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11 hours ago, RedfordCowboy said:

TPATH Self Titled.jpg

You really put some time and mind into things. Thanks for the effort and the ever stylish touch. Surely well worth some feedback, response and thoughts:

I had a feeling.. and yeah, I like this as a concept. Of course there are minor aspects to ponder. The t-shirts, yes.. no good! Also, in terms of visual balance.. perhaps either increase the "towering" effect of the band, OR make them boys smaller and increase the size of logo? Don't know.. Maybe it's the smoke.. they need to be more "in it", so to speak.

And speaking of smoke. I've come to realize, that smoke there is - combined with the colors and shape of the logo - the key to this debut LP art concept and vibe, as I see it. And maybe that is why I like those pictures of the guys on the back of the sleeve so much. The smoke. Sure, they are not posing "together", but in individual smaller frames,  but to me that is kinda part of the charm in a way.. The way they look, the very stylized personas coming through the lens, and the picture quality in itself, the.. well.. smokiness.. of it all. Just look at them! Those shots are just perfect and that's why I like what they did with that Gone Gator sampler picture, in making the connection between those "portraits" and the smokey background. The darkness, the light smoke surrounding the pictures and that heart-logo.. some magic quality to that. While your idea is killer too, it's a bit too much of a brighter twist on the YGGI visual concept.

And speaking of YGGI... Since I don't like the font used, but really love the rest of the design, my idea would have been to lift up the line of guys, making it a semi-full body line up, and then to put the heart logo down in the middle. This would work better for me - I think - and it would kinda tie stuff back to the debut. Then there is also the inner sleeve "mirror" picture - later used for some Greatest Hits reprints - that I think is one of the best ever of the band. That could have been used for an alternative YGGI sleeve, of course - why not have that picture only, just as it is but square, the hands holding the mirror.. and then calling the second album "No Second Thoughts".. Ok, now the what-ifs are really starting to run amok here... sorry. 

Now, perhaps lift all the posts here that deal with record sleeve design rather than the LMU album, over to a thread of its own?

 

 

 

 

 

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Ok, nice... If that was in response to anything I said, I'm not sure what. With the colors toned down it looks even more like YGGI.. 😐 But perhaps you are just on a roll, never mind me... 

Btw YGGI may be difficult to fix according to my ideas above, since we can't magically make their legs appear, can we...

 

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Returning to the track list I think the beginning of the record adds or creates its disjointed feel. The record goes from Jamming Me, upbeat rocker to some midtempo, sorta ballad in Runaway Trains, then to a rock number and then a very tender song. And while all of these tunes have high points (though I think the 80s style of RT really hurts it) this combination makes for an awkward, off-putting feel. There's no flow to the first part of the record. Runaway Trains feels like it should be more in the center of the record, something being built towards. Same with It'll All Work Out, one of their most unique gentle songs and it feels like it's in the wrong spot on Side A.

 Side B is a bit better, and I like the way the last three songs go together. I think Jammin' Me and Let Me Up are good to have at one end and the other, both are defiant songs but express the sentiment in different ways. 

While Jammin' Me is a more straightforward rocker, there's something slightly off kilter with the title track that meshes with the more straightforward rocking parts of the song.

Maybe it just comes down to if the record's two sides were e.p.s then they seem a bit better; maybe this is the difference between the vinyl era and the cd one. The physical act of having to flip the record of having a whole new side of emotions is gone with the cd and as taken as one whole experience at once, the album feels of/disjointed. 

Still, either listening to Side A and taking a break or the album as one long experience, no flipping of the vinyl, Jammin' Me into Runaway Trains just doesn't work. It's too abrupt a shift, not in an interesting or experimental way.

I don't know of another record of theirs where I like so many of the songs but when grouped together they just don't work. Attempts at making Southern Accents great with the same tracks on there doesn't work, doesn't matter what order you put those tunes in. Is there an alternate Let Me Up? That double album another forum member suggested? 

