Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
RedfordCowboy

Remembering Mindbender - 25 Years Later

Recommended Posts

In honor of the 25th Anniversary of the release of Mindbender, I thought it would be appropriate to repost this old interview from Rolling Stone.

 

——————————————————————————————————————


Tom Petty’s Long Strange Trip
By Cameron Crowe
From Rolling Stone Issue 664, September 1993.


So, how did this new record (Mindbender) come about?
We’ll, the plan wasn’t to make a record (laughs).

It was probably the quickest record we’ve ever done in the studio. Other than maybe our first two albums. But it was a different time and process back then, combined with the fact that we really didn’t know we were going. We just thought, we put a song down! And we were thrilled. Back then, records used to be recorded in a short period of time and released.  With Mindbender, it reminded me of that time. Rick just booked a handful of sessions with the Heartbreakers and we did the whole thing in a few weeks.

 

And yet, there are TWO Heartbreakers albums coming out this year.
That’s sort of a long story. Basically, our label approached us this year and told us they want to put out a Greatest Hits record. And that they wanted us to record and submit two new songs for it. I thought, that’s stupid. How can a new song be on the Greatest Hits album? When it’s not even a hit?

So, I didn’t want to play that game. I said to the guys, “Hey let’s just jam a bit. Plug in & play, get comfortable, and see what comes out. How we feel. There wasn’t a direction. Not trying to shape an album or anything. That was the start of it really. After a few days, we realized we had some really interesting songs coming together. Sort of off the cuff. When we played back this group of songs, which was us just jamming away in the studio, we realized we had what could be an interesting album. Unintentionally, of course.

 

So, it came together that fast?
Yep, 2 or 3 weeks. But, you see, we’d already been working in the studio for a year now, and our instincts are really sharp. So we were up to the challenge.

But yes, we have Mindbender coming out this month (releases September 21). And then following that will be the Greatest Hits album, a few months later.

 

And you’re also in the studio working on a different record with Rick Rubin, I understand?
Yes, we’ve been working on that one for a while now. It’s coming along great. I’m not sure if this will be a Heartbreakers record, or perhaps another solo one for me. Of course, almost all of the Heartbreakers are playing again on it as well (laughs). But we’ll see. We have a lot of songs already done for that. We just cut a good one the other day, called Don’t Fade On Me. It’s just me and Mike on that track. A real quiet song.

But Mindbender is a new batch of songs, that were recorded rather quickly, like I said. Some of them covers.


The mood and vibe of Mindbender feels drastically different from the last record, Into the Great Wide Open.
Sure. The Heartbreakers are a pretty durable band. They can play anything. And I mean I was throwing them a lot of curve balls. I’d say, let’s try this, and they would just go there. We were jamming out on many of them, just lost in the moment. We lost track of time in the studio!

With this new record, Benmont and (Mike) Campbell really shine. There’s a song on the record called “Melinda”, and I think it might be Ben’s finest hour. We just let him go on that song, wherever he wanted to take it. It’s one of my favorites on the record.

Their playing has never sounded better to me. Being around these guys, it makes me up my game. They are so good in the studio. We usually take months when recording, just trying to get it right. I’m sort of a perfectionist that way. But with Mindbender, this one came out different. It’s definitely our loosest playing yet, and maybe our most rock and roll. I’m hesitant to say it sounds like a jam band record, but….

I’m relieved that it came together so quickly. That never happens for us. We’re calling this our spontaneous record. Many of these songs were improvised. Some I was making up lyrics right on the spot, like on the song “You Get Me High.” We’ve actually played a few of these songs before in front of a live audience. During our last tour in Europe last year, we started getting adventurous. We would try out a song during sound check, and play it that night. One song was literally created on stage. (Note: the band also played the song “Come on Down to My House” in Europe last year, also found on this record.)

 

Speaking of, any touring plans on the horizon?
We do a have a small handful of shows coming up. One offs. Like this month, we’re doing a small club show, which is unusual for us. We’re helping our pal (Johnny Depp) open up his new club, which he’s calling the Viper Room. We’ll probably try out a few of these new songs. Johnny asked us, and couldn’t say no. I owe him for helping me out with one of my music videos (laughs).

We also have a rare homecoming show coming up, later this year in Gainesville. Basically to help promote the Greatest Hits album. I think that will probably be a special one for us, and we might pull out a few surprises. I don’t get back to Gainesville all that much these days.

