to the two sets) But we are so used to getting new material every 5 year and then we have suddenly two box sets but one has one new track and is a greatest hits??? :( 

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1 hour ago, Hoodoo Man said:

Gosh, Tom was a real control freak in every aspect of the band.

I don't know if that's sarcasm, but I wouldn't say Tom was a control freak.  He did say he always wanted to be in a band, rather than solo + paid sidemen, and I assume that meant he wanted to get input from all the band members rather than controlling every sound they played.  On the other hand, I do think that Tom was to a large extents a "perfectionist", as is true of virtually every successful band leader.  In fact a lot of band leaders come off as "jerks" because they are so demanding of musical perfectionism. 

I don't think Tom every entered "jerk" territory (at least not permanently) but he had his own vision of the type of music he wanted to make.  And I do think that having the "solo" album success of FMF and WF put him in a position to feel that his vision should take precedence over the band's vision.  That's a natural evolution and I think he even pushed back on himself a bit in trying to do "band" stuff (having Stan sing lead, featuring Benmont on keys, having Howie do co-vocals, playing a song written by Scott, etc.) including re-uniting Mudcrutch where the spotlight was not so much on him.  Still, if he told Randall he was "overplaying" on the early songs, that could have merely been a helpful tip, but it also could have been viewed as a "control" thing.  

Either way, I think that after the 1980's TP was not as interested in creative drum contributions and wanted the rest of the song to be more of the feature.  He did after all play the drums himself on Highway Companion.  Is that a "control freak" thing or just that he felt the best way to get the drum sound he wanted was to play them himself?  TP was the important element in the songs, so if he wanted more input on the drums, that's what was going to happen.   Which may have been the biggest source of friction between Stan and himself, at the time of their break.  As a fan of both TP and the HBs, I would have liked it if TP had been interested in more creativity in the drumming; also in a setlist which was not so "hits heavy" tour after tour after 1995, but could respect his own deep catalog and play those lesser known songs.  But with TP we were glad to get what we could get, and unfortunately now he's gone.        

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I know, right? 

First, oh whaaat can't the TP website even efficiently sell merch?? I get it that some releases are "delayed" (though this is breaking our fragile hearts all over again). But delays on t-shirts & pint glasses? Come on, tompetty.com, just do better. Sounds like they can't even organise a pissup in a brewery, at this stage. 

Second, I find it endlessly interesting how they evolved over time (& I'm thinking I'm not Robinson Crusoe here, on that). Especially, for me, the change from being skinny bass player who wrote songs... to lead singer, writer, rhythm guitarist. Then into solo work. I know it's a tale as old as time "a band signs to record label & then one musician is singled out & somehow sells the others out..." Often told from point of view that this is a Bad Idea leading to internal tension if not Band's Breakdown.  But on other hand, encouraging talent & leadership is a very Good Thing too. Even in skinny shy bass players.

Sorry, I just can't begin to think of TP as a baddie. At all. Or any of the fellas like that, really. What with being my favorite band and all, I'm quite prepared to wear rise tinted glasses & focus on seeing them as almost too good to be true. There's enough gritty realism around! I'm keeping this! Besides, they were a long-term band, - 4 to 5 decades whereas many bands last 4 to 5 years (or 4 to 5 months - or gigs!). That says something for compatibility & camaraderie. 😉

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I was not being sarcastic in calling him a control freak, I'm not calling him a jerk either but he did sort of keep a big damper on The Dirty Knobs while he was alive which is a shame as it took me a long time to find out about this side project for Mike. 

Tom was an amazing human being but some of the tracks he felt were not worthy of release are simply stunning. But, when you look at how much Mike has matured as a singer (and producer) since joining FM it puts Mike in a under valued light IMHO.  I start to feel Tom only allowing Mike to do lead vocal on one track in the entire catalog (Does Mike even take lead on any of the Mudcrutch songs - I think not) is a bit depressing. Further, I don't think Mike did much singing besides rare backing vocals live either. 

Mike was always the co-captain and deeply appreciated by Tom and us fans, but as I learn more and more about Mike now and see his bathroom jams it bothers me at least a little how talented a singer Ben, Mike and even Ron Blair are, yet they were simply side men for Tom Petty and The Hearbreakers. Sidemen for sure is overly harsh as Mike and others are credited for the songs they wrote and clearly Tom valued their input (drumming aside ;) )  They were much more than a backing band and Tom always gave a lot of love to the boys in intros and interviews but Mike and Ben are developing very impressive solo careers and Mike is moving to the upper echelon of rock having joined FM and being part of that history not to mention being exposed to that set of fans.  I'm not a big fan of FM but Mike is really shining in that role as new lead guitar and doing vocals on at least Oh Well , but he is clearly a co-star and not a bacbking member in the side stage there. (Yes he was a star in TPHB and got lots of screen time but FM puts him in a new light for  a lot of fans. 

I've also enjoyed the subtle singing of Ben on his first solo album as well as the occasional cover of him doing catalog songs from the HB. I know he sang on 'Welcome to Hell' and crushed it on  #2. But aside for getting extra attention with Ben's boogie, and the odd solo within songs he didn't have much in the way of the lime light or singing with Tom.  Sure he got to jam on a lot of songs but that was part of a jam and not center stage as he was always trading off with Mike and Tom etc.   Just my opinion. 

Tom is my favorite artist of all time and only John Lee Hooker and Buddy Guy come close for me liking damn near everything they have done in their career...  for me that is esteemed territory.  The Doors, Zep and other bands that I also adore have some stinkers on albums but for Tom it was basically all diamonds for me. ;) 

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17 hours ago, Big Blue Sky said:

Sounds like they can't even organise a pissup in a brewery, at this stage. 

Not to be like that, but in my experience that would go for most all stages. The .com/HCC skits always was the parsimonious clunker to the majestic mother ship. If at times with new cool flames covering the lack of performance. Basically, if you think TP was a control freak or a perfectionist, look no further than the semi social grease monkeys at the TP site/club/shop for a brief idea of what he let pass for acceptable at the worst of times. I always wushed he would've told his official .com peeps to "be more basic" and just.. well.. officiate.

It's a good thing he never treated his music anywhere near as carelessly. Personally I feel be really was a control freak. One who used to like living drummers, but who gradually came to shift preference on that particular issue. He had a vision of what he wanted and what he wanted to put his name on. A very far reaching level of control and the unusual level of integrity and charm that was his (in all fields but IT managing seemingly, where his name at times went with some crappy product) is really beyond doubt in the case of TP, I think. For better or worse. Mostly better, ey?

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