Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Was going to make this its own topic but I think Jammin Me is one of their best uptempo songs. You'd think the Joe Piscopo, Eddie Murphy lines would've really dated it but I just hear their names divorced from who they are in life, here they're just part of the lyrics in the song. I quite the like the version they did on this tour with the sparse chords and mellow beginning on the keys before the song kicks in.

I'm glad they played it a lot during the Fillmore Run and carried it over to the Echo Tour. I must say I was quite happily surprised when I saw this one in concert.

It seems like it was a bit of a hit single, yet never took off, never got a spot on Greatest Hits, which is a shame as I think it would've been played a lot more in concert had it been; I also think it was large enough at the time, especially with the video.

What do you all think of this song? I think both versions, Stan and Steve are good, very popppin'!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/23/2018 at 1:28 PM, martin03345 said:

It'll All Work Out is overrated. Just about every acoustical composition ever but to tape is overrated lol

I'm an admitted sucker for mandolin, especially Mike playing mandolin.  He could play, like, two chords on a mandolin and I'm swooning, lol.

2 hours ago, MaryJanes2ndLastDance said:

What do you all think of this song? I think both versions, Stan and Steve are good, very popppin'!

I like it, I think it expresses enough of the traditional values while being of its' time.  It has that driving quality that I believe we tend to associate with their sound and Tom's vocal is really great.

As far as the album goes, my opinion is highly emotional and nostalgic because I consider it a last gasp of sorts, that spirit of unity.  I'm not the biggest fan of Shipley's mix, though.  It's interesting because I admit the songwriting is weak in spots but everyone is playing so well, that's what I enjoy about it.  It's not the best from a sonic perspective or arrangement-wise but I enjoy it as a snapshot of that time, and some of the songs give me all the feels.  It makes me a bit sad to compare how they felt about it when they were publicizing it versus how they assessed it in the documentary.  Not that I would have told them how to process their emotions but dang, just say: "We had a good time making it, but it didn't sell."  Don't tell me that this album I lived with and loved is terrible.  LOL  Anyway, it holds up better for me that the two TPATH studio releases on either side of it, but that's just me.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, chimera said:

I consider it a last gasp of sorts, that spirit of unity.    Not that I would have told them how to process their emotions but dang, just say: "We had a good time making it, but it didn't sell."  Don't tell me that this album I lived with and loved is terrible.  LOL  Anyway, it holds up better for me that the two TPATH studio releases on either side of it, but that's just me.

Thanks for sharing. I agree about the "last gasp." I sometimes have to ignore what my favorite musicians or whomever say about their work too. It's interesting hearing from people who really like or love this record, since it seems like a minority opinion, heck, maybe it isn't, maybe it's a quiet classic amongst the fans...!

cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, MuddyandMagnolia said:

I have a copy I would like to sell to someone - that says it all right there

(although Jammin me, cute Dylan/Petty joint) 

 

Ha ha, really? Do you not even like the title track. Much like Finding Out I think it's a shame they never played it live as I think it rocks!

cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, MaryJanes2ndLastDance said:

Ha ha, really? Do you not even like the title track. Much like Finding Out I think it's a shame they never played it live as I think it rocks!

cheers

Serious is as serious does my dear MaryJane, although about to also list I am selling my Super-Duper pre-release American Treasure as well ... but really - does ANYONE want this Vinyl? Yeah ... TOM should NOT have been in dark purple (#obnoxiouscover haha)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OH btw - I don't mind the title track, there are some goodies on there - it's not all awful, but as far as albums go, I have never heard Tom want to discuss it, you could tell how much he was just laying on the mixing boards going "G-d get this over with please...." 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, MuddyandMagnolia said:

 TOM should NOT have been in dark purple (#obnoxiouscover haha)

An interesting idea for the cover but in execution it was terrible. Could be their worst one ever, I just don't like looking at it. Sums up the hodgepodge feeling of the record, all good parts but a weak whole.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting.. let's see a ranking of the albums cover art. Isn't there someone somewhere. HC ranks among the worst for me. And unlike most I don't find DTT as genius as many seem to think. The shades of red clashes and make my brain scream silently. Anyway.. LMU is strange. They should have gone with the inner as an outter on that one.. Also, the LMU striped concept, if not as "fair", looks visually better horizontally as on JM single.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Shelter said:

Interesting.. let's see a ranking of the albums cover art. 