Jammin' Me/The Damage You've Done/My Life Your World/Think About me/It'll All Work Out

Runaway Trains/A Self-Made Man/All Mixed-Up/Ain't Love Strange/How Many More Days/Let Me Up

cheers

 

 

 

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May have been mentioned already, but I wonder if to some extent that the disjointedness of Let Me Up (I've Had Enough) was due to the lack of anyone external aside from a handful of engineers. 

Something that I've always found curious is that most of the reviews from the era actually applaud Let Me Up:

"'Let Me Up' is a gloriously positive response--the group's liveliest and most assured work since 'Damn the Torpedoes' eight years ago." - The Los Angeles Times

"This album flows. The lyrics seem almost stream-of-conscious. Everything is compatible, unforced. After eight years, Petty and the Heartbreakers know what they want out of a pop tune. (4 ½ stars)" - Houston Chronicle

"Despite the desperate surrender implied in the title, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers come out standing tough and triumphant on Let Me Up (I've Had Enough). The eleven songs on the album chronicle characters who are reeling from media assaults and shattered relationships. But anger and the urgent need to make sense of a world spinning out of control are strong reasons for survival -- and they are powerfully rendered in the muscular, guitar-charged rock the Heartbrealers hammer out." - Rolling Stone

In hindsight, though...well, it was followed up by Full Moon Fever. 

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3 hours ago, nobodyinparticular said:

In hindsight, though...well, it was followed up by Full Moon Fever. 

Interesting reviews. It's lively to a degree but I think most of these reviews apply more to Long After Dark. What a transition, I wonder for people who bought these records chronologically, what they made of FMF after LMU?

cheers

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4 hours ago, MaryJanes2ndLastDance said:

Interesting reviews. It's lively to a degree but I think most of these reviews apply more to Long After Dark. What a transition, I wonder for people who bought these records chronologically, what they made of FMF after LMU?

cheers

Ahem, obviously you mean transition through:

Southern Accents

The Bob Tour 

Let Me Up

Wilburys (with Bob & George & Jeff & Roy)

then Full Moon Fever

Well, speaking for myself -I'm common - I remember liking it & just accepting that they were exploring new territory. But it took me ages to come back down from the thrill that they were a) playing alongside Bob Dylan & then there was b) the musical thrill of the Wilbury explosion which came out of nowhere.  It was music I liked that also had music credibility (ie even snooty band musicians gave them the thumbs up, even though they were creating also increasingly popular songs). 

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9 minutes ago, Big Blue Sky said:

Southern Accents

The Bob Tour 

Let Me Up

Wilburys (with Bob & George & Jeff & Roy)

then Full Moon Fever

I appreciate your take, common or not, ha ha!

 I don't like Bob Dylan so I forget they even toured with him. The most entertaining thing to come from that was Stan cutting out from rehearsal (?) and taking Bob to a concert.

The Wilburys to me sound quite different from TPATH.

The shift from LMU to FMF is huge in almost every way, not just songwriting but Tom's singing, the actual sound of the record and on and on, the whole energy is completely new and I would've thought invigorating. However, I guess if one was very much attached to the Heartbreaker's sound it might've been quite the shock. 

13 minutes ago, Big Blue Sky said:

- I remember liking it & just accepting that they were exploring new territory

Thanks for the answer. That's good that you just went with it.

cheers

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2 minutes ago, MaryJanes2ndLastDance said:

I don't like Bob Dylan so I forget they even toured with him. The most entertaining thing to come from that was Stan cutting out from rehearsal (?) and taking Bob to a concert.