 

But no upcoming Heartbreakers Tour?
No, we’re just living in the studio at the moment. I’m not ready to jump back on the road just yet. Oh, we might play Neil Young’s Bridge School Benefit show, which we usually do every year.

 

Still, with two new albums coming out, it’s a good time to be a Heartbreakers fan.
Yes. I guess we’re giving the fans some old music with the Greatest Hits compilation, and some new music with Mindbender. Too much ain’t enough, right? (laughs)

 

Sounds like things are good in the Heartbreakers camp. How are you guys getting along these days?
Oh, we’re getting along fine I suppose. There’s always little things, little disputes. But we’re like brothers, you know. We’ve known each other for a long time, and that means that we also know how to push each others buttons. Sometimes Stan might get to me. But Ben, usually being the diplomatic one, will calm us down. And none of us can ever get mad at Scott (referring to Scott Thurston, a touring member of the Heartbreakers). He’s just a cool kat.

But we’re still here. And I’m grateful to be doing it this long…in a way, I feel like I’m writing some of the best songs of my career. I’m in a pretty good place right now. I’m wondering if it ever will really slow down, this train that we’re on. The songs are really coming to me. Or maybe it’s just Rick pushing me really hard, I don’t know. (laughs, and lights another cigarette. He’s probably gone through half a pack so far during the course of our interview.)


 

I find it unusual that there’s three covers on this album. That’s not typical for a Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers album.
Isn’t that something? And we cut many more covers actually. We blasted out a couple Elvis Presley songs. We did an old one called “Wooden Heart”, but it didn’t fit in with the rest of the songs. It was a bit too mellow. We also tried out another Them song (Gloria), but we decided to go with “Mystic Eyes” instead. I love the sequence of this album. The songs flow together nicely.

The sound of this record is what it sounds like when we just get together to play in the Heartbreakers Clubhouse. We play what we all love. We’re students of this music, you know? We usually start off by playing a bunch of cover songs. If I’m honest, this is what I love playing the most. We could get lost for days playing these. Songs that I grew up listening to. We’ve been playing “13 Days” (by J.J. Cale) for years now.

 

J.J. Cale is an underrated and under appreciated musician.
Yes, and he’s one of our all time favorites. We listen to Cale all the time on our tour bus. We’re always digging through his old records and looking for gems that maybe the Heartbreakers could play. Our song “Magnolia”, one of our earlier records, always felt like a J.J. song to me, at least in spirit. I was probably channeling him. “13 Days” is one of my favorite songs. I just love the mood of that song. It changes the vibe in the show whenever we play it. It speaks to the weariness of the road.

We actually cut more J.J. Cale songs too, believe it or not, that didn’t make it on this record. We could only pick one! (laughs) We recorded “I’d Like to Love You Baby” and also “Traveling Light”. But the latter song turned out to be like 11 minutes long or something like that. And many of these songs are already long and bluesy on this album. It would turn into a really long listening experience, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. But the record label starts to get nervous when you show up with too many long songs on an album. What is this, Freebird? (laughs).

(Petty seems to really be stuck on Cale at the moment)

He’s someone I’d like to play with. Both me and Michael, it would be fun to just sit in on one of his sets. And learn from the master, you know? Maybe one of these days we’ll get a chance to do that. It would be fun to tour with him actually. Maybe to have him open for the Heartbreakers on a joint tour would be an honor for us. I mean, look at Clapton. He’s been a champion of J.J. Cale for years. He knows. And we’ve been playing tribute to him in our live sets.

I joke around with the guys that maybe one day we’ll just but out an album of Blues cover songs. You know, Diddley, Muddy Waters, that type of thing. I wouldn’t put it past us.

We are influenced by so many artists, the list is endless by now.

 

Let’s talk about a few of the songs on the album. Starting with Something in the Air.
When we first came together to record, we really didn’t have any songs ready. So we we were just trying whatever came to mind. Like the Zombies or something. But this particular one was an old obscure 60’s song by Thunderclap Newman, that we all liked. I don’t know who said we should try it, maybe it was Rick Rubin. But it came together nicely, and sort of starts the album out. Knd of an optimistic feeling.

 

Tell me about the song Mary Jane’s Last Dance. That song is killer.
I actually had this song floating around for a while, but it was incomplete. I think I started writing it around ’88 or something, but I didn’t have a chorus. But me and Mike didn’t want to give up on that riff. We knew we had something there. So, we brought it back out for these sessions, and the chorus finally came together after we started practicing it a few times. The original working title for the song was “Indiana Girl.”

