Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
nurktwin

Mike Campbell's fav records

Recommended Posts

Thanks! B)

Paul Butterfield Blues Band? Your second piece of info about them: they jammed with Bob Dylan in private during afternoon at Newport Folk Festival 1965. As they all got on great, Dylan he asked if they'd play with him for his festival gig. Or as it's more usually known: When Bob Dylan Went Electric. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On March 17, 2019 at 9:50 AM, Big Blue Sky said:

You would've heard Paul Butterfield singing & playing harp with The Band for Mystery Train. 

I can appreciate you sharing that but I didn't like it at all. Musically it sounded all right at first but the singing...those awful harmonies! It sounded like country music or bluegrass on steroids. Well, I realize it's mainly the band with Paul Butterfield so it's not a representation of his music.

cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

16 hours ago, MaryJanes2ndLastDance said:

Musically it sounded all right at first but the singing...those awful harmonies! It sounded like country music or bluegrass on steroids. Well, I realize it's mainly the band with Paul Butterfield so it's not a representation of his music.

That's The Band. I guess you had a typo. 

  1. To your ears the vocals of Paul Butterfield, Levon Helm & Rick Danko sound "awful"? Levon? 
  2. Well, if that's the case, we're in different universes & are coming at the whole genre of Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers' music in very different ways. Musical differences, indeed. I think the most gracious thing is for me to chose to say nothing more to you on the topic of Paul Butterfield or Mike Campbell's favorite record / musical influences. Nothing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Big Blue Sky said:

That's The Band. I guess you had a typo. 

Ha! The only group that's both Common and Proper nouns? I think...

5 minutes ago, Big Blue Sky said:

To your ears the vocals of Paul Butterfield, Levon Helm & Rick Danko sound "awful"? Levon?

Yes, horrible. I lasted about 2 minutes in and gave up. I couldn't take another moment of it.

5 minutes ago, Big Blue Sky said:

Well, if that's the case, we're in different universes & are coming at the whole genre of Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers' music in very different ways.

Yes! We're different people, of course we are.

6 minutes ago, Big Blue Sky said:

Musical differences, indeed.

I think this is the whole point unless message forums are meant to be...pun intended...Echo chambers. While Tom (and the band, not The Band) respected and loved his musical forebears, why should I respect or love them if they do nothing for me musically? It would be false or trying to, I don't know, curry favor with others but to what end, I couldn't say. It's these musical differences that make a message board worth visiting, it's the honest (and I would hope polite) expressions of one's opinions and conversing or civilly arguing that to me, make a board interesting. Too much of course and it can be unbalanced, that's why I think you need topics like Tom's haircut, or Classic Rock video or other music etc. and ideally a nice balance between all of these topics.

10 minutes ago, Big Blue Sky said:

I think the most gracious thing is for me to chose to say nothing more to you on the topic of Paul Butterfield or Mike Campbell's favorite record / musical influences. Nothing. 

I can appreciate that; my opinion or dismissal of Levon or whomever isn't a personal attack or insult to your or anyone's taste; I realize with the internet there's no social cues we'd be having in a face to face conversation; I don't think that's a blanket excuse to cover any online behavior, just that it seems that these disagreements or my distaste for the music and your incredulous response would be smoother in person than online. At the same time, harsh opinion or not, it's just that. An opinion. Someone could make a topic calling Hypnotic Eye a terrible record, dung on vinyl, etc. and I'd disagree but I wouldn't take it personally. It might make for interesting reading, it might not.

At the same time you could be simply saying anyone who dislikes the music sample you posted has such a different taste/view of the world that there's no common reference point to be had and therefore, instead of calling me bananas, you'd just as soon stop discussing Butterfield, the Band etc. because what's the point? What you perceive as Up to me is a pair of dirty socks; we may as well not be speaking the same language.

 I respect that too. I actually think that's what you're saying but wanted to be sure. 