👏💟

Live Anthology - image of TP & guitar + the details in the artwork encircling it creates something special

Mudcrutch 2 - bear cubs & nomadic shelter

Long After Dark - TP & guitar

Pack Up The Plantation - TP & guitar & planet suit 

Last DJ - for creating recognisable iconic image from a single detail (ie that long hair)

Traveling Wilburys 1 - cover + liner notes (by Monty Pythons!!!) For creating & maintaining fictional characters

 

Special honorable mentions for:

Mudcrutch 1 (faceless hipster) 

Traveling Wilburys 3 (Bob Dylan's hat - is it a back-to-front cap or a kippah or a knotted hankie?)

Southern Accents (oil painting hanging in The Met in NY)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But not American Treasure or Kiss My Amps, just for now. It's because those lovely images were used in, you know, official announcements of the sad news. Not to bring us down. 

Bear cubs are in with chance of being voted #1 cover, especially in absence of any hand-holding otters on these album covers.:wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also Blue Stingrays!!!

I like Hard Promises record shop, but who's that random guy in leather jacket browsing the racks??

Okay. Two last awesome covers featuring whole band: You're Gonna Get It's moody blue image, with TP wearing a turtleneck.  (Warm and cool at same time).

And the back cover of Great Wide Open, with that exquisite handcrafted beading.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also cover image on You Should Be So Lucky of Benmont playing grand piano.

Mindbender has special place, obviously, when considering album art. Love the album, but something about the blue swirls just triggers vertigo (for me), so I keep it safe in a brown paper bag when not playing it yet again. 🌀🌖

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Shelter said:

Interesting.. let's see a ranking of the albums cover art.

Honestly, when I think of TPATH's catalog, I don't imagine them very high in the iconic album cover department. Not too many album covers stand out as classic to me...(ie. a Dark Side of the Moon, Abbey Road, Led Zeppelin I, Aladdin Sane, What's Going On, Born to Run, London Calling, Insert Your Favorite Here_________) That being said, we know art is subjective, and beauty is in the eye of the beholder. There are several covers that I love that don't make it on any iconic album artwork list. Beck's Morning Phase and Band of Horses' Infinity Arms come to mind.

So, here's my take on TPATH album artwork.

My favorite might be the Greatest Hits cover (1993 version. Love the warped/wavy psychedelic band photo, with colored faces. Like a Fillmore poster from a different era. Also the first TP album I bought, so that might factor into it...Just sayin')


Pretty great:

- Full Moon Fever (love the colorful gradient background, feels bright and happy. Might have the happiest photo of Tom on the back cover. We know he was flying high and in a happy place during this era. Perfect cover for a perfect album)

- TPATH (I've always dug their first album cover! Cool introduction to TP, has some attitude)

- Southern Accents (feels intriguing, feels like it wants to compliment the concept album that never quite came to be)

- ITGWO (feels warm, whimsical, and strangely out of place for 1991/1992)

Pretty mediocre:

- Wildflowers (I don't mind the minimal treatment, craft/tan texture reminds me of Neil Young's Harvest)

- DDT (classic album obviously, fairly iconic shot of Tom, yet not quite an iconic cover, in my book. Not bad though)

- She's the One (mixing photos of the band with the actors messes with me, dilutes the power of the album)

- You're Gonna Get it (doesn't grab me, or say much)

- Hard Promises (see above)

- Long After Dark (see above)

- Mojo (see above. Love the "MOJO" icon with all 4 letters connected. Super cool)

- Mudcrutch (dig the colorfulness again. LOVE the back cover embroidery artwork!)

- Hypnotic Eye (nice graphic design. The only TP LP that has the track listing on the cover, which I love)

Pretty poor:

- Last DJ (probably my least favorite. The back of his head, the angle, the black and white, all of it)

- Mudcrutch 2 (but I love the horse/rider insert card!)

- Let Me Up (Ugh...)

- Highway Companion (just does not fit the mood and theme of this record!)


Again, just my take. The bulk of them I put in the middle-of-road category. Neither here nor there.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, RedfordCowboy said:

So, here's my take on TPATH album artwork.

Nice breakdown.

I agree and it's been discussed on here before that TPATH are not known for interesting album covers. Why that is I'm not sure. Certainly there were a few that stood out creatively and at least Let Me Up tried to be different though it resulted in a ghastly image. Why so many shots of Tom or the band? From the dreariness of Echo to the dullness of You're Gonna Get It, it's a rogues gallery of dull imagery. I guess I do like the cover to Hard Promises though, it looks candid.

