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MaryJanes2ndLastDance

Thoughts on Playback

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Inspired by BobbyJames post about this set I figured now's a good time to share what I think of some of the songs on here.

I was very excited to own Playback and I recall opening the box up and taking the whole thing in. So many songs! So many unreleased songs or b-sides I'd never heard before! And the packagining, I liked the black and white minimal design with photos, and that book, a giant book full of song discussions!

I still have it at my parent's house, with my handwritten set list I recalled the next day after the 95 WF show I saw, though some of the discs are misplaced.

To this day Discs 5 & 6 are my favorite and while I might view the collection as a cash grab, back then I was happy to have so much TPATH to enjoy. 

The odd thing is, I recall hearing Come On Down To My House at the now long gone Polaris Amphitheater in Columbus, prior to the release. But when I looked back, the box set came out after the show. Perhaps I'd gotten an advanced copy at the time? I don't know, I could just be misremembering and loved Come On Down To My House so much that I think I heard it before when I hadn't. Anyway, if you want to see how much I enjoyed that show go here:

 

https://www.mudcrutch.com/forum/index.php?/topic/15617-thoughts-on-columbus-oh-show-from-1995/&tab=comments#comment-308271

 

 Did they play it on the radio? I don't know. But I swear I heard it before the show. Either way, the show was one of the best TPATH ones I'd seen. And the box set brought me a lot of joy over the years.

Christmas All Over Again---usually I think rock music mixes with Christmas about as well as horns and a TPATH tour but sometimes it works and this is one of them. It feels like you're riding in a sleigh with the band.

Casa Dega---One of my all time favorite TPATH songs; moody, strange, I didn't know if there really was a Casa Dega or not. Heard this believe it or not on the radio years and years ago and instantly liked it. Swamp weird song, parallel to Luna in its mood but different musically. Really good song.

Heartbreakers Beach Party---I really like this one. Fun, short! They even played a few times in '99! Is this the only drum break (besides the Apartment Song) in a Tom Petty song? Should've had more of 'em cause they're good. Like this tune.

Crackin' Up: I'm not much one for covers but this one is really good. The slinky riff, heavy groove, the way Tom sounds like he's sneering thorugh the song and then that chorus, man, what signging, I'm assuming that's Howie on there and I could see why so many swear by the man's vox!

Make that connection---Didn't care for this when I got this box set but I like it now. Country drawl. Some of it reminds me if he took the live extended monologue from Breakdown and turned it into a song. Except less frantic.

Down the Line---Reminds me of a Blues Brothers song. I think I didn't like it back when I first heard it but now I like the jaunty feel; it's a fun track.

Moon Pie----I could handle a whole album of Moon Pies/It Ain't Nothin' To Mes and Its Rainin' Again, Peace in LAs. Just an odd number, short enough to be weirdly fun but doesn't overstay.

Peace in LA---An interesting piece of music. Drums remind me of Nighwatchman. I like when the band gets a bit different like this. I usually try to avoid message music unless it's very general, I don't want to associate this music I enjoy with something that actually happened. I wonder if people who weren't around at the time would even know what this song is about?

I guess so much time has passed it just feels like a general sentiment and not connected to the riots. Either way, I like this one a lot, moody, weird. The talk about burning toast or whatever isn't good, inappropriate humor in this song relating to something serious.

If it had been a different topic, then I think it would've fit. But it's not enough to ruin the song. Again, I wonder how many people if they didn't know the origins of this song would even make any connection to a real life event. 

Y'know, it strikes me now this song reminds me of Lookin' For Daddy, that kind of drawn out weirdness.

It's Rainin' Again---an underrated classic. It actually mimics the sound and feel of rain with the music and lyrics, that droning feeling from rain hitting the house as you stay in on a gray day.

 I don't know what to say to You---awful Bob Dylan homage JUST TERRIBLE.