 

I understand this is going to the first single off the record?
That’s what I’m told. And I think it’s a good choice. We actually just shot the music video. The concept of this one is a trip. I think it might freak a few people out, or at least bewilder them… (hesitant to say more.)

 

How so? It can’t be any more wild than your video for “Don’t Come Around Here No More” can it?
But without giving too much away, I will say that it features a famous Hollywood actress. And that’s all I’m gonna say.

 

 

TPHB MINDBENDER.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aw, come on guys, use your imagination here!! (not your illusion....)

Do you know how much time I spent writing that pretend interview imagining how Tom would answer pretend questions to his old pal Cameron Crowe on an imaginary Heartbeakers release??? (tell me that doesn't sound like Tom)

And coming up with an accompanying album cover too!? :)

But seriously, this whole exercise was steeped in curiously from a fascinating time period (for me) with the Heartbeakers....the summer of 1993. Between recording Wildflowers and right before Greatest Hits.

It was the time of the last official recording sessions with Stan, when they had to cut a few new songs (or produce a Greatest Hit, if you will), for the upcoming Greatest Hits album! The sessions that produced Mary Jane's Last Dance!

Is anybody else here curious as to what other songs or material they might've recorded during those sessions?? Am I missing any potential songs on my imaginary track list? What else would they have tried out? Was Driving Down to Georgia like Surrender, where they couldn't nail a take that they liked? Is there a studio version of Lost Without You? A demo of 13 Days?

What if someday these sessions are revisited for a potential release?

I know we've talked about it before on another thread, the Lost Heartbeakers Album. I though a few of you might enjoy or partake in the imaginary brilliance of Mindbender.

What if those sessions produced enough songs to create an interesting HB album which captured where they were at the time?

What say ye, MJ2LD?

Any thoughts, Marion or Chimera?

Oh....Shelter?

Where you at, TwoGunslingers?

I'm calling on you, Nurktwin....

Bueller, anybody....Bueller?

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, RedfordCowboy said:

Do you know how much time I spent writing that pretend interview imagining how Tom would answer pretend questions to his old pal Cameron Crowe on an imaginary Heartbeakers release??? (tell me that doesn't sound like Tom)

Well, I've read a couple hundred interviews, and you fooled me enough to go and try to look it up. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, RedfordCowboy said:

Aw, come on guys, use your imagination here!! (not your illusion....)

Do you know how much time I spent writing that pretend interview imagining how Tom would answer pretend questions to his old pal Cameron Crowe on an imaginary Heartbeakers release??? (tell me that doesn't sound like Tom)

And coming up with an accompanying album cover too!? :)

You did a really good job, totally!  As someone who enjoys forays into "What if...?" territory both creatively and historically, it was artfully done in the sense that it definitely had that authentic vibe and voice to it.  I think it would have been wonderful to have an album release from those "last gasp" sessions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, Robert.. I may call you Robert? I am obviously very impressed by the, shall we say channel you tapped into here. For persona in the interview, for art and to some extent for tracklist. Great job in the fan fiction vein, or rather music journalism fiction. That far you handle the wheel with more skill and swagger than most rock writers this side of Lester Bangs. It's the seed of a fan fiction Don Delillo kinda work. 

Ok. Well.

As for your album. I can't answer all your questions, surely. Or perhaps I can. But not with any total accuracy and not without checking my "notes". I would offer the initiated guess, that you're not totally off the map. Although, I'd suggest that the derailed 92-93 sessions that was aimed at a ITGWO follow-up did just produce very little in term of original tunes. Georgia, sure. Lost, sure. Neither quite nailed. You Get Me High. Yeah..uh.. fun song, in that great but wise-comic type vein they sometimes blew off steam with, but never exactly built there albums around, or even allowed on said album (see Heartbreakers Beach Party, Girl on LSD... Moon Pie.. and so on, for reference).

So, between the old Indiana Girl and all the rest (sic!) .. Some very promising demos by 1993, I'm sure, perhaps a few decent takes (who knows),  but as far as productive record sessions go, I suppose things came to a halt for a reason there.

Then for the Gr Hits Session. Several known songs. Can't recall the exact number (I'm on a bus right now - true story) but almost all of that was covers, in part done for fun, in part to fill the disc with something "new" ( in order to lure in the old fans to buy the old songs yet again). Also covers in that situation is a safe method compared to adding a new original to an album thusly titled GH, I speculate. So, mostly covers. Blue Moon of Kentucky? Kinda a list of stuff meant to do what Something In The Air did.