From here: https://www.thepettyarchives.com/archives/magazines/1990s/1990-04-musician

"I took Dylan to see Sammy and Frank at the Greek Theatre," Stan announces. "My dream date with Bob. That's a true story. The first week of rehearsals for the Dylan tour, Dylan hadn't spoken to us all week. We were all playing and I said, 'Look, I gotta bug out early tonight.' And they go, 'Lynch, what's your crisis?' I go, 'I got tickets for Sammy and Frank at the Greek.' The whole band covers their eyes going, 'Oh geez, I can't believe he really said that.' And Dylan looked up at me in all seriousness and said, 'Sammy and Frank? I love those guys.' So Dylan and I went to the Greek. I really didn't know who to look at! I don't mind saying I was a little starstruck by the whole concept that I came from Gainesville to L.A., and now I'm sitting with Bob Dylan watching Sammy Davis and Frank Sinatra."

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Haha, each to their own.  Have been putting myself back there to remember more clearly.  

First, I was raised on Bob and his time with The Band, well, not played  in my family home, but by friends' parents, so it's not whether you like him or not. He just is. 

I think 1987 release: I heard Jamming Me & saw it on MTV but when I went to record shop mid-week I thought ripped album cover was really ugly. I didn't buy it, thinking I'd get it later. I think I listened to whole album on holiday (friend's place) and thought it was dirty, loose, & they'd been influenced by touring with Bob Dylan  (in a good way).  

On the video for Jammin Me, Tom created that us against the world vibe & the sneer.  Just leave me alone! Which was a vibe I could relate to a that time.  Also, an earring had appeared. But they kept cutting away from Mike, so couldn't see his guitar work.  I also remember traveling back & forth a lot that year & I remember those songs with roadside visuals, so I guess we put it on in the car. 

And a friend had Southern Accents (from before) so I played it at their place.

Anything by TPATH was as good as or better than the other big bands around at the time. Plus, TPATH always retained their cred  & never nose-dived into truly awful territory like other bands or musicians. So they were reliably interesting while the others fell away.  

But the Wilbury explosion was a whole new direction.  I believe the phrase: "you're fucking kidding me" was used a lot, like after every single sentence: George Harrison is in a new band. The video for Handle Me With Care. Bob Dylan too. George and Bob.  Is that Roy Orbison? The blond one is that Tom Petty? The guitar sound. Technicality of it being recorded on one microphone that someone went on and on about.  

But that's another thread. 😀

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I also assumed for many years that  they recorded Let Me Up a bit at a time, while out on tour with Bob Dylan. So, different songs recorded at different studios or venues (but not live) and when they had time, compiled into one album. So that's why it wasn't - as I'd now say - as polished & tidy as some earlier albums. 

No idea where I got that idea from. It's probably quite wrong. Though I guess it is sort of true, in that songs did emerge from different sources.

Maybe I swallowed a truth serum, as I'm over-sharing here! 

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58 minutes ago, Big Blue Sky said:

On the video for Jammin Me, Tom created that us against the world vibe & the sneer.  Just leave me alone! Which was a vibe I could relate to a that time.  Also, an earring had appeared. But they kept cutting away from Mike, so couldn't see his guitar work.

Oh damn, the Jammin' Me video. I have to be careful watching it because all the flashing backgrounds and stuff can set off a migraine under certain circumstances. (The strobe effects at the end of "Don't Come Around Here No More" in Take the Highway are downright nauseating.)

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9 hours ago, MaryJanes2ndLastDance said:

What a transition, I wonder for people who bought these records chronologically, what they made of FMF after LMU?

Yeah, that is interesting to me. As so often happens.. lots of interesting ideas and possible discussions in this.