 

 Is there anyone who doesn't like On The Street? Man, this is a happy song. The music bounces along, this is a perfect TPATH song . It would be years till I realized it was Mudcrutch, so much for reading the accompanying book! Just as I write this, it occurs to me the Ramones could've done a fabulous cover of this. And they played it during the Fillmore run and that last show!

 Depot Street---track two and another winner! Boy, this is a good disc. I love how the band all comes in bit by bit, the fun lyrics, and boy, this is just a happy song. I really like it; for years I'd confuse Depot/On the street.

Cry to Me---thought this was a TPATH original when I first heard it. Don't really care for it. It's all right I suppose but nothing I seek otu to listen to when there's so much better music out there.

I Can't Fighgt It---Apparently I can't spell it either. Another good one! As underrated as You Tell Me or the Criminal Kind. This song rocks but in that TPATH way, somehow taking their influences and mixing them together into something else. And that piano

 

And I love how Tom's voice sings that melody line over the tight bouncy rhythm. I forgot all about this song but man it's good. Darn good. How about I just say it once here and stop since it applies to s omany of thes thunes...why didn't they ever play it?! The fade out on the track could've turned into one hell of a ajam between Mike, Bnemot and even Tom. Man! Residency hit! Picture ending a set with this? Or starting it? Give You Wreck Me a break! Anyway, picture that for nearly all these tunes on discs 5 & 6.

 

Keeping Me Alive---Was this one that Iovine kept off Long After Dark? I think it couldv'e fit as the last tune, wouldn't have felt out of place. I like it, upbeat yet mellow, an interesting contradiction. Good chorus! Really powerful.Good solo, nice Phil Jones percussion I'm assuming.

 

Turning Point----I really really like this song! One of their best unreleased tunes. This should've definitely made an album, Long After Dark again perhaps? Would've fit perfectly on Side B. It's amazing what Tom and the band could do with such simple chords and foundations, I like how succinct the lyrics are and the phrasing he uses.

Man, this is so damn good. Could've ended Long After Dark with this. What was Iovine (if it was him?) thinking? It's rare I think a song should be added to a TPATH album I'm happy with, but this should've made the record.

Doesn't this song make you feel good? What a nice little outro solo, could've been extended in concert.

Got My Mind Made Up----One of their heavier songs. Makes me think of the swamp. I like it! Fast, heavy and how fast they get to the chorus. Is that a record for transition from verse to chorus? I mean, that is fast! The guitar f/x in the background are great, and different for them. 

Ways to be Wicked---Ever read Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury? Great book. Maybe this place should have a Books to recommend and discuss topic. Then again, maybe not. Anyway, yes, this song is good.

Can't Get her out---Wasn't his from the Let Me Up sessions? Whatever it's from, it's fun to hear the band driving straight ahead again.

This kinda feels like Tom took the spoken verse parts of Here Comes My Girl and used that as a template for this song, took that part and injected it with steroids! Speaking of verse to chorus, this song starts out with the chorus! I like it, I could be wrong but I picture Stan really enjoying the hell out of this song. And that bridge, man...two excellent solos, Mike doing something supercharged but not Chuck Berry derivative and then Benmont's sweet sharp organ or what not! 

I like that ending too, feels like it could've been the last song of a set in the Stan era. Boy, this band changed quite a bit, compare this to Echo or the Last DJ! A lot of fun.

 

Travelin----Now if this was meant to be on Long After Dark then, well, I could see why it didn't make it. Sounds like a good track for Southern Accents though. I like how Tom's voice changes in the song. And those chord changes! It's a really good song. Man, what a box set! Jaunty, rocking country and Iove the harmony or choir voices in the background. Howie, correct? Good job.

 

Wooden Heart---I was shocked when a friend of mine pointed out this wasn't a Tom Petty song. I still like it, quite a bit! Very tender. Reminds me a bit of Only A Broken Heart. Or maybe it's just cause they both have Heart in the title. I like these types of short ballad songs, like Alright For Now. 