Then they struck gold with Mary Jane. Fluke? Hardly. But great timing  that. I'd say its their greatest timing ever! Masterpiece, obviously a Greatest Hit even before anyone heard it, so of all the covers cut, only one survived to release. (Howie' s only shared lead and an absolute killer of a song and version, SITA is one of their most underrated recordings in my view.)

Anyway, as sessions from which to cull stuff to a studio album proper, preferably stuffed with TP originals at that, I wouldn't find the Gr Hits sessions too suitable. Again, Mary Jane would've been the obvious pick, but, also again, that song is really older, and then it could have... Yeah.. Well..  

As fantasies go, I love yours. But unless we can imagine sessions that never happened, that took perfect care of all the best original loose ends that TP had in his work book by 1993 (Some of which we don't know of, and others I think you may have omitted), I think the Mindbender will be just that, a bending of the mind; I don't think there is enough recorded, at least not anywhere nearly finished recordings or outtakes (even if you date back to 1990-91 sessions leftovers, to arrange an album out of it.) On the other hand, if you go by titles and songs they could've - theoretically - have finished in such imaginable sessions, there's no need to bring covers into the equation at all. 

So, basically, it's a fun scenario you created. Thanks! Artwork is great too! But this album that never was could and would have been somewhat better if it would've been. Even, no matter original material preference, strength or weakness, the fact that you put so much covers on there is what, more than any other reality checks that can be done, breaks the spell for me. Tom would never have done that. It's not his move. And if he would've done it, at that time, chanses are that the press and fans would have started to speculate if he was done.. at the very least it would've opened the Pandora's box on the rest of their career. Also, it could've meant Stan staying.

That's my thoughts after visiting your parallel universe. I feel bent.

 

PS. Mystic Eyes is an abomination, if you ask me. As is Gloria. The very thought of them including any of the two on any if there studio albums give me the heebiejeebies. And I say that as a big Them fan, of course. TP just picked Them's (Their's?) worst moments to obsess over. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ha, great work! I love the historically accurate attention to detail in the interview, and the answers totally do sound like TP.

I am also fascinated by this period of the band, and of course I can't resist constructing "lost" albums. For the record, this would be my potential track list for a Heartbreakers album culled from this era:

1. Mary Jane's Last Dance
2. Waiting For Tonight
3. Travelin'
4. You Come Through
5. Lonesome Dave
6. God's Gift to Man
7. Driving Down to Georgia
8. Lost Without You
9. You Get Me High
10. Come On Down to My House

Some of those tracks date back to previous sessions (I drew the line at 1988, since anything recorded before that would be in the Let Me Up universe), but they all had no home as of 1993 and all fit the off-the-cuff Heartbreakers nature of this potential project. (Some of the LMU outtakes would surely fit the vibe here too, but I didn't want to go back that far.)

Judging by Benmont's recent comments about "Lonesome Dave," in which he indicated the "barnburner" track was more of a Heartbreakers track than a potential Wildflowers cut, I added that on here, as it is will likely suite the vibe. (Can't wait to hear it in a few weeks!)

You could also add any number of covers here too — "Baby Let's Play House," "Wooden Heart," "Blue Moon of Kentucky," "Something in the Air," plus whatever else they recorded for fun that we don't know about, but TP never put anything but originals on studio releases (minus the Mudcrutch and She's the One aberrations), so I did not.

Fun project to think about!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, High Grass Dog said:

but TP never put anything but originals on studio releases (minus the Mudcrutch and She's the One aberrations), so I did not.

 

I feel a whole lot better after reading that. :)

I'm not a big fan of Asshole or Change the locks. But I have to admit that Change the locks is quite interesting. This kind of lyric sounds strange in his voice. A male singing this kind of lyric is, at least, interesting. It's difficult to think about a man changing the lock or the number of his phone. I wonder if he had some purpose when he decided to record this song.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well at first TP was trying to do the traditional thing of curating material for a soundtrack, so those were songs he wanted to use, I believe  But he always believed that a good song is a good song, so I can see him wanting to cover them just from that perspective.  

I think the literal parts of the song are really supposed to be considered on a metaphorical level, so I'm imagining he could relate to it just on the level of dealing with the aftermath of a toxic relationship (as this is something he had experience with).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, well done!  It's the the whole thing is the most hilarious (& clever & subtle) leg-pull I have seen in quite some time.  I have been chuckling about it all week.   Mentioned it to some buddies outside Petty universe who also fell about laughing at the idea.  So you are awarded 5-stars or (better) 5-thumbs-ups:

 👍🏼👍🏼👍🏼👍🏼👍🏼

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, chimera said:

I think the literal parts of the song are really supposed to be considered on a metaphorical level, so I'm imagining he could relate to it just on the level of dealing with the aftermath of a toxic relationship (as this is something he had experience with).