I think I've gone into rant mode about this before - perhaps even in this thread - but to me Tom's 80's journey is most fascinating. After hitting the ground running, fresh outta the big break with Torpedoes, by his own admission soon to be a bit stuck with the Iovine vision - perhaps wanting to move on and to up things the final notch to mature rock legend level - he entered the mid 80's slightly lost, looking for direction. Supposedly the black stars (of artificial sound ideals, lack of personal and professional direction and strange consultants) were perfectly aligned at the time, but no matter the ingredients and reasons of the confusion and struggle, as evidence has it Tom and The Heartbreakers worked hard, looked hard for the road forward, starting with the ambition to create a grand mansion of a concept album, eventually released with the chimney duly raised, but with all kinds of scrap and debris as supporting structure, some of the rooms strangely furnished and some even missing. Construction site left in frustration, all props left as they were, as if it was all still the grand concept imagined, and relying on new hopes that an ambitious Vegas-styled tour would sell the spoof and make the recent shortcomings less obvious to the market. Most importantly, it would keep the workers themselves busy running. Full steam ahead, but really where to. Ok, hindsight, I knew... but still.. 

Enters Bob. A fork in the road, if I ever seen one. Hitting the road with Bob Dylan in 1986-87 obviously was a huge leap in terms of inspiration and development for the band, no? But while all that did move the band forward as a live band*, it kept them from untying the knot of their own artistic vision, what direction to prolific and flowing songwriting and recording. Which way to something better... which way do I go?* 

That goes to say that by the LMU sessions (in late 1986, supposedly) TPATH were a better live band and better individual musicians than they' ever been. Yet, in the studio they were seemingly more confused than ever. Story has it that they really wanted the LMU album to reflect the live sound and the authentic here and now presence they took with them from a long year of touring. But, seriously... What happened?! Seems to me they again ended up in the same mess and lack of direction that had made the Southern Accent grand mansion a shining shack. 

Still the years with Bob must have started something with Tom. And by 1988, involving socially with Jeff and George, all of a sudden something kicked in, a new level, a new flow, the mature rocker emerged, finally, the good stars was aligning at long last. Frankly, it's amazing to me to see the change in approach, in tone and outlook, in Tom between late 1987 and early 1988. Seriously! It cannot only be hindsight, but what a "transition" that took place between first getting involved with Jeff's and George's sphere in October of 1987 and starting the first recordings for FMF and TW within a month or two. It seems to me that in less than half a year, Tom emerged a totally different cat. Relaxed, with a direction and purpose, spot on, overflowing with great songs.** It's all very magical. It's as if an actual full moon fever had put a spell on everyone.  

Seen in this context, LMU and FMF, while such close kins in origin, may indeed be seen as stemming from opposite sides of a sharp defining line. Still, I find it interesting to try to avoid that type of over dramatic black or white explanations. Was there evidence inside LMU of what was to come? Was there mid 80's TPATH qualities still lingering on FMF? Yes to both, and plenty of it. And here goes what blurr some of the sharp lines drawn above:

As I've said before, there seem to be a certain Bob (for obvious reasons) or TW quality already on Jammin Me. If with more sneer and attitude. There is a certain Last Night vibe already on All Mixed Up, that sometimes makes me wonder where and when the former really came from originally. A Self Made Man seem also very close in spririt to TW, in delivery and in stomp. It'll All Work Out... certainly could have found it's place on FMF, if still available. Or on ITGWO or Wildflowers or most TP/TPATH albums, for that matter.*** Then, let's jump to the "new era", have a look at the light, seemingly effortless touch of FMF, sunny and playful, yet soaked in some special gravity and mature outlook. Probably so unhip that it's probably hip. I said it before (to no effect that I can remember, but still) but isn't there some real, honest and ripping live band vibe to Love Is A Long Road? Am I wrong to feel that it could easily have been a  LMU leftover, that it could have sat perfectly on that album, even have helped to straighten it out some, keeping its focus? It's such a LMU song in character, to me.. only much better, handled with such more grace and finesse. Classic TPATH rock, exactly the way LMU was intended according to witnesses. No wonder LIALR made a perfect live staple in time. And what about A Mind With An Heart of It's Own? Is it just me, or does that song hit the transition line and split it in two, kinda. It sure has the typical FMF approach and easy going delivery. The breezy feel too. But isn't there some good old jam rock a la Not Fade Away built in there, something that sure could have found a place on band project LMU and quite outshined a much less effective effort like Think About Me, not to mention generally confusing offerings like My Life/Your World?****