All right, this song nearly moves me to tears. It's precious, and fragile and Tom's voice, like a lullabye. It's so good.

God's Gift To Man---That opening riff sounds like something else they've done but I don't know what. You know, Tom is kinda known as singing with an empathy towards women so it's interesting and different to hear him, refreshing I guess, singing about the femme fatale. I like it. Not one of the better ones on here, almost a bit generic feeling, like a lesser version of Ways To Be Wicked or Can't Get Her Out. 

You Get Me High---I like the weird warping sound at the beginnig. Sounds like something you could end a concert with or play it as the second last song, it feels like things are wrapping up. Nice harmony singing or background vocals and chorus. I like this one. 

Come On Down To My House---One of their heaviest songs, perhaps the closest they came to punk rock. I always liked it. Great fuzzed up guitars! I'm glad they played this one on the WF tour and considered myself fortunate to hear it live, though it really feels like somehow I'd heard it before that concert.

You Come Through---I like tihs one a lot, from the groove to the false ending. Man, a lot of these playback songs would've rocked residencies! Oh well. Funky TPATH, an avenue they could've explored more...heck maybe they did with some as yet unheard of tunes.

Up in Mississppi Tonight----Depending on my mood I'll listen to this one. A nice little bit of country to close things out.

 

WAITING FOR TONIGHT: Perhaps Tom's best pop song he ever wrote. How this isn't a huge hit, played on the radio as much as Free Fallin' is a mystery to me. It should be HUGE. At least as popular as Stop Draggin' My Heart Around. It's so damn good. When Tom died they should've pulled this one out (radio stations) and played it. People would love it. I just don't get it. Interesting it had one performance with the Bangles. 

What do you think of Playback?

cheers

 

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@MaryJanes2ndLastDance the band did play "Come On Down to My House" at the 8-27-95 show at Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio as a sort of preview to the upcoming boxset. The set list from that night looks amazing, so if that was the show you were at -- or a night somewhere around that time -- then you definitely were in for a real treat!

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On 3/3/2019 at 3:36 PM, MaryJanes2ndLastDance said:

Keeping Me Alive---Was this one that Iovine kept off Long After Dark? I think it couldv'e fit as the last tune, wouldn't have felt out of place. I like it, upbeat yet mellow, an interesting contradiction. Good chorus! Really powerful.Good solo, nice Phil Jones percussion I'm assuming.

In the April '83 copy of Musician magazine, Tom said there were nineteen tracks recorded for Long After Dark.

Off-hand, I can recall the ten off the album, Keeping Me Alive, Turning Point, Keep a Little Soul, possibly Wild Thing and Stories We Can Tell (as they're in the studio footage). That's fifteen. 

(Playing "Keeping Me Alive" in Audiosurf is funny, because it causes the game to freak out and make the track run way too fast.)

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Right on MJ2LD! I share in your love of the Playback box set. It holds a special spot in my TP collection, as it's a real treasure trove and testament to the Heartbreakers catalog up to that point. The first American Treasure, as it were. It is interesting that it arrived just 2 years after the monumental Greatest Hits album. Apparently people were ready for a lot more Petty. I bought it when I was just a few years into my discovery of their music (that first flash of freedom), so it was overwhelming and wonderful at the time. So much music!!! So much investigating to do! It demanded a lot from the listener (not a casual listen), and I was up for the task. And back then, spending a lot of money of a set like that made it feel very valuable, like you were really investing into something. It certainly was a big deal to get it at 16 or 17 years old. Remember back in the 90's when a new CD was like $16.98...and a bigger collection like this was much pricier.

I'm also with you, in the fact that discs 5 and 6 are my absolute favorite things on Playback. I can play those and never get tired. I think it's because they feel like they could be independent/official TP albums. They're that good. These "leftovers or outtakes or missing children" are as good (if not better) as songs found on the regular albums, don't you think? And didn't they release  "Though the Cracks" and "Nobodys Children" as stand alone "albums" a few years ago? Maybe just digitally, can't remember.

