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Wildflowers (all the rest) tracks?

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6 hours ago, RedfordCowboy said:

1. Option 1: All the Rest - Standalone album with the "new" 11-12 tracks only. $9.99

2. Option 2: The above + the originally envisioned WF Double LP. $34.99

3. Option 3: Deluxe: The above + One disc of WF home demos (that Ryan U recently stumbled upon) $44.99

4. Option 4: Ultra Deluxe Box Set: The above + 1995 Dogs With Wings live show recording + Hardcover book with essays and never-before-seen photos. All wrapped in an organic cloth box that looks like the texture of the WF cover. With an embroidered flower on the cover. $149.99

Four new versions seems a bit excessive.  And to me it goes against TP's view of allowing "the little guy" to not get nickel-and-dimed (or "dollared" as in $8.98 to $9.98).  I think it was wrong to have 2 and 4 CD versions of "American Treasure", and wrong also not to eventually sell "Live Anthology" as a 5 CD (only) set.  

Also, some people consider the original "Wildflowers" album to be a masterpiece as is, so I assume they like the exact tracking order of songs as is.  So for them, a version has to stand "as is" in the same sequence, perhaps with bonus tracks tacked on but otherwise untouched. 

Personally I would like to see the "new" remixed (and perhaps overdubbed by MC, BT, RB, SF, ST, in some cases) songs integrated into the album as a double CD, with a new running sequence (i.e. "as envisioned").  Rather than the original CD + the outtakes (tacked on).   But that's just from an artistic point of view.  From a business point of view, original CD + "the rest" (tacked on as a second CD) makes the most sense.  However, for the people who think the original album is a masterpiece that should remain untouched, there would still be the original CD (obtainable as a used album if nothing else, or could be "burned" to CDR in the original order).  Either way, a 2 CD version.   

So I'd say there should be 2 versions, a 2 CD version (maybe $14.95), plus a super-deluxe boxed set as described in option 4 above.  Though the boxed set would ideally include the pro-shot Chicago 1995 DVD, presumably in higher quality than has been bootlegged (not that the bootlegs are bad quality, but I assume that TPATH has the original pro-shot tapes to work with).   

 

 

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Good find, Tomfest!!!

To save anyone else having to scroll past 100 agonising ads... New info is in first 2 paragraphs only. Rest of article is old news / background.

According to legal documents, obtained by The Blast, Tom Petty's widow Dana York Petty and his daughters Adria and Annakim Petty have settled their issues and will drop lawsuits against each other.

A new filing in the case states, "The parties to the foregoing matters have entered into a settlement."

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I still want to hear what Tom wanted us to have years ago...  Its his legacy and should have been the first posthumous release. Would have saved the estate a lot of bickering IMHO. Given them proper time to release the two sets.

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^ pretty much, yeah.

now maybe all the old albums can finally be reissued yet again, in honor and praise of Tom. also, maybe lots of tributes and Adria videos and art to look forward to.

and maybe now all the unreliable people and drug addicts will be cut out of the picture, as would "the Heartbreakers" and all kinds of mental instability and imature rants in general. who knows. let's hope for the best.

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From Tomfest's article (another great find!) there's what the reporter calls a media release. Q:Am I missing something? I don't see it in tompetty.com site, in news section. They express sincere regret for the hurt, which seems appropriate. 

"Tom Petty’s widow Dana Petty and his two daughters, Adria and Annakim Petty are happy to announce that they have resolved their differences and dismissed all litigation matters that had been filed related to Tom’s estate. Each of them sincerely regrets that in their intense grief over Tom’s tragic death, actions were taken that were hurtful to one another."

There is also a quote attributed to Dana, Adria and Annakim Petty: “We are pleased to announce the formation of Tom Petty Legacy, LLC to manage all aspects of Tom’s Legacy. We are committed to honoring Tom’s voice, music, integrity and his charitable spirit.”

It was also noted that each member has equal standing in Tom Petty Legacy, LLC, which should hopefully help quell any future issues.

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https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/tom-petty-widow-daughters-estate-resolution-legacy-llc-928796/

Spoiler
By 
DANIEL KREPS 

 

 

 

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Tom Petty

Tom Petty's widow Dana Petty and daughters announced they have "resolved their differences and dismissed all litigation matters."

Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP/Shutterstock

Days after quietly reaching an agreement in a long-simmering lawsuit over Tom Petty’s estate, the rocker’s widow Dana Petty and daughters from a previous marriage, Annakim Violette and Adria Petty, announced that both parties have “resolved their differences and dismissed all litigation matters.”

“Each of them sincerely regrets that in their intense grief over Tom’s tragic death, actions were taken that were hurtful to one another,” the estate said.

Now unified, Petty’s family announced a new LLC called Tom Petty Legacy to manage all aspects of the estate. “We are committed to honoring Tom’s voice, music, integrity and his charitable spirit,” Dana, Annakim and Adria Petty said in a joint statement.

Under the terms of the partnership, “Each member of the family will have equal standing in Tom Petty Legacy, LLC and will work together on all future endeavors. The business will build upon Tom’s 40+ years of great music and his historic career.”

 

 

The estate has also aligned with Red Light Management to “guide, advise and execute on behalf of the estate.”

The legal rift between the widow and the daughters reportedly impacted the release of the posthumous collection An American Treasure and nixed a planned 25th anniversary edition of Petty’s acclaimed 1994 album Wildflowers; even with the resolution official, the status of those projects remains unknown.

and saw this while on the site: 

It should be 10 things nearly everyone on the forum already knows, there was one factoid I did not know...(Carl Wilson sang backup vocals on Honey bee... )

https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-features/tom-petty-wildflowers-things-you-didnt-know-904098/

Spoiler
NOVEMBER 1, 2019 8:00AM ET
 
 

Tom Petty’s ‘Wildflowers’: 10 Things You Didn’t Know

 

How label issues, interband tension, and the singer-songwriter’s impending divorce played into his 1994 masterpiece

 

Read 10 things you might not know about Tom Petty's 1994 masterpiece, 'Wildflowers,' on the album's 25th anniversary.

Luciano Viti/Getty Images

In the final years of his life, Tom Petty spoke often about his plan to re-release his 1994 masterpiece Wildflowers as a double album and then play it straight through on a special tour. “I probably haven’t even told the band about this yet,” Petty said in 2016, “but they can read about it in Rolling Stone.” His focus on the LP is easy to understand; song-for-song, it is perhaps Petty’s single greatest achievement. “That was where I was really at the top of my game as far as craft and inspiration colliding at the same moment,” he told Paul Zollo in 2005. “And that one I think I’m most happy with. I think it’s my favorite, just overall.”

The songs range from reflective ballads — like the title track and “Time to Move On” — to fiery rockers like “You Wreck Me” and “Honey Bee.” But all of them are the work of a mature artist who was deep into a career resurgence that began five years earlier with his first solo record, Full Moon Fever. Wildflowers was enormously successful, selling 3 million copies in the U.S. and peaking at Number Eight on the Top 200. To producer Rick Rubin, the album’s sturdiness was a shock. “I think the reason I was surprised has to do with the idea of a grown-up making a good record,” he told Petty biographer Warren Zanes. “When you think of the great songwriters, they weren’t making great albums at that point. I can’t remember what Paul Simon record or what Paul McCartney record came out around that time. But I’m guessing they just weren’t as good.”

 

 

In honor of the 25th anniversary of Wildflowers, here are 10 things you might not know about the LP.

1. Petty’s label nixed his original idea to release Wildflowers as a double LP. 
Wildflowers took two years to make, the longest Petty ever spent on an album. He felt that the stripped-down tracks were strong enough to merit a double LP, but his label advised against it. “When we played it to the record company, [Warner Bros. president] Lenny Waronker listened to it with me and Rick Rubin and said, ‘It’s great but I think it’s too long. You need to cut it down,'” Petty told writer David Browne in 2013. “And we were like, ‘Oh, man, we wanted it to be a double album.’ And he said, ‘Well, it is a double album. The first CD is longer than two vinyl records.'”

2. Several of the outtakes were included on the soundtrack to the 1996 film She’s the One.
Petty didn’t quite know what to do with the Wildflowers outtakes when the record was trimmed down to a single disc. But when he was approached by director Ed Burns — hot off the success of his debut film The Brothers McMullen — to create the soundtrack to his follow-up, romantic comedy She’s the One, he handed over many of the discarded songs. The record was marketed as a new Tom Petty record, much to his dismay.