Now, I'm not saying those songs were even half way written in time for LMU sessions, I'm just saying, there were unmistakably a much slower ongoing processes, despite the fact that in the eyes of the average beholder it may have seemed a brand new Tom Petty showing up in 1989, that unknown guy from the Traveling Wilburys, you know.. groovy, baby! When really, it's not that easy. And.. finally.. then again, didn't they bypass all of it.. going straight for the timeless and undying, when they cut that intro to My Life / Your World? 30 seconds, in themselves worth to buy the whole 41 minutes for? It is questionable if they managed to sound as positively effortless and in touch with their roots even by Wildflowers, as they did right there. A strange, odd moment on a TPATH record, that, if I ever heard one.

Ok, then. You are now let up.
 

-----

* And let's not forget their own 1985 tour also was very ambitious, on a scale and with a stage production, unprecedented with this band. The live years of 1985- 1987 really saw they band climbing the latter, so to speak, becoming even more full fledged and dynamic than they had been. 

**Still, supposedly, sessions for a new TPATH album, to capture that new spirit of Tom's, came to nothing, which perhaps needs to be attributed to internal differences and bitterness (other Heartbreakers may not have been as blessed and "released" as had Tom) and Jeff's supposed influence, that may have helped steering Tom away from thinking in terms of band, maybe for the first time)

***A very universally Tom Petty:ish song, that, as I hear it. And perhaps one of the first songs that really showcase Tom successfully a fully mature songwriting style with credibility. For his age, he was very skilled and experience in the field from the start, though, wasn't he? Some really early stuff is really impressinve

**** One thing that really defines their mid 80s to me, is the urge to pen and record "out of character" songs. A proof in itself that Tom was searching, he did try some very different stuff and not in a good way. Both before and after he has graced his albums with occasional oddball tracks, or slightly warped stuff that makes for deepening his songwriting persona and makes things fun. From Luna to Sins of My Youth, there's been degrees of bending the down home formulas some. But in the 80s he seem to quite suddenly lost his ability to hit the right spot with those. (Maybe losing the focus and direction, means losing the sense of counter beat too...?)   All of a sudden there was It Ain't Nothing To Me, Make It Better, Spike, Don't Come Around Here No More, My Life/Your World,  

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, Shelter said:

...as evidence has it Tom and The Heartbreakers worked hard, looked hard for the road forward, starting with the ambition to create a grand mansion of a concept album, eventually released with the chimney duly raised, but with all kinds of scrap and debris as supporting structure, some of the rooms strangely furnished and some even missing.

Construction site left in frustration, all props left as they were, as if it was all still the grand concept imagined, and relying on new hopes that an ambitious Vegas-styled tour would sell the spoof and make the recent shortcomings less obvious to the market. Most importantly, it would keep the workers themselves busy running. Full steam ahead, but really where to.

Wow! That is really well written.

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53 minutes ago, MaryJanes2ndLastDance said:

Wow! That is really well written.

Thank you. Most kind of you to say. That was indeed the "chimney" of my post. In terms of analogy at least. Glad it sat well with you.

Some of the rest may hopefully be sentiments worthy some reflexion too, though. Although, admittedly I did leave a good deal "scrap and debris" myself there, seeing how the last two footnotes were left unfinished.. (Oops!) Not that such questionable tactics sink the overall points made, surely. But it's a shame on some good thinking (ha!) and ultimately it may make people less eager to jump in to discuss or share counter insight (yeah, right). Or to even just fathom what the post was about. Either way, my bad.