 "I Can't Fight It" rocks. It's got that punchy and rowdy rock & roll attitude, underdog feeling, etc. This song in particular feels like it could be a connector between 70's Mudcrutch and the early Heartbreakers. Also pretty rare for a Petty song, with the usage of colorful language. Along with "Zero From Outer Space", these are the only two TP songs I can think of that drop the F-bomb....somewhat out of character for him.

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5 hours ago, nobodyinparticular said:

In the April '83 copy of Musician magazine,

I found this 'cause you mentioned it:

https://www.thepettyarchives.com/archives/magazines/1980s/1983-03-musician

"Working a song to death is pointless," says Petty, who bears no responsibility for the above analogy, and may throw up when he reads it. "You do a take and it has the magic or it doesn't. If you start listening to each instrument for what's wrong, it becomes sterile. Instead, you come back to the song later in a different frame of mind. You wait for the magic to happen rather than forcing it."

For example, take "A Wasted Life," the only slow song on Petty's latest album, Long After Dark (eighty percent live vocals). One night Petty was messing around in his basement, turned on his drum machine and tape deck, played a few chords on his synthesizer and began free associating lyrics. About fifteen minutes into the cassette, lo, there was grace: one complete verse and most of the chorus. Then one night the Heartbreakers were messing around in the studio. Stan Lynch hit the exact groove with his brushes, Benmont Tench hopped on it with the keyboard progression, Petty started singing, and pretty soon there was the song for the first time sounding the way it ought to outside of Petty's head. Grace again. Fortunately, the tape was rolling for most of it (they had to do a little doctoring) and the world is now blessed with one of those Tom Petty how-in-creation-did-he-twist-his-vocal-cords-around-that-emotion performances.

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Same article.

image.jpeg.6f40c11485210fe8ac410703b9f13b4f.jpeg

"Worst Of Tom Petty" haha. 

Their "worst" is still gonna be amazing. 

Also, about dropping the F-bomb in songs, yes, they're the only two songs I can think of too. Which is interesting, considering how often he seems to use it in interviews. Normally I'd say, well, musicians didn't  neccesarily want to be banned from TV / radio, or create unneccesary roadblocks to getting the songs out there. Was that it? But they didn't seem to care that much about rocking the boat on other occasions: cocaine (Listen To Her Heart); joint (You Don't Know How It Feels); scathing criticism of music biz (entire Last DJ album).

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I've got to say, Playback was my favorite box set until An American Treasure came along.  I have a lot of box sets in my collection as I was a voracious collector in my younger days but nothing of this caliber. The Stevie Ray Vaughan box was a close second but the inclusion of new tracks, alternate takes along with the greatest hits really solidified this box as a treasure trove for me.  Its been years since I looked at the booklet itself but I remember I actually made my own cases and little inserts for the CDs as the box wouldn't fit in my racks and I didn't want the CDs to be shelved and forgotten somewhere.  All of Toms albums were ripped to MP3s of course but I have one classic iPod for a million years that hasn't been updated in eons - I think Echo was the last album to go on it, I would love to get the diagnostic info off of that player as I've been listening to it as my alarm in the morning for countless years and I could not guess how many times I've woken up to Casa Daga, Heart Breakers beach party and the rest.  Makes life a lot better waking up to Tom.  :D 

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"Depot Street" shows why Mudcrutch wasn't gonna last as a band. It's a nifty song but hardly worthy of being a single. It's like the record label was trying to kill them.

Also, I've said it before and I'll say it again "Come On Down to My House" is one of their most underrated songs they've ever done. It's no bullshit rock 'n' roll.

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On March 4, 2019 at 12:12 PM, mikemono said:

The set list from that night looks amazing, so if that was the show you were at -- or a night somewhere around that time -- then you definitely were in for a real treat!