“I was doing something that went against my grain,” he told Zanes. “Some people thought I was following up Wildflowers. Then, with everything being done at such an incredible rate of speed so that the record could come out with the film — with me making my deadline — they held the film back six months. My record came out with no movie. I was so depressed — that just made me more depressed.”

3. The record marks the official exit of drummer Stan Lynch from the Heartbreakers.
Wildflowers may be a solo Petty record, but many members of the Heartbreakers contributed to it, with the sole exception being longtime drummer Lynch. The relationship between the drummer and Petty had been strained for years, but Wildflowers marked a permanent rift between the two of them. Simply put, Petty was no longer satisfied with Lynch’s drumming style. “I didn’t fit into the music being made,” said Lynch in the 2007 documentary Runnin’ Down a Dream. “I didn’t know how how to fit in. Furthermore, I was too damn old and successful to want to fit in.”

 

 

Steve Ferrone was brought in to play drums on the album, and when Petty fired Lynch, he gave Ferrone his spot in the Heartbreakers.

4. It’s Petty’s divorce album. 
It’s often said that 1999’s Echo is about Petty’s disintegrating relationship to Jane Benyo, his wife of 20 years. But the marriage was already collapsing when Wildflowers was recorded and the songs reflect the pain that Petty was going through at the time. “She’s an honest defector,” he sings on “Time to Move On.” “Conscientious objector/Now her own protector.” “I’ve read that Echo is my divorce album, but Wildflowers is the divorce album,” he told Zanes. “That’s me getting ready to leave. I don’t even know how conscious I was of it when I was writing it … it just took me getting up the guts to leave this huge empire we had built, to walk out.”

5. It was Petty’s first record for Warner Bros. following a messy split with MCA.
Unbeknownst to MCA, Petty had dinner with Warner Bros. chief Mo Ostin in 1989 and secretly signed a contract with the label, even though he owed MCA two more albums. The contract sat in a vault for two years while the band released Into the Great Wide Open and a greatest-hits album, which featured previously unreleased standout “Mary Jane’s Last Dance.” MCA’s Al Teller was furious over Petty leaving the label, but was satisfied at the fact that the compilation album sold 12 million copies, making it Petty’s best-selling album ever.

6. After making Full Moon Fever without most of the Heartbreakers, Petty worked hard to include them on Wildflowers.
Petty’s supporting cast for solo album Full Moon Fever essentially consisted of Heartbreakers guitarist Mike Campbell and producer Jeff Lynne, leaving the rest of the Heartbreakers extremely bitter. “Before the record came out, Stan went all over town telling people that the album sucked, that what I was doing was terrible,” Petty told Zanes. “I think the Heartbreakers were insecure because I did Full Moon Fever and then went into the Traveling Wilburys. They were pissed off.” Ever the loyal frontman, he enlisted the band to record Wildflowers to prevent further strain in the group.

7. Petty performed on Saturday Night Live to promote the record, with Dave Grohl on drums.
With Lynch out of the band, Petty asked Grohl to sit in for an SNL performance that included “You Don’t Know How It Feels” and “Honey Bee.” “It was the first time I had really looked forward to playing the drums since Nirvana had ended,” Grohl recalled in Runnin’ Down a Dream. The show went so well that Petty asked Grohl to join the Heartbreakers, but he had his own plans for his post-Nirvana career. “That was a gas, playing with Dave,” Petty told Zollo. “I even discussed with Dave about joining the band. And he wanted to, but he had his own solo thing developing at the time, the Foo Fighters. And of course, he would rather have done that.”

 

 

8. MTV, VH1, and radio censored the chorus of “You Don’t Know How It Feels.”
The chorus of this swampy, swaggering track was changed from “Let’s roll another joint” to “Let’s hit another joint,” while some versions even played the word “joint” backwards. Similarly, the druggy ditty “Girl on LSD” was deemed too controversial to be included on the album. With lines like “I was in love with a girl on cocaine/She had everything going but a brain,” the song was ultimately made the B side to “You Don’t Know How It Feels.”

9. The record features cameos by Ringo Starr and Carl Wilson.
Beach Boy Carl Wilson sang backing vocals on “Honey Bee” and the outtake “Hung Up and Overdue,” the former featuring a scorching, fuzzed-out guitar intro by Petty. “It was meant to be a release from getting overly serious,” he said of “Honey Bee.” “Because some of those songs get pretty deep, and I think it’s good to have something that clears the mind for a minute.”