,

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On February 7, 2019 at 6:53 AM, Shelter said:

A Self Made Man seem also very close in spririt to TW, in delivery and in stomp. It'll All Work Out... certainly could have found it's place on FMF, if still available. Or on ITGWO or Wildflowers or most TP/TPATH albums, for that matter.*** Then, let's jump to the "new era", have a look at the light, seemingly effortless touch of FMF, sunny and playful, yet soaked in some special gravity and mature outlook. Probably so unhip that it's probably hip. I said it before (to no effect that I can remember, but still) but isn't there some real, honest and ripping live band vibe to Love Is A Long Road? Am I wrong to feel that it could easily have been a  LMU leftover, that it could have sat perfectly on that album, even have helped to straighten it out some, keeping its focus? It's such a LMU song in character, to me.. only much better,

Really good insights here on how the songs could've fit on other albums and your take on the spirit of the songwriting. Love is a Long Road could've been on that record and would've tightened it up quite a bit. FMF and LMU are mirror images almost, I like the songs on both but FMF is a pleasure to listen to.

cheers

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On February 7, 2019 at 6:53 AM, Shelter said:

Was there evidence inside LMU of what was to come? Was there mid 80's TPATH qualities still lingering on FMF? Yes to both, and plenty of it. And here goes what blurr some of the sharp lines drawn above:

It's interesting how some songs from LMU could've fit on other albums or were precursors, or at least contained precursors, and yet all of these songs grouped together make for a disappointing listen. I think Hypnotic Eye is a much better focused album with an amazing flow, tighter songwriting and is a TPATH classic.

But there's no reason on the surface to think why LMU couldn't be like that. Just an album before they released Long After Dark which was darn good.

Is it the song order? Just one of those unknown qualities, as much a mystery as songwriting itself?

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"Disappointing listen" for you maybe. I like listening to Let Me Up as a whole. Also, I appreciate that, even though there were other demands on their time, they stayed with it and carried their album all the way through from earliest stages to seeing vinyls /CDs on record shop shelves. So, it is what it is... take it or leave it... a selection from whatever music they were creating at that time. (An approach to albums that's characteristic of Bob Dylan, according to many Bobologists). Also, no hands were damaged in the making of the album, so that's an improvement from Southern Accents right there.

  •  I'm wondering if some of this discontent people feel about the album is due to the difference between a) what's included in Let Me Up and b) both the rich diversity of their live shows 1986/87 AND all the other music they were creating / recording In 1986/87.  I'm guessing there are bootlegs of concerts 1986/87 that some people enjoy much more than Let Me Up.  True?
  • Do some people react to Let Me Up album with a feeling of frustration: "Of all their music  available, why'd they choose those songs... and why'd they sequence (create a set list for the album) & mix the sound like that?"

How true would that be? 

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8 minutes ago, Big Blue Sky said:

I like listening to Let Me Up as a whole.

Interesting. There aren't too many people on here who have said that. Or if they have I've missed it.

8 minutes ago, Big Blue Sky said:

a selection from whatever music they were creating at that time. (An approach to albums

Aside from the concept albums I figure this is pretty much how they usually worked. Whatever songs they came up with were put into some order for maximum emotional effect. This right here would be an interesting question for someone in the band, the actual decision making process for the albums and why some songs ended up cut. I think Hypnotic Eye had more of a definite shape to it as well, like SA and Last DJ since Tom wanted to make a more rocking album and left off some of the tunes that felt closer to Mojo. Anyway, your point, well, aside from those exceptions it's what I'm guessing their approach was, making a selection from whatever they created at the time. For me, few of their albums work as whole albums as records I want to hear from beginning to end. LMU is odd, well for the reasons I've already expressed.

12 minutes ago, Big Blue Sky said:

I'm guessing there are bootlegs of concerts 1986/87 that some people enjoy much more than Let Me Up.  True?

Maybe. I don't know. I do like the live version of Jamming Me they did on this tour and Runaway Trains. I think playing My Life/Your World was an inspired choice too.

