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Hoodoo Man

Essential listening outside of Heartbreakers albums?

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UM ... you're saying you're not familiar with what which message is describing? Oh lord my grammar is melting down:)

PS I watched Annie & Aretha yesterday - first time in ages & it is so good!!  Except for Dave Stewart - what's he doing in a feminist anthem?  I mean maybe he was feminist (I dunno) but he seems essentially unnecessary in this video.  Ooo though, like he'll care what I think...  But still - any one guess why's he dancing around in it? 😎

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just in case it's my offhand remark that's causing confusion

19 hours ago, chimera said:

:lol:

Hey so, I don't think I'm familiar with what you're describing...help a fangirl out, please?

here's a brief summary of the short life of the Dwight Twilley Band which I copied from Wiki (source of all information ;)) & cut to the bones.  It's a bit snakes & ladders, up & down.  I swear I'm dizzy from my additional smiley & frowning faces ... but I hope this shows their stumbling along their early path.  Meanwhile Mudcrutch were doing their thing & then Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers emerged :).  

  • Dwight Twilley and Phil Seymour met in Tulsa in 1967 at a theater where they had gone to see The Beatles' A Hard Day's Night, and soon began writing songs and recording together /  band called Oister.
  • Twilley wrote all the songs and played guitar and piano.  Seymour played drums and bass. Both sang leads and harmonies. Later,  Bill Pitcock IV played lead guitar.
  • Oister (Twilley and Seymour) signed with Shelter Records in 1974 :).   (Just a few months after Mudcrutch.)
  • Cordell promptly changed the group's name from Oister to the Dwight Twilley Band, which set the seeds for future problems arising from Seymour's anonymity in the partnership. :(
  • 1975 Debut single "I'm on Fire" -  photos used on the single's picture sleeve were low quality from a photo booth. relatively little promotion :(  but #16 on the charts :)
  • Recorded (in England) tracks for The B Album.:)
  • Recorded an album at Leon Russell's home studio.  A studio engineer Roger Linn provided lead guitars and bass on some tracks.:)
  • Appearance on American Bandstand, playing its second single "Shark (in the Dark)" :) The success of the film Jaws at same time caused Cordell and Shelter to reject the single:( to keep them from looking like a cash-in novelty act.
  • Next - single "You Were So Warm" released :)  BUT Shelter Records collapsed in the midst of a lawsuit between Russell and Cordell. :(
  • Shelter switched from MCA Records to ABC Records for distribution.  The Sincerely album from Leon Russell's studio = unreleased for 10 months.  The B Album (from England) was unreleased.:(
  • 1976 1st album Sincerely released - peaked at #138. :(  (Meanwhile here comes TP & the Heartbreakers creating their debut album.  Phil Seymour sang backing vocals on Breakdown and American Girl.:))
  • In 1977, the Dwight Twilley Band (& TP on bass as a favor) performed on TV:) but it was a  Saturday morning kids show Wacko!:(
  •  
  • ABC grabbed Petty and J. J. Cale.  Twilley with Shelter/Arista label.
  • 1977 2nd album Twilley Don't Mind = "commercial disappointment"  :( (Meanwhile TPATH touring like crazy all through 1977)
  • Seymour left the band the following year.

 

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8 hours ago, Big Blue Sky said:

But still - any one guess why's he dancing around in it? 😎

I'm assuming because it's an Eurythmics song (i.e. Annie and Dave are the band).

43 minutes ago, Big Blue Sky said:

just in case it's my offhand remark that's causing confusion

No it wasn't that, dear. :)  My response was to Shelter.

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1 hour ago, chimera said:

No it wasn't that, dear. :)  My response was to Shelter.

Oh, I see. Thanks for asking, then. What I meant was merely that the people who hasn't already done so, may be in for a treat checking out the stuff "our boys" contributed to various compilations, tributes and so on.. Personal favourites are the No Nukes album (well, call that anti tribute... although Cry To Me is on Playback, so not literally a rarity that way), the Good Rocking Tonight album (tribute to Sun records), Goin' Home album (tribute to Fats Domino) and so on.. there is more.. and I leave for you the utter joy to discover what songs they do! 

And. Not that it's a tribute, but still it kinda is... full of guests.. just search your nearest online tube for "Carl Perkins Go Cat Go full album" and find TPATH in several places, among which are some sadly neglected, overlooked and all out forgotten vocals by Tom. Mean stuff, if you ask me. Didn't mean to make so much of this, but since you asked... Enjoy!