For “To Find a Friend,” Petty enlisted a Beatle to play the drums. “It’s a luxury to have musicians of that caliber,” Petty told Zollo. “And Ringo can really just play perfect time all day long. Many drummers today wouldn’t know how to play a song like that. But he knew exactly where to go with it.”

10. After Petty’s sudden death in 2017, the Heartbreakers are openly considering a Wildflowers tour featuring guest singers.
Heartbreakers guitarist Mike Campbell and Crowded House vocalist Neil Finn are currently on the road with Fleetwood Mac, taking over Lindsay Buckingham’s parts. But after that extensive tour wraps up in November, Campbell’s schedule will be open, and he’s said he’s considering embarking on a Wildflowers tour with the rest of the Heartbreakers. “It would be a great tribute to Tom to just do that album,” Campbell told Rolling Stone last year. “We’d probably have four or five different guest singers with us. We don’t know who they might be, though, or when this might

 

 

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17 hours ago, Hoodoo Man said:

Stan's playing is terrible here. You can truly hear he does not understand the direction of the music. His lack of crash cymbal dynamics throughout is a sure-fire sign of a drummer disconnected from his band and the song.

 

 

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4 hours ago, dylanfree said:

 

wow, I don't recall writing that... ;)   

 

It may not be the best version but it's a historic version given it was out before the album was released.  I would wager that Stan was feeling like a cover band playing the song as he was not in the studio as we all know.  It was just a nice surprise for me to see Howie unexpectedly on an early version of the song. I recall watching Letterman at the time and most likely watched this with baited breath when it first aired as I've been a huge Petty fan since the mid 80s.   

YDKHIF can easily turn into a durge with that simple drum beat and it's always a toss up how it will come off live. It was a staple in the set list from this moment on, so for me its more historic and nostalgic than the epitome of renditions.. 

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48 minutes ago, Hoodoo Man said:

for me its more historic and nostalgic than the epitome of renditions.. 

Ok, yeah.. there's a point to that I suppose.

 

50 minutes ago, Hoodoo Man said:

It was just a nice surprise for me to see Howie unexpectedly on an early version of the song. I recall watching Letterman at the time and most likely watched this with baited breath when it first aired as I've been a huge Petty fan since the mid 80s. 

You mean it surprised you now, or it surprised you back then, seeing Howie with the band on this song?! Either way, it really surprises me that it surprises you.. so to speak.. Surely you know Howie was in the band (and thus in the live line-up) from 1982 up to his departure, right. So of course he would be on it when everyone else is, since this is a TPATH performance? Or do I read you wrong?

That Stan accepted doing this at this point is perhaps the one surprise, I suppose. Very kind of him, but given the result perhaps not the best idea. 

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4 minutes ago, Shelter said:

Ok, yeah.. there's a point to that I suppose.

 

You mean it surprised you now, or it surprised you back then, seeing Howie with the band on this song?! Either way, it really surprises me that it surprises you.. so to speak.. Surely you know Howie was in the band (and thus in the live line-up) from 1982 up to his departure, right. So of course he would be on it when everyone else is, since this is a TPATH performance? Or do I read you wrong?

That Stan accepted doing this at this point is perhaps the one surprise, I suppose. Very kind of him, but given the result perhaps not the best idea. 

I know we lost Howie around 2003 without checking sources so to speak. So it was just nice to see him in this video. I don't know when he became unreliable but it was well before his death and around the time Echo was released as he famously was not at the shoot for the album cover.  Stan was out not long after WF came out and I can't recall Howie being on the studio album as the whole band was not there aside for Mike and Benmont although I'd guess he was there for a few tracks as most everyone was at some point.

I think know Scott made an appearance but Stan left the band shortly after this album came out,  so to me it may be one of the last performances of the original line up with Scott and Howie before the New Guy....  When was SNL with Honey Bee and Dave Grhol? Probably very close to the time this came out as it would be part of the promotion for WF.