13 minutes ago, Big Blue Sky said:

Do some people react to Let Me Up album with a feeling of frustration: "Of all their music  available, why'd they choose those songs... and why'd they sequence (create a set list for the album) & mix the sound like that?"

Good question. Rightly or wrongly my perception is the popular perception is this is an unpopular album or at least, one of the lesser regarded ones. The songs seem good for the most part, for me, it's maybe collecting them all like they did. I don't think I've heard enough of the other songs from this time to know if I'd like them any more than these. Like I said earlier, I think there are more good songs on this record than Southern Accents. 

Do most people on here listen to TPATH albums all the way through? I figure yes and I'm in the minority, there's usually half to a third of tracks I skip because they don't appeal to me and rarely grow on me in time the way other songs do. I think DTT/Long After Dark/FMF and Hypnotic Eye are their most consistent records, where even the weaker tracks work as a whole. 

cheers

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Other songs from that time - oh, sure you have, you might not realise it off the top of your head - King Of The Hill is just one, even though it was officially released later.

Here's link to an funny / interesting blog called xist.blogspot.com "Albums that Should Exist." They suggest a TPATH album called "Waiting For Tonight - Various Songs", they feel should have been released in 1988. You can even download it, if you want.

  •  Got My Mind Made Up
  • Can't Get Her Out 
  • Ways To Be Wicked
  • You Came Through
  • Tonight Might Be My Night
  • There Ain't Enough Money 
  • Make That Connection
  • King Of The Hill (with Roger McGuinn)
  • Don't Treat Me Like A Stranger
  • Goodbye Little Rich Girl
  • Travelin'
  • Down The Line
  • Waiting For Tonight (with The Bangles)
  • Last Night with Tom singing lead (as a bonus track by Wilburys)

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That's an interesting list. Pretty good too. There's a recent topic on here about these LMU songs, or what could've been a different album.

Anyway, I'd cut King of the hill, Roger McGuinn's a pass for me. I'd also knock off the Wilburys song and leave a pretty good run of TPATH tunes.

Though now I think about it, too bad they didn't add Waiting for Tonight to Greatest Hits along with MJLD and Something In the Air. I think it would've been the unprecedented second new song greatest hit on there in addition to MJLD. It's such a good song, a perfect pop-rock song with the Bangles voices, oh that would've been a huge song.

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10 hours ago, Big Blue Sky said:
  •  Got My Mind Made Up
  • Can't Get Her Out 
  • Ways To Be Wicked
  • You Came Through
  • Tonight Might Be My Night
  • There Ain't Enough Money 
  • Make That Connection
  • King Of The Hill (with Roger McGuinn)
  • Don't Treat Me Like A Stranger
  • Goodbye Little Rich Girl
  • Travelin'
  • Down The Line
  • Waiting For Tonight (with The Bangles)
  • Last Night with Tom singing lead (as a bonus track by Wilburys)

The songs on that that list - more or less all of them and maybe then some (Moon Pie!) - have been discussed here in the past, w/r/t the cancelled/derailed TPATH sessions of 1987/88, aimed at a LMU follow-up, but resulting in a Tom Petty solo record project. Which reminds me of something I just read somewhere... oh, yeah.. right... 

On ‎2‎/‎7‎/‎2019 at 12:53 PM, Shelter said:

**Still, supposedly, sessions for a new TPATH album, to capture that new spirit of Tom's, came to nothing, which perhaps needs to be attributed to internal differences and bitterness (other Heartbreakers may not have been as blessed and "released" as had Tom) and Jeff's supposed influence, that may have helped steering Tom away from thinking in terms of band, maybe for the first time)

Either way, whatever the reasons for those sessions to break apart, looking at those songs listed and thinking how some of those titles certainly were around as an option already during the LMU sessions, it's easy to imagine different alternative paths. Sure. But it may be worth mentioning that far from all of those were on the table by the time of LMU recordings. And as far as imagining this as a potential 88-89 TPATH album, I further think it's weird to include the already released Got My Mind Made Up (on Bob's masterpiece(?) Knocked Out Loaded), the 85 b-side Make That Connection, the TW song Last Night (unless rerecorded with TPATH, and.. nah.. ) and a bit of a stretch with King of The Hill too (awesome song, IMO, one of the best ever to have been written in the 1980s, but it no doubt belongs with Roger!).

