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Tom's childhood home might be becoming a museum!

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If this turns out to be true it will be too cool  Looks like the current owner was on TPN and the buyer arranged the deal without a realtor putting it on the market. Seems like the intent is to turn it into a Gainsville music museum! This will make it much less creepy to take pictures of the place in the future LOL  

https://www.gainesville.com/news/20190611/up-for-sale-tom-pettys-childhood-home?fbclid=IwAR1DOoA_TbLtXaaGsYZB11WIHf4HGFqinWrlSGuu743qfTRHEDTtgQG5NaE

full article in hidden comment below. 

 

Spoiler

 

Up for sale: Tom Petty’s childhood home

By Andrew Caplan 

Posted at 3:47 PMUpdated at 4:32 PM
   

A California man says he’s made an offer and put a down payment on the home.

Rock ‘n’ roll legend Tom Petty’s childhood home in Gainesville is up for sale and a “super fan” from California wants to buy it.

Kevin Beauchamp, a California-based real estate agent and self-proclaimed super fan, says he has put a down payment on the home in northeast Gainesville, where the “American Girl” singer spent his childhood.

Petty was born and raised in Gainesville and formed the band Mudcrutch early in his musical career. He later performed with Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers and the 1980s supergroup The Traveling Wilburys alongside Bob Dylan, Beatles guitarist George Harrison and Roy Orbison.

Petty died in October 2017 at age 66 after an accidental overdose.

“I’ve been a fan since the debut LP,” Beauchamp said.

The home at 1715 NE Sixth Terrace was never publicized for sale. Current owner Brandy Clark said she was in a Petty fan club Facebook page and mentioned she might sell the property. She was quickly swarmed with emails and interested buyers.

Within a week, word got to Beauchamp, who said he quickly made an offer of $175,000 and put a down payment. He said he has a contract to buy the home and could take ownership within 45 days. I jumped through all the hoops,” he said.

Beauchamp said he’s working with Petty fans Joanne Davis, a New York resident, and Jeff Goldstein, president of the nonprofit Gainesville Music History Foundation, and hopes to have the property labeled a historical landmark with help from the city. Together, he said, the trio will raise funds to help purchase and maintain the home.

The property could be released to and managed by Goldstein’s nonprofit. Goldstein has previously discussed creating a Gainesville music museum, which would include honoring Petty and other notable local musicians.

Last year, the city of Gainesville put on a two-day Tom Petty birthday bash to honor the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee. The festival brought scores of Petty fans to the area and it also included renaming Northeast Park, located near the home, to Tom Petty Park. Some of Petty’s family members were in attendance, including his daughter and brother.

Fans then went by Clark’s house to take photos, which she says can sometimes be uncomfortably common. Much of the inside of the home has been remodeled over the years but still has the original pink tile in the bathroom.

Beauchamp traveled to Gainesville for the bash and visited the home but didn’t go inside, he said. During the two-day festival, Clark’s mailbox was stolen by a fan. Beauchamp and others bought her a new one.

Gainesville Mayor Lauren Poe said the city is open to discussions and helping with any goals Beauchamp and the nonprofit have, but also need to be cautious in creating any sort of tourist destination in the middle of a residential area. It would also go before the City Commission.

The city had a somewhat similar project with the A. Quinn Jones house, at 1013 NW Seventh Ave., by turning the former Lincoln High School principal’s home into a historical museum. That property, however, doesn’t have close of neighbors and wouldn’t attract as many tourists.

“We would need to be much more sensitive and really make sure we work with all the immediate neighbors to make sure they want this in their neighborhood,” Poe said.

 

 

 

 

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Not sure what drama lies beneath this one, but I've been seeing people post on the TPN page not to post the story. Not sure the back story on this but this strikes me as a very positive thing for Gainesville.  Not sure if they had hoped to do a big reveal or if its somehow not a done deal.   Just wanted to toss this in to the mix but I cant imagine there is not a P&S agreement and mortgage in place to get mentioned in a news paper article.... 😕 

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On 12 June 2019 at 7:01 AM, Hoodoo Man said:

Seems like the intent is to turn it into a Gainsville music museum! This will make it much less creepy* to take pictures of the place in the future LOL  

  Reveal hidden contents

 

Up for sale: Tom Petty’s childhood home

By Andrew Caplan 

Posted at 3:47 PMUpdated at 4:32 PM
   

A California man says he’s made an offer and put a down payment on the home.

Rock ‘n’ roll legend Tom Petty’s childhood home in Gainesville is up for sale and a “super fan” from California wants to buy it.

Kevin Beauchamp, a California-based real estate agent and self-proclaimed super fan, says he has put a down payment on the home in northeast Gainesville, where the “American Girl” singer spent his childhood.

Petty was born and raised in Gainesville and formed the band Mudcrutch early in his musical career. He later performed with Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers and the 1980s supergroup The Traveling Wilburys alongside Bob Dylan, Beatles guitarist George Harrison and Roy Orbison.

Petty died in October 2017 at age 66 after an accidental overdose.

“I’ve been a fan since the debut LP,” Beauchamp said.

The home at 1715 NE Sixth Terrace was never publicized for sale. Current owner Brandy Clark said she was in a Petty fan club Facebook page and mentioned she might sell the property. She was quickly swarmed with emails and interested buyers.