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alsolove love love the way he would introduce Cry To Me as being a song request by his parents & would the audience possibly mind?  He does this in Houston and also Hammersmith (as we can hear in bootlegs & recorded audio).  Is a bit cheeky to repeat very similar intro to a song - but hey in those days who would be in both Houston AND Hammersmith except the band, right?  Also so sweet to be giving a shout-out to his mom :wub:

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I don't know if Roger McGuinn's "Back from Rio" is an essential listening (for me it is) But this album should be mentioned on this thread.

Apart from King of the Hill, "the trees are all gone" it's Roger and Heartbreakers if I remember well. Stan plays drums in the whole album and Mike and Ben play in several songs.

(Awaiting for the early demo of King of the Hill)

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13 hours ago, Mr Timba said:

I don't know if Roger McGuinn's "Back from Rio" is an essential listening (for me it is) But this album should be mentioned on this thread.

Apart from King of the Hill, "the trees are all gone" it's Roger and Heartbreakers if I remember well. Stan plays drums in the whole album and Mike and Ben play in several songs.

(Awaiting for the early demo of King of the Hill)

thats a good one that I have been meaning to pick up for years.

Also for anyone that might be considering the Roy Orbison Mystery girl album its gone into heavy rotation for me as of late.  Can hear more of a Jeff Lyne influence to my mind on it but its a beautiful album. :) 

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Have you heard Roy's "King of Hearts" album?

Ben also worked on this album. He overdubbed the keys in a couple of songs Roy left unfinished, "We'll take the night" and "After the love has gone". Apart from his work on the keys he overdubbed the chorus together with Barbara Orbison, Don Was and some other guys in "After the love has gone".

The early demo of "Careless Heart" included in this album is a good example for appreciating how a song becomes great when the Heartbreakers play on it. 

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I think Bob Dylan's "Together Through Life" should be mentioned in this thread. Mike plays guitar in all the tracks. For those who have not listened this album, Mike not plays with his trademark sound. An underestimaded album by many people, not a masterpiece, but in my humble opinion is a really consistent album. And Mike is there.

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Now a curiosity :)

I'm sure all of you have heard Tom singing that song/joke called "Titanic" in allusion to the boring Celine Dion's "My Heart will go on" (It was a torture that song! It was everywhere, imposible to scape of that song!). Well, that song was written by Will Jennings and another guy. I'm sure that the "Mistery girl" lovers are aware that "In the real world" (a beatiful song in my opinion, in which you can hear Tom sing uhhh, uhhh...) is also written by Will Jennings. 

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1 hour ago, Mr Timba said:

I think Bob Dylan's "Together Through Life" should be mentioned in this thread. Mike plays guitar in all the tracks. For those who have not listened this album, Mike not plays with his trademark sound. An underestimaded album by many people, not a masterpiece, but in my humble opinion is a really consistent album. And Mike is there.

Good points. Certainly a key album. However much I love most things Dylan, I do think that album has some production/mix problems. Some that even concern Mike, at that. There´re certainly some great stuff done by MC on there, some riffs and sounds perhaps not totally strange to Mojo listeners, even. I must admit that I neither know the details of the TTL recording sessions, nor find all of the material on the album to be among Bob´s sharpest, but I do have a hunch that the album wasn´t his most focused work, so to speak (wasn´t it originally meant to be a soundtrack, btw?) and that even with Bob´s sometimes "random" approach to making album, this one is a bit.. shall we say.. forced.. or sudden. Plenty of great playing on there, two or three really classic songs, but several of the tracks seems a bit "glued together" to me. It really seems like a few of the instruments have been over dubbed and put on as an afterthought. To me some of the MC work is part of that problem to me. It sounds a bit as if a riff or guitar piece have been cut - instead of longer dynamic, more soulful segmenst of typical MC taste and touch, not to mention any live playing, together with the band - then looped in small cuts over the basic tracks. At least on one or two occasions these little "riffs" are also put up too high in the sound mix? Is it just me hearing this? Thinking it a bit of a shame to treat some fine MC playing that way? The end result is a somewhat uneven album that in spots sounds like brainwash to me - Like "Di-di-di-di-di-deee-deee" x 48, right in your face. 

 

1 hour ago, Mr Timba said:

"In the real world" (a beatiful song in my opinion, in which you can hear Tom sing uhhh, uhhh...) is also written by Will Jennings. 

Good call!