Still, the remaining list is 10 tracks, so there still is plenty to ponder in ways of an imaginable TPATH album, had fate worked differently. As for me, though, I'm not sure those 10 songs would have worked as an album. And what's more, the interesting aspect to me, trying to reconstruct a time line here, is first if all, what songs were already "in the process of becoming", so to speak, when TPATH closed the books on the LMU sessions? That is, what songs did Tom have at that point and what songs did they actually try, or at least ponder already for LMU?*

An then, to complicate stuff even further, I suppose lines get easily blurred here. Tom's collaboration with Jeff/George started fairly early on after the 1987 Bob tour, and both some of Tom's writing and some of the cutting of songs that was put aside, seem to have predated the 1988 TPATH sessions (and may perhaps have been one of many reasons why the sessions didn't fared well). This makes songs like Don't Treat Me Like a Stranger hard to nail down. Was it recorded already for the supposed TPATH album, or was it - like I think - recorded with the solo project in mind all along. What about Down The Line? That one, although produced by Jeff, seem more likely to have originated as a TPATH song to me. Considering the mess of sessions and projects that all of the Petty universe found itself being spin-dried in during late 87 to early 89, it's really hard to say what was really, for a fact, the stuff he/they considered for the cancelled TPATH album. Chances are they didn't really know themselves, and that the sessions never got further than them trying a few leftovers and work-in-progress stuff from the LMU sessions and one or two "new songs" that Tom didn't think he'd have use for inside his new exciting Jeff project. And as for Waiting for Tonight, it's apparently a TPATH recording, right? Still I think I understand it to be cut during some intermission period when FMF was not yet a fully envisioned project and the 88 TPATH album sessions had already derailed.

Just saying.. this is an unusually messy mess, in terms of sessions details and discography background info. But of course everyone is free to compile their own imagined albums anyway they want. As for me, I don't think there was never enough good stuff to finish that "88" album, from all the facts we have today. And to the extent that there was, chances are that without a producer and someone to really give it to them straight, it wouldn't have been much fuller in sound or vision than was LMU. (On the other hand, with a guiding hand towards the sound and selection - perhaps sequencing, well.. not sure about that - LMU would perhaps also have run somewhat differently and sounded a lot more like the "live snapshot of where we're at as a band" that they imagined - right, that is very Bob - in theory! - but even Bob didn't always find his ways to make it happen in practice. Chances are, then, that TPATH would have had even less to work with in 1988... so.. let's not go further than necessary into the what-ifs of this.) 

In conclusion, that list there, even if it contains a few great songs, is really making a chicken of a feather, I think. And a weird and far fetched chicken at that. Cuckoo, I say. There is indeed, many ways to be wicked.

Enough of that.

 

-----

*According to my notes, a case could be made that they tried at least Ways To Be Wicked and You Come Through for inclusion and decided against them.  
 

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3 hours ago, Shelter said:

The songs on that that list - more or less all of them and maybe then some (Moon Pie!)

I love that they jammed at Red Rocks and played Swingin', especially if there were fans in that audience who had a hankerin' for that song but they could've also played It's Rainin' Again. Another underrated song of theirs. It's Rain-in'' Agaaain. I suppose Louisiana Rain could've worked as well but I much prefer It's Rainin' Again. Much like Two Men Talking, a lot done with very little. 

Does the song not conjure up the image of Tom and the boys standing on a ramshackle porch in the south, sittin' on rockers, maybe Mike on the rail as a light rain falls? I really enjoyed when they'd play strange little numbers like this and Moon Pie.

cheers

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