Before I stop I hope you'll still discuss other topics, groups, etc. no matter how different our opinion is, but if not, that's your prerogative. Whew! Enough of my rambling. For the record too, I don't like Bob Dylan (maybe a song or two here or there, though I do like when other's cover him sometimes), that harmonica grates as does his voice.

cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

2 hours ago, MaryJanes2ndLastDance said:

At the same time you could be simply saying anyone who dislikes the music sample you posted has such a different taste/view of the world that there's no common reference point to be had and therefore, instead of calling me bananas, you'd just as soon stop discussing Butterfield, the Band etc. because what's the point? 

Ok. If you want to explain my own message back to me, go ahead.

Look, main point. So have you tracked down & listened to the musician / albums Mike Campbell mentioned yet? YouTube. Spotify. You'll hear "Born In Chicago" (that TPATH covers) track 1 on debut album. That might be interesting for you. 

 

You want my opinion? I included the "Mystery Train" clip as well as albums mentioned. I did this because it's an example of Paul Butterfield live on stage. Also, in my opinion, a) they are smokin' hot in that collaboration & b) PB shows us all what a gun (ie excellent) harp player he is, using it as a main instrument for solos & c) they all slay that song. 

In my opinion, if you don't like my musical recommendation, so what, you don't like it. I'm not losing sleep over your musical taste. But it's a bit brutally honest of you to say you think they're awful, when it's likely I think they are awesome. I'm saying, graciously, well, in that case, it's the end of road for me on that topic with you. 

 

Broader point. Have you perhaps ever watched the 1976 concert documentary "The Last Waltz" directed by Martin Scorsese? (The interview technique directly influenced Rob Reiner when making "Spinal Tap".) "Last Waltz" is where the "Mystery Train" clip came from. As it seems that song's new for you, it's possible you've not seen the concert yet. As my own recommendation, for what it's worth, everyone should see "Last Waltz", as it's fantastic. 

In my opinion, the music they create that night draws from the same mountain stream that TPATH drunk deeply from.  You know how at "Concert For George" there's a whole crowd of creative people who're George Harrison's musical peers? Well, it's the same for "Last Waltz". So for us, it's a rich sampler of musicians including Paul Butterfield, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, Dr John, Eric Clapton, Staple family, Van Morrison, Bob Dylan, Ronnie Hawk Hawkins and more. Not TPATH, but not a million miles away. These are people TPATH collaborated with, praised, dedicated songs to &/or covered songs by. Whether you personally respond to that music - or not - is up to you. In my opinion, it is self-evident that something special was created by a loose collaboration of people whose musical taste is matched by their skills & ability. And maybe that special, elusive, something somehow influenced TPATH. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm was born much too late to know The Band, but I simply love them.

But if all I ever heard of them was this track from The Last Waltz, I would hate them. :lol: The Last Waltz is a brilliant concert film, but this Butterfield guy - no matter how important he is historically, and I know he is - freaks me out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Big Blue Sky said:

Ok. If you want to explain my own message back to me, go ahead.

It's good to have a hobby.

11 hours ago, Big Blue Sky said:

But it's a bit brutally honest of you to say you think they're awful, when it's likely I think they are awesome. 

I'll say it again, I appreciate you sharing something. But to my ears it was really bad. I wasn't trying to be brutal about it though nor stomp on your taste...

11 hours ago, Big Blue Sky said:

Have you perhaps ever watched the 1976 concert documentary "The Last Waltz" directed by Martin Scorsese?

I've heard about it but never have.

11 hours ago, Big Blue Sky said:

So for us, it's a rich sampler of musicians including Paul Butterfield, Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, Dr John, Eric Clapton, Staple family, Van Morrison, Bob Dylan, Ronnie Hawk Hawkins and more. Not TPATH, but not a million miles away.