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2 hours ago, Shelter said:

Good points. Certainly a key album. However much I love most things Dylan, I do think that album has some production/mix problems. Some that even concern Mike, at that. There´re certainly some great stuff done by MC on there, some riffs and sounds perhaps not totally strange to Mojo listeners, even. I must admit that I neither know the details of the TTL recording sessions, nor find all of the material on the album to be among Bob´s sharpest, but I do have a hunch that the album wasn´t his most focused work, so to speak (wasn´t it originally meant to be a soundtrack, btw?) and that even with Bob´s sometimes "random" approach to making album, this one is a bit.. shall we say.. forced.. or sudden. Plenty of great playing on there, two or three really classic songs, but several of the tracks seems a bit "glued together" to me. It really seems like a few of the instruments have been over dubbed and put on as an afterthought. To me some of the MC work is part of that problem to me. It sounds a bit as if a riff or guitar piece have been cut - instead of longer dynamic, more soulful segmenst of typical MC taste and touch, not to mention any live playing, together with the band - then looped in small cuts over the basic tracks. At least on one or two occasions these little "riffs" are also put up too high in the sound mix? Is it just me hearing this? Thinking it a bit of a shame to treat some fine MC playing that way? The end result is a somewhat uneven album that in spots sounds like brainwash to me - Like "Di-di-di-di-di-deee-deee" x 48, right in your face. 

 

I don't have a very sharp ears to appreciate the problems in the mix, this kind of things usually go unnoticed through my clumsy ears! I think the main problem of TTL is the lack of any great or captivating song. I enjoyed a lot TTL when it came out because I was able to enjoy the album from the beginning to the end. I can't say the same of the previous album, Modern Times has a lot of boring moments (at least for me). I have to tie my hands for not to push the skip button over and over. But Modern times has two great and captivating songs for my taste; "Ain't talkin" and "Workingman's blues". Which track of TTL is the gem of the album? Well, I don't know. There isn't any gem in TTL. Seen under some perspective, I would say that the gem of TTL is Forgetful Heart, the song, not the recording of the song. FH have grown onstage, Dylan did amazing performances of this song, in another mood, with another feel and with another arrangements. It was one of the better numbers in Dylan's show until a few years ago, but obviously this thing has nothing to do with Mike!

And talking about mixing problems, Dylan, and the Heartbreakers... I go with "Cross the Green Mountain". Ben plays the keys in this Dylan song. In this song there is a great botch in the mix. Bob did some vocal overdubs, and in one them you can still hear the echo of the original verse. Oooops.

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I can't believe the Blue Stingrays remain unsaid in this thread.

Just curious. I was surprised by the title "Moon over Catalina". The music is such a variation of "Blue Moon", at least in my ears, but why Moon over Catalina? In spanish language people sometimes calls the sun "Lorenzo" and the moon "Catalina". There is an old poem for children about the wedding of the sun and the moon (Lorenzo and Catalina). I have never expected a reference to that in a surf song! Or it is another thing?

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Well for me, surf music isn't necessarily appealing to everyone.  I love that album, but I have to be in the proper mood for it.

Catalina refers to Catalina Island, off the coast of California.  It's a lovely place, I've been there often over the years.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Catalina_Island_(California)

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10 hours ago, Mr Timba said:

I can't believe the Blue Stingrays remain unsaid in this thread.

Just curious. I was surprised by the title "Moon over Catalina". The music is such a variation of "Blue Moon", at least in my ears, but why Moon over Catalina? In spanish language people sometimes calls the sun "Lorenzo" and the moon "Catalina". There is an old poem for children about the wedding of the sun and the moon (Lorenzo and Catalina). I have never expected a reference to that in a surf song! Or it is another thing?

where can i get this?

is it by Mike?

PS I'm a Bob Dylan fan too!  (1965-1970)

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On 8/28/2018 at 8:55 PM, Big Blue Sky said:

Suggest ...this Roy Orbison album because of TP's role in studio & you can hear his voice in harmonies

Image result for roy orbison mystery girl album

Suggest this track by Joni Mitchell 1986 It has TP's vocal which sings some verses solo & also harmonizes with Joni's across most of the rest of the track.  The other voice is Billy Idol's.  Also because this clip is so cheerful & I think we can always have more good vibes (& kittens) in this life 

 

 

if you get lucky with this & there are any spares will let me know?  :)

Roy Orbison - Mystery girl it's a great album

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The Orbison-Stan "connection" :)

We know Stan was not invited to eat any piece of cake in the "Mistery Girl" party. But years after he put his grain of sand in "I should have been true". In my humble opinion a beautiful song in a classic "orbisonesque" style. Raul Malo is the one who did the trick, but Stan had something to do for sure. 

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