Within a week, word got to Beauchamp, who said he quickly made an offer of $175,000 and put a down payment. He said he has a contract to buy the home and could take ownership within 45 days. I jumped through all the hoops,” he said.

Beauchamp said he’s working with Petty fans Joanne Davis, a New York resident, and Jeff Goldstein, president of the nonprofit Gainesville Music History Foundation, and hopes to have the property labeled a historical landmark with help from the city. Together, he said, the trio will raise funds to help purchase and maintain the home.

The property could be released to and managed by Goldstein’s nonprofit. Goldstein has previously discussed creating a Gainesville music museum, which would include honoring Petty and other notable local musicians.

Last year, the city of Gainesville put on a two-day Tom Petty birthday bash to honor the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee. The festival brought scores of Petty fans to the area and it also included renaming Northeast Park, located near the home, to Tom Petty Park. Some of Petty’s family members were in attendance, including his daughter and brother.

Fans then went by Clark’s house to take photos, which she says can sometimes be uncomfortably common. Much of the inside of the home has been remodeled over the years but still has the original pink tile in the bathroom.

Beauchamp traveled to Gainesville for the bash and visited the home but didn’t go inside, he said. During the two-day festival, Clark’s mailbox was stolen by a fan. Beauchamp and others bought her a new one.

Gainesville Mayor Lauren Poe said the city is open to discussions and helping with any goals Beauchamp and the nonprofit have, but also need to be cautious in creating any sort of tourist destination in the middle of a residential area. It would also go before the City Commission.

The city had a somewhat similar project with the A. Quinn Jones house, at 1013 NW Seventh Ave., by turning the former Lincoln High School principal’s home into a historical museum. That property, however, doesn’t have close of neighbors and wouldn’t attract as many tourists.

“We would need to be much more sensitive and really make sure we work with all the immediate neighbors to make sure they want this in their neighborhood,” Poe said.

 

 

 

 

 

For some reason this makes me belly-laugh :lol: (though in a perfectly normal way - thank you very much)!  

When I was in my 20s, we rented a historic house beside a Saturday market. Buskers (ranging in talent & skill) outside our window from 6am were painful. One busker played blues at mid-morning = a joy. So tourists incessantly taking photos of the lovely house were no big deal by comparison. We tried to have empathy, as it was mainly just on Saturdays. Shut the lace curtains. Repeatedly cleared all their discarded milkshake & kebab sticks & crepe wrappers (from inside our fence) every couple of hours so rubbish wouldn't fester. Our "we're wearing sunglasses & ignoring you" images are doubtless photo bombing many, many, tourist images.

...so, hey, Gainesville people, just you try buskers from dawn outside your Petty house / musical museum! Then tell us how you feel about drive-by photos. 

  • I do love idea of museum to honour the past and encourage the present and future musical heritage. 
  • They do need to invest in planning approval & a management strategy. It's not just red-tape & paperwork - it helps long term success. 
  • Or the neighbours' peace will be shattered all down the street ...parking in a residential area ... issues of long-term funding ...protecting historical sites from being even slightly tacky ...finding real stuff to put on display behind the velvet rope ...finding ways to stop visitors touching / stealing that stuff... Maybe people will pay to see Tom's childhood bathroom & 1950s pink tiles? 
  • Maybe Gainesville's central music museum could be somewhere else with a better layout & design & an interesting collection of music stuff.  They could maybe then maintain childhood homes / venues (for those fabulous Gainesville musicians) as brief stops in organised museum tours. 

Still, I'm gonna say, there's a Bob Dylan story that may put all this in the shade. From my memory: someone wanted to buy Bob's childhood home in Hibbing, but owners repeatedly refused for 20 years. They were there first. Potential buyer didn't give up, instead buying the house next door - and living there. Whether anyone stared longingly over the fence is & in through the Zimmerman windows every night for 20 years is not reported. 

 

On a more cheerful note, I recently read a novel called Dumplin' - 2 main characters are teenage girls who both love Dolly Parton & her music. One is on a first date & no surprise, mentions Dolly, so her date asks her about being a die-hard Dolly Parton fan.

  • I feel an intense loyalty to her that I can't shake. "Okay, so here's the deal: yes. I am a huge Dolly Parton fan. But here's something you have to understand about Dolly Parton fans: we're nuts. And since there's a high level of crazy amongst us all, I am, in comparison, not as batshit as most. [....]
  • "Okay," he says. His brow crinkles together, and I can see he's really making an effort to understand. "Okay, but on, like, a scale of one to ten?" 
  • "On a scale of one to ten, ten being total nut job, I guess Ellen and I would be fours. Maybe fives? Mrs Dryver is a total eight, but not quite a nine because she hasn't had plastic surgery. Yet." 

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On 6/13/2019 at 8:41 PM, Big Blue Sky said:

Maybe Gainesville's central music museum could be somewhere else with a better layout & design & an interesting collection of music stuff.  They could maybe then maintain childhood homes / venues (for those fabulous Gainesville musicians) as brief stops in organised museum tours. 

Read here about the proposed site of the music foundation: http://www.gmhfi.org/

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