I understand all that but I don't feel it. To me, TPATH is a million miles away; aside from Zeppelin and the Ramones I don't know another band from the 70s that I actively listen to. There's something to me different with Tom's songwriting and the way the band came together setting them apart from Springsteen or Bob Seger, Eagles etc. One day I'll give the Butterfield band a listen because of that sample from the Mike interview but there's no hurry.

 

10 hours ago, TwoGunslingers said:

But if all I ever heard of them was this track from The Last Waltz, I would hate them. :lol:

Ha! Well, thanks for sharing that.

11 hours ago, Big Blue Sky said:

As it seems that song's new for you, it's possible you've not seen the concert yet. As my own recommendation, for what it's worth, everyone should see "Last Waltz", as it's fantastic. 

I have loved a lot of Scorsese films in the past so thanks for the recommendation.

cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Big Blue Sky said:

As my own recommendation, for what it's worth, everyone should see "Last Waltz", as it's fantastic. 

There is a lot to be said for that. This one is actually one of those things in life that goes beyond whether you find it fantastic or not. (Although, liking it helps some.) At least if you are a music fan with any interest in general rock universe navigation. See.. without The Band in general, their friends and allies, and perhaps that Last Waltz film in particular (as some sort of beacon at the end of a movement), it would be very hard to understand anything of what happened to rock music in the late 60 throughout the 70s and on, how the genuinely American folk rock developed and paved way for what was to become the Alternative Rock, the Americana craze of our times. Milestone material? Well.. Let's just say, trying to understand modern American rock without it, would like trying to understand modern sci-fi without the Alien trilogy.

On a more "Farming" level, The Last Waltz certainly helps, if mainly by association, in understanding the influences and style references that are soaking through so much of Tom's music. It may also be a pointer towards the rationale behind some of his choice of covers over the years - since, as much as he loved 50s blues rock and the British invasion stuff (in itself in part influenced by Bob and The Band and so on), Tom was himself definitely a child of his times, wasn't he? The traces of Bob, The Band, Butterfield, Bloomfield, Grateful Dead, Little Feat, JJ Cale and all this 70s Americana rock sentiments - the presence of all the who's-who in terms of various inventors of the folk rock scene - are loud and clear, all the way from the first chords of Mudcrutch*. I basically think this stuff was tremendously important to Tom and the guys! "The same mountain stream", yes... that is so very aptly put!

Good or bad - the Last Waltz is, if nothing more, splendid context.** No necessity or obligation to think or care about these things at all, of course. Music is fine as isolated bubbles too. I'm just saying.. if one has an itch... this film is one of the places to start the scratching.

That said, hearing that clip there out of context, I can agree it's not the proudest moment of either The Band or Butterfield. The don't exactly nail that song, IMO. And as for Butterfield in general, he sure was a key player and he contributed to a lot of cool stuff, but as a leading man and especially as a singer, I do think that he is slightly overrated. To me he is far from the only reason why his namnesake Blues Band is so groovy. Look more in ways of rhythm section and guitar to find my answers. Also. I'm no big fan of long instrumental harmonica jams, so that may be part of it.... 

Hm.. having said all this, the one thing that surprise me, though.. is that.. I can't think of all those perfect The Band covers that Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers surely must have pulled out over the years. There is some very strange absence there. A hole in my mind, surely.

 

----

* Come to think of it - slightly tweaked, a song like Up In Mississippi really could be a The Band song. I can hear their harmonies, the Weight or Cripple Creek style vibe taking that song to it's final destination.

**Another document that covers a slightly different limb of this alternative/Americana beast, a slightly more singer/songwriter oriented era and context, that is highly recommendable would be the Heartworn Highways movie. Ya all really need to see that one, if only for the fantastic studio photage of Larry Jon Wilson trying to nail Ohoopee River Bottom Land (that voice!?), of Guy Clark doing Forever, For Always, For Certain and Townes of course, the sob fest that is Townes Van Zandt's kitchen table take of Waitin' Around to Die. Oh man… I would link all those.. or the whole film.. but you all have to do some of the work yourself. Cruel world.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shelter summed it up.