I also know Howie was last with the band at the Rock and Roll HOF induction and when Ron came back shortly after that so its special to see Stan play this song (even if begrudgingly) and its always lovely to hear Howies harmonies... 💘

Quote

 

WIKI 

Stanley Joseph Lynch (born May 21, 1955) is an American musician, songwriter and record producer. He was the original drummer for Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers for 18 years until his departure in 1994.

 

WF Wiki

 

Outtakes[edit]

  • "Girl on LSD" was released as the B-side of the "You Don't Know How It Feels" single (1994).
  • "Leave Virginia Alone" was another song written and recorded during the sessions and left off the finished album. It was given to Rod Stewart for his album A Spanner in the Works (1995).
  • Several outtakes were included on the She's the One soundtrack album (1996).
  • In 2015, Petty released the track "Somewhere Under Heaven" as promotion for a 20th anniversary two-disc Wildflowers re-release, which has yet to materialize.
  • In 2018, outtake "Lonesome Dave," recorded July 23, 1993, was released on Petty's posthumous box set An American Treasure.

Personnel[edit]

Musicians

  • Mike Campbell – guitars (acoustic, electric, 12-string, slide, bass guitar), harpsichord, coral sitar
  • Lenny Castro – percussion
  • Howie Epstein – backing vocals, bass guitar on "You Wreck Me", "Honey Bee" and "Cabin Down Below"
  • Steve Ferrone – drums except on "To Find a Friend"
  • Brandon Fields – saxophone on "House in the Woods"
  • Gary Herbig – saxophone on "House in the Woods"
  • Jim Horn – saxophone on "House in the Woods"
  • Kim Hutchcroft – saxophone on "House in the Woods"
  • Phil Jones – percussion on "You Wreck Me" and "Cabin Down Below"
  • Michael Kamen  orchestration, conductor on "Wildflowers", "Time to Move On", "It's Good to Be King" and "Wake Up Time"
  • Tom Petty – guitars (acoustic, electric, 12-string, bass guitar), harmonica, piano, Hammond organ, lead and backing vocals
  • John Pierce – bass guitar on "Hard on Me"
  • Marty Rifkin – pedal steel guitar on "House in the Woods"
  • Ringo Starr – drums on "To Find a Friend"
  • Benmont Tench – harmonium, piano, Hammond organ, mellotron, orchestron, zenon
  • Carl Wilson – backing vocals on "Honey Bee"

 

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I also saw the holy grail today on FB, something I have heard of but not seen until now....  pics speak for themselves. I bought 2 copies because of this and have Schrodinger's CD in my basement as I never opened the second copy...  someday. Maybe.... maybe... I like not knowing but realizing its not down there...

84775821_10222222540298888_4326560899335716864_o.thumb.jpg.3b836e6c70757d36c5d6575f10b8141d.jpg84598858_10222222517018306_6822221534384357376_o.thumb.jpg.d34bc505714bbc1d7854054779d601d0.jpg

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16 minutes ago, Hoodoo Man said:

I don't know when he became unreliable but it was well before his death and around the time Echo was released as he famously was not at the shoot for the album cover. 

Yeah.... I still don't get what you're after here. But that's ok.

(Howie may have looked less than fit during the 99 tour, sure. He still delivered. In 99. And he missed the cover of Echo. Yes, also 99. But this mid 90s TV performance and others like it, not to mention endless tour dates both before and years after it, features a quite swinging and functional Howie. I just don't see the mystery in an 95 era live TPATH Howie, not at all.)

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5 hours ago, Hoodoo Man said:

Howie Epstein – backing vocals, bass guitar on "You Wreck Me", "Honey Bee" and "Cabin Down Below"

This is not right. Howie plays and sings harmonies on more songs. Check the booklet.

Howie sings harmonies in YDKHIF. 

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You can also see Stan playing drums on YDKHIF and on Girl on LSD in the Bridge School 94.

 

They also played Time to move on, but to be honest, I don't know if Stan is playing something or if he is just killing time behind the drum kit during this one.

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1 hour ago, Mr Timba said:

This is not right. Howie plays and sings harmonies on more songs. Check the booklet.

Howie sings harmonies in YDKHIF. 

Its wikipedia so it can be incomplete... don't have my CDs near me they are all in the basement and have been for a long time.. Trying to get rid of my CDs and buying some vinyl... :but    if you say Howie was on more than a few tracks I believe it as he was amazing... why wouldn't Tom want him on more tracks? :D  

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