It was pretty darn good especially in light of other tours to come. I was at the show two nights later in Columbus, Ohio and that show I figure was pretty similar to the previous one with a few songs swapped out. Setlist.fm is wrong for the show I went to as it ended with Alright For Now, though to be 100% sure next time I'm over I'll see if I can find my handwritten setlist.

There was a lot of jamming that night too, from IGTBK, Breakdown, Mike's surf saga, a bit at the end of DCAHNM which just started with Steven on the drums no fancy elaborate musical intro, Mary Jane's which was friggin' awesome and of course Driving Down to Georgia. Really good concert I was lucky to be there for it.

cheers

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23 hours ago, RedfordCowboy said:

Right on MJ2LD! I share in your love of the Playback box set. It holds a special spot in my TP collection, as it's a real treasure trove and testament to the Heartbreakers catalog up to that point.

Nice!

23 hours ago, RedfordCowboy said:

It demanded a lot from the listener (not a casual listen), and I was up for the task.

Yeah, the variety of music on there is fantastic.

23 hours ago, RedfordCowboy said:

I'm also with you, in the fact that discs 5 and 6 are my absolute favorite things on Playback. I can play those and never get tired. I think it's because they feel like they could be independent/official TP albums. They're that good. These "leftovers......as good (if not better) as songs found on the regular albums, don't you think?

Definitely! I view them as their own TPATH records, they are that good. If I mix in some of the stuff from the other discs, I think I have about a 22 song double (or triple) album of good new music to hear. On top of it, for whatever reason, I don't listen to these songs that much so when I do return to them it's very fresh.

I remember doing homework or just reading a book while these songs played in the background. 

23 hours ago, RedfordCowboy said:

 "I Can't Fight It" rocks. It's got that punchy and rowdy rock & roll attitude, underdog feeling, etc. This song in particular feels like it could be a connector between 70's Mudcrutch and the early Heartbreakers.

Yeah, I was really surprised when I heard that one again, I'd forgotten all about it; thinking more about Ways to Be Wicked or whatever but I Can't Fight It is one of their best and little known rockers. 

cheers

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17 hours ago, Big Blue Sky said:

"Worst Of Tom Petty" haha. 

Man, that would've been funny.

17 hours ago, Big Blue Sky said:

musicians didn't  neccesarily want to be banned from TV / radio, or create unneccesary roadblocks to getting the songs out there. Was that it?

Could be that makes sense. Could've been the challenge of it as well, as using fuck would be taking the easy way out. I like how he sings "..feel like a four-letter world." on Forgotten Man. 

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6 hours ago, Hoodoo Man said:

I've got to say, Playback was my favorite box set until An American Treasure came along.

I can't believe American Treasure topped it! Perhaps it's still the "new album" phase.

6 hours ago, Hoodoo Man said:

Its been years since I looked at the booklet itself but I remember I actually made my own cases and little inserts for the CDs as the box wouldn't fit in my racks and I didn't want the CDs to be shelved and forgotten somewhere. 

Neat man! That's pretty cool. I've misplaced a cd or two but fortunately I've got most of the songs backed up digitally and there's always youtube to refresh my memory on 'em. I might find 'em again too.

cheers

 

 

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2 hours ago, martin03345 said:

"Depot Street" shows why Mudcrutch wasn't gonna last as a band. It's a nifty song but hardly worthy of being a single. It's like the record label was trying to kill them.

Interesting. I disagree about the quality of the song as single potential. I remember being surprised at the Mudcrutch songs on here when I went back and looked at the booklet after my first or second listen years ago. Mudcrutch and covers.

2 hours ago, martin03345 said:

Also, I've said it before and I'll say it again "Come On Down to My House" is one of their most underrated songs they've ever done. It's no bullshit rock 'n' roll.