I love the cover to Highway Companion, best thing about the album. I see it as the Astronaut came to rescue his little monkey pal who'd been sent off into space way before.

Into The Great Wide Open matches the title and is open, inviting and warm.

Hypnotic Eye is an attempt at something different that works and I also like having the song titles on the front.

Southern Accents is just a great painting.

I'd have preferred more of the interior art of Full Moon Fever instead of the image chosen. Same with the Last DJ, I really like the minimalist drawings, one of those or a new one could've been the cover.

I dislike the Live Anthology as I figure it should've been a band image.

cheerio

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I could have sworn we discussed the issue of sleeves and cover arts, inside and out, somewhere around here before. But I can't seem to find the old thread. No matter.. My take is that despite tons of great photos of this band, and more than a few "markers" throughout the years that there is taste and style on these people's mind more than just occasionally, the number of brilliantly executed album covers and/or artwork is somewhat limited.

 

On ‎2‎/‎3‎/‎2019 at 3:30 AM, RedfordCowboy said:

Not too many album covers stand out as classic to me...(ie. a Dark Side of the Moon, Abbey Road, Led Zeppelin I, Aladdin Sane, What's Going On, Born to Run, London Calling, Insert Your Favorite Here_________) That being said, we know art is subjective, and beauty is in the eye of the beholder. There are several covers that I love that don't make it on any iconic album artwork list.

You, as a designer is probably at least as interested in this as I am. Still I suspect that you may view this backwards... Or at least that there is something you forget here. I think you have to strip the "classic" filter there of the whole era dimension, so to speak, before we start to compare. All the classic sleeves I can think of are from the 60s and 70s. There are a bunch from the 50s and some from the 80s, for sure. Maybe Nirvana and some others make to the list from the 90s... but really.. Almost all the monolith classics were made in an era when media (radio/tv/records) exploded, pop/rock music became huge and all kids was listening, buying, from the same main current... Beatles, Stones, Zeppelin, Floyd, Bowie... There was subcultures, but there was one main THING going on (and yes, it had long hair).

Of course those pioneer big market global pop sensations had the world's leading hip record makers and labels and art departments on their hands, and of course some, if not all had visual artistic ambitions and some truly undying classic stuff was created. Like you say - what we think of when we think of classic album design is almost exclusively from this era (although exceptions exist). Again, the rocking western world was still a lot less fractioned and diverse place, morals, aestethics was slightly more of a shared value, and the audience, again, was largely listening to the same stuff. Quality - to go throught he process of even being allowed to record - was usually enough to be heard over the background noise, shock value or loudest voice or craziest style was not necessary yet. An arty sleeve though, was essential, since back then, before MTV and before cable and streaming and youtube, the sleeve was your ONLY display window, right.

I'd say the difference, then, compared to what happened to the market after the alternative movement of punk and avant garde, and on into the modern era when we are all our own star with a youtube channel (when everybody's talking and nobody listening, so to speak) was quite huge. And while TPATH have their DNA in this older reality, the diversity of the market emerging, soon to explode, was just happening when they started out. They weren't famous enough to have a contemporary  iconic album cover in the 70s when guys like Bowie - or say Kiss - was still at the top of his game of "cool" album covers (although I suppose DDT breakthrough effect came close to creating one, at least by TP fan's standard), and once they became famous enough.. it was no longer fair to expect any record album art to become quite as iconic in the 90s or 00s than all of those you mention. The world - of music and of art - was then a different place. Of course there may have been one or two sleeves popping up, but for the most part the people of the last decade or two don't even buy records, or hold physical format music art in their hands anymore, the way they used to do. Already when LPs was dying (the first time, before the resurrection), when people started to buy CDs, a lot of the album art genre beauty and fascination was lost on people.* They started to listen without the visual concept tied-in.** And soon they started to listen to the compressed shadows of music. And here we are. 