For me the best verse of that song, the best metaphor if you want, is that one about to change the tracks underneath the train. This verse is more syimbolic and less graphic than the other ones. The other verses suggested in a more graphic way the portrait of someone who has been been harassed. The verse about to change the tracks is the strongest verse. And I still have the feeling that this kind of verse is written by a woman who is scaping of a toxic relationship, as you said, or even something worse as I think. This is why I think this song is interesting in Tom's voice. Maybe I'm a little bit influenced because I know that this song was written by Lucinda. I don't know. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BTW. For those of you interested and who wasn't around in 2015, there are some speculations about the main 92-93 sessions, the aborted album as well as the Gr Hits sessions, in this thread: 

 

 

Water under the bridges and I think perhaps some additional facts has surfaced since. I will have to try to track down whatever session journals I've been keeping and get back here if I find anything useful, to put this Mindbender into proper context, if anyone is interested. The bending is good in its own right, as it were! 🧘‍♂️ 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the Mindbender needs the finished take of God's gift to man. They say in the playback booklet that the song fell apart... Well, who knows. Are there any other takes of this song? My guess is that something similar to the "Rebels" story happened (I'm not equating both songs!) Maybe they tried to do something with God's gift to man but they lose  the spontaneity and the power on their way to the good take. Or not. Who knows. Mindbender needs a finished take of God's gift to man!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mr Timba - Yes, God's Gift to Man would be a perfect addition to Mindbender for sure. It fits in with the rowdy vibe of Come on Down to My House, I think.

Shelter - Yes, thanks for re-posting that thread from 2015. It definitely is connected to this! (Mindbender, that is, ha ha). If you haven't read it yet, it's a good discussion on the 92-93 recording sessions, trying to piece the potential songs together.

I like how you've designated the "Aborted HB Sessions" (1992) and the "Greatest Hit's Filler Session" (1993)

Timeline:

I've read that Tom took 2 years to do Wildflowers. Which would be late 1992 - late 1994. Released Nov. 1994

Touring the Great Wide Open (1991-1992) ended on April 2, 1992 in Sweden.

So that give you a window for the aborted HB sessions (April 1992 - late 1992).

Greatest Hits filler session: summer 1993

Mary Jane's Last Dance was recorded on July 22, 1993. That's why I'm putting Mindbender in the summer of 1993.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Jane's_Last_Dance

The 2015 thread proposes that there were 14 songs recorded during this time. We know of 6, 8 still missing. Thus the Mindbender hypothetical scenario.

--------

Blue Moon of Kentucky sounds like a close cousin of Baby, Let's Play House.

Which brings me to "Somewhere Under Heaven". This one is a weird one. Recorded in 1992, It just doesn't sound like a Wildflowers track at all. It sounds closer to ITGWO. It would make sense to me that this is from the aborted HB sessions, no? I mean, if you put this anywhere on Wildflowers, to my ears, it would feel totally out of place with the rest of the songs. Cool song, but not a Wildflowers vibe.

Can't wait to hear Lonesome Dave. Who know that Tom would write a song about a dude in Foghat!? Whaaaaaat....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, RedfordCowboy said:

 

Which brings me to "Somewhere Under Heaven". This one is a weird one. Recorded in 1992, It just doesn't sound like a Wildflowers track at all. It sounds closer to ITGWO. It would make sense to me that this is from the aborted HB sessions, no? I mean, if you put this anywhere on Wildflowers, to my ears, it would feel totally out of place with the rest of the songs. Cool song, but not a Wildflowers vibe.

Can't wait to hear Lonesome Dave. Who know that Tom would write a song about a dude in Foghat!? Whaaaaaat....

But that song was touted as part of the Wildflowers All the Rest presale package. I would really hope its related to the Wildflowers session and not a latter one.  

 

Do we know when Make that connection and Down the Line were recorded?

Also is there a wiki page for Tom on the Petty Archives or somewhere with song origin info? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On September 12, 2018 at 2:22 PM, RedfordCowboy said:

What say ye, MJ2LD?

It's the strangest thing I can't seem to find my copy of Mindbender. Which is a shame since it has a neat cover.

I've looked all over too. Oh well, I'm sure it'll turn up these things usually do. I had the sudden hankering to give it a listen, it's an interesting record, can you believe they were nearly going to ditch/fire/have Stan quit before they released this record? Crazy, I know! 

