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High Grass Dog

Tributes and covers from peers and writers

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On February 2, 2018 at 10:46 AM, RedfordCowboy said:

The other day I decided to do a Podcast of my memories of Tom Petty. I wanted to share it with this community here. I wasn't sure where to put this, but this thread seemed like the best fit. Like yourself, I'm just a fan, but I felt the need to do it. It is 30 minutes long, just a heads up. If you venture to give it a listen, I hope you enjoy it....

http://saint-creative.com/petty/

Be inspired!

Carl

Hey Carl,

 I listened to your podcast and it's quite the heartfelt tribute to the band,  from that tender moment with your girlfriend to your love for Wildflowers. I can also appreciate your retro take on technology. Good point about choosing music for yourself and that moment of doing it for the first time and how that band/artist becomes significant.

The stories you shared and the discussion of your faith were all very interesting. I'm glad you were able to watch Tom from the 2nd row. While I enjoy people's phone recordings of concerts, savoring the moment is important and I think you made the right choice that night.

  It's interesting to read Tom's peers talk about TPATH but there's always something special about someone not connected to the band or industry sharing his thoughts and feelings,, just speaking from the heart. Thanks for sharing this.

cheers

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Thanks for the bump. Finally got around to listen to this thing, and it's really a great listen. Most of all, thank you Redford! Really inspiring! Great job with the unedited (?) recording too..

Sidestepping the topic a bit, I just like to take a minute to say that the photos aspect of live shows, discussed to some lenght in this podcast, really is an interesting one. The presence of cell phones (and/or cameras with lit screens) at concerts, really IS such a b*ch. I will freely admit how much I despise people that don't care enough about being in the moment, who rather spend their night (like all their other miserable nights in life, right) behind that stupid little screen, broadcasting the whole thing on twitter, snapchat and facebook, overloading the cellphone drive with useless pics. And what's worse, who force me to spend my night behind all their stupid little screens, as well. 

Frankly, I have had more than my share of totally ruined show experiences - I spend lots of money on live music, but a lot of the time I end up at what seems more like dreamhacks - thanks to mindless idiots, who don't deserve to be inside a rock'n'roll venue in the first place. Solution? Well, anyone in a crowd, with an urge to shoot more than two or three pictures at a show, for personal memory, since I can't ask all people to have a working mind after all, should gently but firmly be ushered off to a nearby show room, from where they can view the whole concert from a screen, the way they feel most comfortable, letting the rest of us have our sacred real life experience. The world don't need more crappy long distance cell phone pictures anyway, I am sure we can all agree, and most of the time we don't need more crappy youtube clips either.*  I am so much a fan of the sentiment in Redford's podcast here - and I can't thank him enough for spending a minute to talk about this otherwise often overlooked or ignored issue. What really matters I want to keep for me. And by doing so, I won't ruin the moment for anyone else, either. A win-win. God bless Jack White, basically. 

 

-----

*Ok, so I too enjoy how certain audience recorded live shows show up on file or on youtube. I admit. But if it takes hundreds or thousands of cellphones to be flashed constantly up and down in the field of view, to amount to the usually half-*ssed clip or three that usually show up the day after a show, I much rather wait for the occasional professional photage to surface to get my fix. And sound only recorders doesn't poison the atmosphere for anyone either.  Don't get me wrong, I love the documentary aspect, but I do question the quality for one thing and most of all I do question how the documenting can be so important that it totally wrecks what is being documented.  

 

 

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On March 19, 2018 at 8:39 AM, Shelter said:

Well, anyone in a crowd, with an urge to shoot more than two or three pictures at a show, for personal memory, since I can't ask all people to have a working mind after all, should gently but firmly be ushered off to a nearby show room, from where they can view the whole concert from a screen, the way they feel most comfortable, letting the rest of us have our sacred real life experience. The world don't need more crappy long distance cell phone pictures anyway, I am sure we can all agree, and most of the time we don't need more crappy youtube clips either.*  *Ok, so I too enjoy how certain audience recorded live shows show up on file or on youtube. I admit.

 I empathize, for sure but I've come to really enjoy the live clips online, especially with today's technology; the sound quality and visuals are pretty good and usually free of the crazy-quick-fire editing accompanying too many live videos. Considering how few official live releases let alone concert videos are released, it's great to be able to watch these shows or specific song performances shared by fans.