But even if it's unfair, from some angles, then to compare any of Tom's album to St Pepper or Sticky Fingers, since he's operating in another world. I think within his era of production he managed to get some pretty good stuff through the print shop. I'm not crazy about most of TPATH stuff, from a strictly visual angle, but some are great. Other than what I already said about LMU, it could be fun to share some further thought, perhaps:

I like the quality and the design concepts of the "earthy" Wildflowers and Southern Accents. But I think they kinda missed the mark a bit, both with the choice of some of the pictures and certainly - and this is a reoccurring thing with Tom Petty records - the fonts used does not seem quite right to me. (Thought:  SA's visual concept must have been decided on well before the sessions derailed and the album that this cover would be perfect for, never was quite realized, right?  Another thought: the colored slides of the SA inner.. is that a forerunner to the Let Me Up concept, there?)

I like also the dark, slightly mysterious, or even dangerous visual atmosphere of the first five albums. Those are all classic in one way or the other (in the slightly less legendary sense than those albums Redford mentioned.) On the Shelter albums I think they use great photos and concepts, pretty much throughout. Knowing what we know now, the photos from the back of the first one could have been used for front - those are really cool - but back then, up until the tapes was already in the pressing plant, it was a Tom Petty solo record, so it may not be no wonder, it looks like one. On YGGI, the font again: not the best. And the inner sleeve photo (later used for GrH reprints) is a runner up for an ultra cool front sleeve picture. As it turns out that YGGI "Hollies from Hell" sleeve is fantastic. Although perhaps not a classic in a wider sense. DTT are not as dark or mysterious, if shot full of attitude, visually, it's usually the one to win the prize. And for the most part, I don't get that. The color matching of the reds on front is just the beginning.. The inner is really ugly and the whole thing feels off. Still though, Tom's look on the front, the guitar, the pose.. DTT has become kinda iconic , I guess. Hard Promises: While I personally like this cover sleeve a lot - I think it's very different and special in many ways and to me it kinda defines TPATH, just like the sound of The Waiting does - I think most of the inner photos are better, and they could have used something less cluttered and stylish. (The inner photos is awesome, as is the aesthetics from the videos to the album, there are generally tons of good visual stuff from this era.) And worth a mention - for once the font is spot on here! Very good, very fitting. Only.. white.. and not super effective that way. Ironically the UK print HP has stripped cover art too much.. kinda stylish with Tom's face, but nah.. doesn't quite fit the music, makes it feel anemic. The Long After Dark darkroom style, on the other hand, is very effective, I think. Very cool, very much an extension of the music, the way the Shelter era albums were. At least within the Tom Petty crowd universe this should be a classic, if not to the outer world (or other worlds). I do find that guitar to be placed strangely. If you know what a guitar like that weigh, why would he hold it like that. Too far fetched. On the other hand, he looks cool, the red filter and the new "stylized" logo on the inner looks just right, the lines being replicated on the record labels and all.. Not a beauty, but very underrated.

The Lynne albums also fit the music perfectly. FMF strictly balanced visually, yet playful, bright, colourful. With that color scale thing yet again and the inner slightly connected - in my mind - to the Runnin Down A Dream video, and certainly to the playful storybook dimension explored further on ITGWO, with it's stellar constellations and bright blue quality of.. adventure.. What's more: the fonts used on these two albums work great and strengthen the aesthetics. Again, to me ITGWO is really iconic - also in how well it is tied in with some of the singles, the picture disc promo cds' and all,  it's all quite beautiful - but I can see that it's perhaps not quite there for the rest of the world. Too bad.

Greatest Hits. Original one. Great stuff! Awesome feeling in that cover! Too bad with the edited out smokes, though. Stupid, really. I've then seen later prints, and an official sheet music book, that has edited the cigarettes, match and flame back in, which looks even more silly. They should have just kept it to stat with. The slightly psychedelic bend of the picture and colors and the guys.. works just right for what this album is.

She's The One? Some nice shots are available from this era/these sessions, but.. somehow, perhaps not surprisingly, considering this being both a TPATH album and an OST album, the layout of this album does not work for me.. And while the vision is clearly more focused on Echo, I don't think that one flies far either. Again, a rare example of how they use a font to great and simple effect, even extra highlighted with the rather cool little "echo logo" that adorns this release. I like that a lot. But as for the rest of the design, the silver and grayscale and blur, just... seem too easy.. too typical..  It does kinda extend the claustrophobia I get from some of the sounds on the album, but it doesn't do justice to the albums better and more deep moments. All in all, it feels like the work of an art studio intern. (Thought: does the vinyl have the front without title and band name? If so, that may look pretty cool.