Better songs (than the Mystery Train version from The Last Waltz) to get into The Band might be

  • Up on Cripple Creek,
  • Don't Do It,
  • The Weight and maybe
  • The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down.

If you care for a certain type of "Americana" music, it's almost impossible not to like these. And in the rare case you really don't, they are at least interesting signposts in the history of popular music. Although they're definitely much more than just that. ;)

Watching The Last Waltz might help understand the importance of The Band. The first song just kills. Having said that, it is, of course, a complicated or even troubled movie, or at least the history of its conception is. Fantastic as an end product nevertheless. And as far as music goes it's probably the single most important document of its time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Shelter said:

To me he is far from the only reason why his namnesake Blues Band is so groovy. Look more in ways of rhythm section and guitar to find my answers.

Well now I'm curious about this band, Butterfield Blues again.

3 hours ago, TwoGunslingers said:

Up on Cripple Creek

That's funny. Years ago during a jam session with friends, casual by a beach this guy pulls out Cripple Creek. I'd never heard it before, we played along; it was all right, it was more about trying to play the song as well as possible because it meant something to him to sing and play, it didn't make much of an impression on me. Well, enough of one for me to recognize the title all these years later.

3 hours ago, TwoGunslingers said:

If you care for a certain type of "Americana" music, it's almost impossible not to like these.

I don't think I do care for that "Americana" music overall with rare exception. I think TPATH are a much stranger band than people realize, or are distracted by the catchiness of the songs. Whatever it is, something sets them apart from their peers, maybe some foundational Floridian weirdness. I don't know.

cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Up on Cripple Creek,
  • Don't Do It,
  • The Weight and maybe
  • The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down.

Oh yes, these 4 are undeniably wonderful, aren't they? Or "Beautiful", as Mavis Staples breathes into her microphone at the end of Weight. 

From blues perspective, as well as Paul Butterfield, a shout-out for their performances with:

  • Muddy Waters (Mannish Boy) &
  • Eric Clapton (Further On Up The Road).

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, MaryJanes2ndLastDance said:

Well now I'm curious about this band, Butterfield Blues again.

That's funny. Years ago during a jam session with friends, casual by a beach this guy pulls out Cripple Creek. I'd never heard it before, we played along; it was all right, it was more about trying to play the song as well as possible because it meant something to him to sing and play, it didn't make much of an impression on me. Well, enough of one for me to recognize the title all these years later.

I don't think I do care for that "Americana" music overall with rare exception. I think TPATH are a much stranger band than people realize, or are distracted by the catchiness of the songs. Whatever it is, something sets them apart from their peers, maybe some foundational Floridian weirdness. I don't know.

cheers

There's no reason to put quotes around Americana. It's an actual genre of music, also known in it's earlier days as alt-country. 

And the Band isn't doesn't ever really tread into that genre. Outside of the odd number like "Evangeline", (which is great btw), they're just a nice amalgamation of rock, blues, folk and soul, that make their own brand and genre defining music. They're not really any country roots to be found in their music. It's not a bad thing but that's more of a keen observation from someone who loves Americana.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, martin03345 said:

There's no reason to put quotes around Americana. It's an actual genre of music, also known in it's earlier days as alt-country. 

And the Band isn't doesn't ever really tread into that genre. Outside of the odd number like "Evangeline", (which is great btw), they're just a nice amalgamation of rock, blues, folk and soul, that make their own brand and genre defining music. They're not really any country roots to be found in their music. It's not a bad thing but that's more of a keen observation from someone who loves Americana.

See, that's why I'm always having a hard time with stylistic categories. Don't want to go off-topic too much, but I always thought "Americana" means a blend of various American musical styles; I would not have thought country is a necessary ingredient, just the most common one. But maybe that's just me.

Let's just say that The Band were important pioneers for what later became known as alt.country and Americana.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×