How fun to actually have one perspective of the stage and what's happening!  Preferably they manage this without ruining the view of the people behind them.

cheers

 

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1 hour ago, MaryJanes2ndLastDance said:

 I empathize, for sure but I've come to really enjoy the live clips online, especially with today's technology; the sound quality and visuals are pretty good and usually free of the crazy-quick-fire editing accompanying too many live videos. Considering how few official live releases let alone concert videos are released, it's great to be able to watch these shows or specific song performances shared by fans.

How fun to actually have one perspective of the stage and what's happening!  Preferably they manage this without ruining the view of the people behind them.

cheers

 

I realize that this is no easy task to plan out, logistically... All I can say is, how hard it is for me to appreciate the hundreds and hundreds of little sceens ruining the experience at the average show these days. The resulting photage being "pretty good" (in your words) or not so much, are usually available within days of the show, but did that really take all that mass moronic behaviour? I wish I'd know in advance who is shooting that one or two decent films, so that I could personally ask all the other idiots who prefer to spend the night behind a screen, to go to.... well... down south... :) If I could chose, I much rather have a splendid phone/camera free night live - there and then - than getting the "pretty good" artefact afterwards.

(I suppose one sollution would be if a venue randomely let only two people with cellphones into the show. Having to sign a contract that they have to film the whole thing and post it online. Great! If anyone suggest I do that dirty work, I'll punch his face. Better yet - like TPATH had a traveling photographer with them on recent tours, and like most shows, if indeed not all these days, are being taped professionally - a house recorder/filmguy would and could be hired to do the work and to post it on the band website, streamable or downloadable for a minimum fee. I realize that won't work for lesser operations, smaller bands and so on... but.. I am just dreaming of a rock and roll experience with all the crap cut, once and for all. Some things are simply not compatible. Sell your computer and buy a guitar if needed. A lot of people just need to choose is what I'm saying. And they need to choose their soul.)

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55 minutes ago, Shelter said:

could be hired to do the work and to post it on the band website, streamable or downloadable for a minimum fee. I realize that won't work for lesser operations, smaller bands and so on... but.. I am just dreaming of a rock and roll experience with all the crap cut, once and for all.

  Like I said, I empathize. I suppose an option would be to ask the person in front of you to move their phone or put it down or something if it's ruining your view and hope they understand.

 Overall, with crowds using their phones, well...one could say that's a bigger issue with society and addiction to social media and their devices. Of all places, using them at a concert is one of the less stupid actions one could take relatively speaking. But at the same time, I get it. To just dance to the music, maybe close your eyes and let it move through you, or focus on one of the band members but whatever you do, fully focus on the present and not trying to capture it for later consumption is important too. But I'd be a hypocrite to say put off your phones when I've reaped the benefit from people taping different shows, ones I've attended and many others I've not.

It's fun to be able to watch live music from different eras that was either kept locked away somewhere or bootlegged at crazy costs for dubious quality.

I believe there's a balance achievable but to find it, well...I don't know.

cheers

 

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I've also railed at people with their phones in the air as well, same with moshers. Hey, I just want to watch this show not smash my body into yours, nor have to spend time dodging your kicks. I guess, as with many things, common courtesy is a good solution or at least, the beginnings of peaceful compromise. And to be fair, at some shows when I asked someone to refrain from doing something that impacted my enjoyment, most I'm pleased to say, were understanding.

I think overall people are good.

ciao

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2 hours ago, MaryJanes2ndLastDance said:

I think overall people are good.

Well, God bless you! 

Not to rain on your parade, but good hearts don't always come with good minds, is my experience. But by all means, there are those that are blessed with both.

That said, I think you are right: the problem is most definitely more universal. People's miserable habit of prioritizing "to appear" - display, image, showing-off (sharing and documenting' s ugly little twins) - over actually being, goes well beyond rock show behaviour. Life through filter. Life second hand. That's what matter to the "good" people. To all people.

(I guess what set the "good" aside from the "bad" in this age of blurred lines tween producing and consuming, is the "bad's" fascinating ways of ever register, calculate effects and abuse and test the limits for "how much we'd pay for what we used to get for free". Don't get wrong. I like paying. I just don't like to pay to the wrong people.)