I kinda really like The Last DJ design. Seems to me to be one of the more elaborately and really thought-through pieces. I like how they boiled it down to what people in general really think of when they think Tom Petty. That blond long hair. Still they made it something else, by using the b/w, slight sepia on the front. Considering the album musical/lyrical concept it seem extra intentional and interesting that the front is the back of his head, the back is his face.. in color no less! (Another Also on the inside that sequence picture of Tom stumbling through the desert, is really good, effective visual stuff, if very simple at that. I also love the "chart" they prestnt the song titles with on the inner. (Much better than the slightly off-balanced) style and position on the back of the album) I agree with the above post, the more bitter, cynical, side of the LDJ themed songs, the title track, Money Becomes King, Joe kinda stuff, is more represented by the minimalistic art details, and as such perhaps that clashes a bit with the more abstract stuff I just mentioned.Perhaps it's a bit scattered to let both those design aspects loose in the artwork at the same time. If I had to chose one, I'd say what they do with the photos, Tom's return to loong hair, and all that, is the visually most striking to me. But, if they had realized the concept album a bit more, really made it into the mini musical it almost is, then perhaps the miniature "iconography" drawings would have been the stuff to expand on. Perhap just a big old dollar/crown on the front? 

Highway Companion. No Please. One of those rare instances where the LP format doesn't help. It gets even worse in big size. Just ugly and wrong. Perhaps some of the inner sleeve photos could have been used for an alternative idea... don't know how or where this would have needed to go to be great.. The nomad + horse from recent Mudcrutch fame may have worked, come to think of it.

Mojo. Ok, the idea here is retro. Got it. Think Elmore James. And why not. For once the font is both kinda the main attraction and it works. Just wish they would have taken this vintage concept all the way, skipped the line of pictures all together, balanced the thing differently and put the song titles in the front. This case and this type kinda asks for it. Or just let the whole big MOJO title be all of it. There's a seed to greatness and classic styles here, but I think it falls short. The backside MJ pattern thing does not connect, I think and isn't even very good looking, and again, the photo session with the guys.. nah.. while some good stuff were captured for the promo videos, I think these band member pictures look way too much generic and stock photo style 2010 type to fit the artwork here. Visually, the core of the MOJO concept would perhaps have worked even more effectively on a single disc cover (and maybe the album would have been better with 10 songs too...)  but it is what it is and has to be a fold out.   

With Hypnotic Eye, again, I don't particularly like the font they used and there is something slightly off balance to me with the title and band name. I do like the front concept, though, and how it ties in with the back, and even the spine of the record. I don't think it's was called for to make this a gatefold, however, since it would have been much more effective with an old school slimmed single disc cover spine. But that's me. Kudos for daring the slightly "hypnotic" image and for putting the song titles on the cover. Finally! 

Mudcrutch? Yeah, why not. I could have some! Faceless hipsters, flamboyant nomads and dancing bears? Finally we've reached the land of plenty! Apart from the totally pointless back sleeve of "2", I'm a big fan of the Mudcrutch design concept. The band logo is part of the allure, of course. Those things can come a long way. But there is also a certain finesse to the art concepts, a playfulness that evokes quality as much as we don't give that much of a damn. Very fun and very fitting to their sound and approach. To exapand on this a bit further... Tom always had that sense of humor and special wit. It does sneak up occasionally in the visual design. Not only in the DTT fake nose picture that are so incredibly ugly, or in certain smirks here and there, but on a much more grand scale it also shows and are allowed room in the fine details of some of the art work that adorn his catalogue over the years, not least the singles., Very much of this on the FMF and  ITGWO art discussed - they are soaked in the "TP" experience which of course in itself is an unique quality of strength in this context. Of course, there are hints of it within the frames of Traveling Wilburys and Mudcrutch and in many of his videos. I'm talking about a much more personal and special style or angle, that impregnates the whole experience and feels genuinely "TP", a way the average advertisement design studio's work with stock photos can ever accomplish. (Kiss My Amps may seem like easy or even sloppy work, at first glance, but for what they are I think their covers does put the message across perfectly. I find them to be nice images, well balanced in every way and well in tune with the music - and title.)