 I think Tom even mentions Nirvana in the booklet or an interview, alluding to the rise of the Seattle bands I think, (and now it occurs to me that perhaps Tom was unknowingly influenced by Nirvana, they've got Come as you are/Tpath have Come on Down, etc. but I doubt it was a conscious influence and it may not have been at all)

it's their most abrasive song sonically I think, as if they were taking a quick dip into the musical style of the time but still through their own style. It's an interesting combo. I like the song a lot, I'm grateful they played it a lot in '95 but I could see why they didn't continue on with a whole album of these, it seemed like Tom's interest was going in other directions, hence the mellowness of WF and so forth, no more Finding Outs but YDKHIFs and Swingin'; it seemed more in their interest.

That's another reason why HE was such a welcome surprise.

Back to Come On Down To My House, I enjoy Stan blasting away at his drums there at the end and that last cymbal strike! A very fun song and again, I was fortunate to have heard it that night in 1995.

cheers

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On 3/3/2019 at 8:36 PM, MaryJanes2ndLastDance said:

What do you think of Playback?

Why I think it's this amazing glimpse of what's under the surface.. the creative  processes at work, all these things that makes this band, but are sometimes left at the studio floor or on the shelf... the otherwise unseen or tucked away pieces of the puzzle, the stuff the deep space of the TPATH universe is made of.. the background "noise" not normally credited to even be there. (Just - why not all the b-sides? Or why not all the a-sides, for that matter.) I think it essential to the bone, of course! Despite it's inherent sample character that leaves you wanting more, that is.*

Why I think it's this amazing glimpse of grandiose record label thickness, the untrimmed fat of the sales gimmickry lard ward. Stupefyingly daft.**

In short, I think it's the best of two worlds: The world that dreams are made of, and the four letter world...  to paraphrase. A strange one with few equals anywhere, that is...

And. Any comparisons to AAT seems to miss the mark to me, no matter how one judge the latter.)

Btw. Peace in LA vs. Looking For Daddy, you say.. Perhaps it's just deja vu,  but didn't that come up before.. Very interesting either way. I like the idea.

------

* disc 4-6

** disc 1-3 (minus the one track contributing)

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8 hours ago, MaryJanes2ndLastDance said:

Interesting. I disagree about the quality of the song as single potential. I remember being surprised at the Mudcrutch songs on here when I went back and looked at the booklet after my first or second listen years ago. Mudcrutch and covers.

 I think Tom even mentions Nirvana in the booklet or an interview, alluding to the rise of the Seattle bands I think, (and now it occurs to me that perhaps Tom was unknowingly influenced by Nirvana, they've got Come as you are/Tpath have Come on Down, etc. but I doubt it was a conscious influence and it may not have been at all)

it's their most abrasive song sonically I think, as if they were taking a quick dip into the musical style of the time but still through their own style. It's an interesting combo. I like the song a lot, I'm grateful they played it a lot in '95 but I could see why they didn't continue on with a whole album of these, it seemed like Tom's interest was going in other directions, hence the mellowness of WF and so forth, no more Finding Outs but YDKHIFs and Swingin'; it seemed more in their interest.

That's another reason why HE was such a welcome surprise.

Back to Come On Down To My House, I enjoy Stan blasting away at his drums there at the end and that last cymbal strike! A very fun song and again, I was fortunate to have heard it that night in 1995.

cheers

I want you to think of the mid to early 70s pop/rock music scene and then look at "Depot Street" and then the stuff that was hitting the charts then. That song is a terrible choice for a single. "Lost in Your Eyes" is a better choice for a single and so is "I Can't Fight It".

Look, just because we here are die hard TPATH and Mudcrutch fans doesn't mean that what we think is great would've been the A & R choice for songs to hit the masses. As much as we all love "Keeping Me Alive" and think it should've been on an album, it doesn't mean it's a better choice as a single than "You Got Lucky". can't be the only one with that same thought process

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14 minutes ago, martin03345 said:

I want you to think of the mid to early 70s pop/rock music scene and then look at "Depot Street" and then the stuff that was hitting the charts then. That song is a terrible choice for a single.