 
But enough thinking about silly what might have been and let's look at this record.
 
Something In The Air is a fine cover, I quite like it, if I'd never known it was a cover I'd happily believe it to be a TPATH original. 
 
I'm quite surprised at Tom opening a record with an unoriginal tune though.
 
Interesting that track #2 is the powerhouse, well, if I didn't know better I'd think it would've fit just fine on Greatest Hits, it's that powerful and popular a tune. In terms of flow having it follow the poppy Something is a neat and intense contrast.
 
13 Days is a cover song I do like but again, quite odd, third track and two covers already?!
 
lost without You---Wow, listen to all that feedback and dissonance, that alone makes the song stand out, lyrically it's like the end of the live version of Breakdown, that painful emotion distilled into its own song. I like it and the transition from the crazy feedback ending, power chords and pain leading into the the neat clean riff of the next tune.
 
Two Men Talking---I just realized Side A ends with a Mike spotlight, and Side B with Benmont. Since I love both songs live it's good to see that they also stand up on record, this song just barely clears three minutes, a full minute given over to Mike's soloing but it's worth it!
 
 
You Get Me High---I like this song.
 
Come On Down----the Nirvana influenced song? I like it though I think it's maybe too much back to back with Georgia.
 
Georgia---One of my favorites and I keep repeating it but nice to see how the band was able to drop this into 2:59 seconds without losing anything and who doesn't like that double-time outro that fades out the way it does, Mike wailing away...!
 
Mystic---I have to say, not only is a third cover too many, this song just isn't good. Live the only good part was the extended middle but since it was more of the same, the band bringin' it down, no, I can't say this is good at all. With the benefit of hindsight I think Saving Grace, the fast slide guitar version from the '08 tour would've worked just fine here.
 
Melinda---I like how short this song is on record, hard to imagine they'd distill a live powerhouse for Benmont down to three minutes but they did, quick intro, nice soloing, the little classical figure out of the solo and then that graceful fade out....I'm glad they gave the last word so to speak to Benmont for this neat record.
 
I like the album despite the number of covers, the way it took the energy of ITGWO and made it into something else...why...it almost feels unreal at times, as if it were just the fever dream of some fan...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎9‎/‎12‎/‎2018 at 8:22 PM, RedfordCowboy said:

Aw, come on guys, use your imagination here!! (not your illusion....)

Do you know how much time I spent writing that pretend interview imagining how Tom would answer pretend questions to his old pal Cameron Crowe on an imaginary Heartbeakers release??? (tell me that doesn't sound like Tom)

And coming up with an accompanying album cover too!? :)

But seriously, this whole exercise was steeped in curiously from a fascinating time period (for me) with the Heartbeakers....the summer of 1993. Between recording Wildflowers and right before Greatest Hits.

It was the time of the last official recording sessions with Stan, when they had to cut a few new songs (or produce a Greatest Hit, if you will), for the upcoming Greatest Hits album! The sessions that produced Mary Jane's Last Dance!

Is anybody else here curious as to what other songs or material they might've recorded during those sessions?? Am I missing any potential songs on my imaginary track list? What else would they have tried out? Was Driving Down to Georgia like Surrender, where they couldn't nail a take that they liked? Is there a studio version of Lost Without You? A demo of 13 Days?

What if someday these sessions are revisited for a potential release?

I know we've talked about it before on another thread, the Lost Heartbeakers Album. I though a few of you might enjoy or partake in the imaginary brilliance of Mindbender.

What if those sessions produced enough songs to create an interesting HB album which captured where they were at the time?

What say ye, MJ2LD?

Any thoughts, Marion or Chimera?

Oh....Shelter?

Where you at, TwoGunslingers?

I'm calling on you, Nurktwin....

Bueller, anybody....Bueller?

 

 

 

Took me some time to wrap my head around this thread... (note the rhyme!)

Now I know what this is abou; I only knew fan fictions in different contexts.

Great job, actually, you almost had me fooled the first time around! :lol: I really came close to believing there could have been an unreleased album that once was almost finished.

 

1993 definitely seems to have been a transitional period for Tom; he tried to figure out where to go next. I find it fascinating that he chose a mellower path in the end, recording and releasing Wildflowers, instead of his version of grunge (which seems to have been a serious option for a while there), or Mindbender, as we should henceforth call it!

Have to think more about that topic.

I feel honored to be mentioned in the list of names above, by the way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×