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20 hours ago, Shelter said:

Well, God bless you! 

 God bless you too, Shelter.

20 hours ago, Shelter said:

People's miserable habit of prioritizing "to appear" - display, image, showing-off (sharing and documenting' s ugly little twins) - over actually being, goes well beyond rock show behaviour. Life through filter. Life second hand.

 No doubt worthy of another topic but since we're on it now; I agree. What has it been called? Triumph of spectacle over substance? Much the way people are treated for alcohol, drugs and gambling addictions I wouldn't be surprised to see people treated for social media/technology usage. I suppose it's the concept of being seen just the right way at just the right events that was there in the past but now magnified by the internet. Bringing it back to the live show experience I recently read what Jack White was doing and didn't like that either as treats the audience as children unable to discipline themselves.

cheers

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Eo8 ON LOCATION: BONNAROO 2018 SUPERJAM!

No matter what brings you to Bonnaroo, no matter what your favorite genre of music, everyone awaits the announcement of the theme and lineup of the festival’s legendary SuperJam!  The Festival has always been known for its collaborative spirit amongst the performing artists, and the SuperJam! has become a semi-organized showcase of collective talent that the Festival has drawn together.

When it was announced that the 2018 SuperJam! was titled “Into the Great Wide Open,” it sparked excitement and a bit of sadness. It was going to be awake for the great Tom Petty, who the music world lost last year.  While even the casual music fan knows Tom Petty’s biggest hits, he had a special connection to Bonnaroo as a repeat headliner for the festival.

As hype around the event grew, many people arrived early, missing out on other shows just to have the best spot to watch the musical memorial.  While in years past, the SuperJam! took on a festive celebrity karaoke party feel, this year’s version was filled with all the conflicting emotions one would expect.   For every up-tempo, hand-clapping song like Durand Jones version of “You Wreck Me,” there was a near tear-jerker, like Vanessa Carlton’s amazingly affectionate, sing-along inducing version of “Learning to Fly.” For every rocker like Sheryl Crow’s take on “American Girl,” there was a bluesy jam like Langhorne Slim getting groovy on “You Don’t Know How It Feels.”  And, of course, Matt Shultz and Nick Bockrath of Cage the Elephant added their own memorable spin to the already quirky style of “Breakdown.”

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Historically, SuperJam! plays host to a multi-artist-centric setlist. While 2018 Bonnaroo broke that trend by sticking solely to Tom Petty songs, there are still some traditions of SuperJam! that stay constant, the most prevalent being trying to guess who will show up that wasn’t on the press release. This year, the crowd didn’t have long to wait—on the second song, Hayley Williams from Paramore brought her own bouncing personality to “Into the Great Wide Open.”  Later, the crowd roared when Justin Vernon of Bon Iver joined Amelia Meath of Sylvan Esso for a duet of “Stop Dragging My Heart Around.”

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With over three hours of music, the SuperJam! was a testament to the songwriting legacy that Petty left behind. Other guests included Rayland Baxter and his father Bucky Baxter (on lap guitar), FrenshipJapanese BreakfastJalen N’GondaLarkin PoeThe Wild FeathersDavid Shaw of the Revivalists, and Sameer Gadhia of Young the Giant.  The evening featured an amazing backing band led by Patrick Hallihan of My Morning Jacket and supported by Pat Blankenship (My Morning Jacket), Pat Sansone (Wilco), Craig Pfunder (VHS or Beta), Mark Heideger (Vandaveer), Daniel Cramer (The Texas Gentlemen), and the Watson Twins.rayland-baxter.jpg?w=700&h=467bucky-baxter.jpg?w=700&h=467

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As I listened to the setlist of songs I knew by heart, I will admit I was at first disappointed but didn’t know why. It then hit me that no one can sing these songs like Tom Petty and I was missing that distinct, twangy, contemplative, touch of sadness soul that elevated his poetic lyrics and made him one of the greatest artists of all time.  After that revelation, it was easy to put the night in the context of a bunch of artists, some who had never even had the chance to rehearse together beforehand, coming together to celebrate the life of one of their own and put on a hell of a show in the process.  The 2018 Bonnaroo SuperJam! was more than a party, it was a (bittersweet) celebration.

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