"Lost in Your Eyes" is a better choice for a single and so is "I Can't Fight It".that what we think is great would've been the A & R choice for songs to hit the masses. As much as we all love "Keeping Me Alive" and think it should've been on an album, it doesn't mean it's a better choice as a single than "You Got Lucky". can't be the only one with that same thought process

I'm just going by what I make of the song, I think it's a neat fun song. There's a gift to being able to compact them much joy in three minutes and some change.

But I get what you're saying if you're seeing it from a hypothetical A & R's man point of view. As to what's on or was on the charts back then...gonna take a look right now and see.

**********

Well. My first thought is, I don't know most of those songs!

I checked out a bunch of different lists from 1974 and only recognized a few. I saw Benny and the jets on there. And the Joker, I think. While Depot Street sounds like neither  I think there's a big gap in sound/style between Benny and the Joker, as well. So maybe Depot Street could've worked. Sometimes a single works because it sounds like the current hits, but sometimes because it's different. 

But really, I don't have a clue on this man!

Is there an era of time you think Depot Street could've succeeded? Early 60s? It's very catchy, just writing about it now I can hear that joyful little chord progression, riff whatever.

What do other people think? Agree with martin03345 that they were nuts to try to make this into a lead single? I really don't know. It's not something I've considered before but it could make for an interesting discussion.

cheers

 

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Copy that Martin03345. 

To what extent did Denny Cordell & Shelter help TP, MC & BT grow as musicians? To what extent was Shelter losing its way & treating them as just another band? Sure, the retrospective discussion about those early days -in the documentary & books - paints Shelter in a positive light.  There are wonderful supportive aspects - like Cordell spending many evenings listening to music with TP & helping TP develop more of a critical listening ear across a wide range of music.  But same time, they basically jerked the musicians around,

Like giving them the pile of dollars upfront while getting TP to sign away his publishing rights. Like encouraging  Mudcrutch to play white-boy reggae while encouraging TP to work on his song-writing & unique sound.  I agree, who on earth chose Depot Street as representative of that band's sound for their debut single? Like dropping Mudcrutch, but almost immediately giving TP the opportunity to work on Leon Russell's album. Like sending TPATH on tour in '77 with a mate of Cordell's (Reggie) for their manager - who spent all their cash, leaving them stuck in Pittsburg, or wherever, without any money to pay for thei hotel rooms. But Reggie was always really encouraging & built their confidence!

Huh? Who does that? Oh yeah, record labels, that's who. 

I sometimes have a game where I try to think of all the things that happened to Mudcrutch or TPATH which they survived but which broke other bands. Like, The Eagles broke up allegedly because someone poured a beer on someone else's head.  Pah, that's amateur level.  That story of Ron Blair eating the hash is funny, but other musicians* were being denied visas etc because of drug issues - which put a potentially disastrous cramp on their touring.  

TPATH were smart, tough and amazing survivors, if nothing else. 

* Macca in Japan, for example.

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In my opinion, I Can't Fight It is much more representative of who the band evolved into than Depot Street. Nothing terrible about Depot Steet if you like white boy reggae* but it doesn't seem as authentically eccentric and unique as some of their other music from that time. 

 

* I'm teasing. 

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14 minutes ago, Big Blue Sky said:

* Macca in Japan, for example.

While I don't understand fans buying the same material over and over and over again, I really don't understand that nickname. McCartney. Macca? What the hell? It's awful sounding.

Mac? Sure? Mick? Why not? Cart, okay? Paul, I suppose. But Macca? It sounds like  a record label. Macca Records. Or something you spread on toast. 

"Please pass the Macca."

But now I can see thousands of shrieking fans discussing his hairsytle and wanting to be passed the Macca. 

Arrivederci!

 

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