Somewhere there is the defining line between the good and bad album covers. They need to feel "connected" for real as well as being nice to look at. The artist/studio need to be "in on the vibe", so to speak. To me it takes a true artist to accomplish this and to communicate it - with or without minor flaws - as with the full ITGWO concept or the multi layered design of LDJ, or even the basic visual themes of the Shelter albums or the simple silliness of Mudcrutch (although, I still don't get why they forgot about that back side and why they made it red??) Albums like Wildflowers and Southern Accents feel like serious attempts to think bigger, all very personal and genuine in the craft. It takes vision and skill. On the other hand, it takes anyone with a good heart for the band, with the minimum of basic design training and a camera, to aim high and end up with Echo, Mojo... or DTT on a lucky day. It takes even less, I guess to come up with decent if quite pointless and posing attempts like LMU (although strike of genius with the airplane in the swimming pool, must say), Pack Up The Plantation or Live Anthology. It takes a nut to come up with Highway Companion.

Let's just say that kinda makes full circle with my initial remarks here. Back when A Hard Day's Night was made, there was professionals dealing with these things. They didn't always produce classic - as always that is an interplay between said art, a great record, good timing and fate. But they were, again, professionals at dealing with the many levels that were suppose to be communicated through a good record sleeve. These days, much as is the case with making the music or "consuming" it, anyone with a cell phone can be their own art director now. And that is not criticism of any of Redford's positively great attempts or any other's I've seen around the fan art sphere over the years. You guys are great! I'm just saying, that from a recording artist's point of view it may be more difficult to day to find someone you can trust to achieve a good, sturdy and genuine work with the sense for what you are working with and what you are about. You need to find one that is not only skilled technically, but one with the right type of vision, the right type of soul. This was always hard, but I dare say.. in this case too.. the marked has exploded. Unlike the early 60s, when you where happy record, and have a deal and do exactly what the label told you, these days the possibilities and chances are endless, but how to navigate? How to find the right thing. There're obviously pros and cons to both the old "monorural" order and to our mega-multi-resolution era. In fact you might wanna work a lot harder today with this aspect to get exactly what you want, unless you are just fine by doing it yourself, of course. If you find art important enough, but don't have the time to map out the jungle or to work on it yourself, you will end up with just good enough (pun), which may indeed be good enough, but perhaps not the stuff for the record sleeve classics hall of fame. All this as a sidenote. Just saying.. that even from this angle, the production, just as is the case with the audience finding its way to the result - the last decade or so has become a much different world. 

Alright, to sum all these ramblings up some... My personal favourite, visually, is probably ITGWO, at the end of the day... and also, despite the fonts YGGI and SA.. and maybe Last DJ. Also Mudcrutch and Kiss My Amps get honorary mention for beauty in simplicity. But in terms of cover sleeves being iconic in the sense that it evokes feelings in the minds of people not normally tuned into Tom Petty.. what has set Tom down in the history of record sleeves, I'd say that the ones that reaches farthest would be DTT and Gr Hits. Perhaps also FMF and Wildflowers.. but who knows. All I can say, that it's not fair. There are some misses for sure, but also some really underrated stuff, in terms of design.

Please, go ahead commenting on how long this post is. Very original!

 

-----

*Even if some, for exemple Pet Shop Boys, tried to go all Andy Warhol on the CD format as well.. with their Lego style jewel case. Others doing various longbox formats to try to save the form... fold out posters, books, some vinyl replicas on the CD disc surface or even the sleeve (poplar in Japan) and so on..

**Unless there was a video - which usually was the case at first. A video, that for all intent or purpose drowned the music in visual impressions. An art form in itself, of course. And one at which Tom Petty paradoxically enough - considering his artistic DNA and the "video killed the radio star" logic - truly excelled.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ha ha ha shelter, I'd say stand by for questions about "could you post an image of the details you mentioned". 

1stly: oh yeah, debut album's back (the tattoo heart logo) would've been great on the front! But I say that from now, looking back, because they used that logo all the way down the years & it's so cool. Arguably it's a sensible decision to use front of first album for photo of singer or band & to name album for the singer/band. Neat & compact packet of info for new fans -> less to remember when they went down to local record shop. 1977 Customer: "New band I heard about on college radio? Tom Petty?" Shop: "Ah yes, here it is, in punk section."

2ndly: What's this collector info you mention about Hard Promises cover being different in UK? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oops did I misremember when I sent message (posted above)? I was thinking front of Debut = TP's smirking face with logo above it. Back of debut = black background with tattoo heart logo (like t-shirts). Inner sleeve of debut = 5 head & shoulder images, one of each guy (some with facial hair!)

  • So what I meant was, this could've been equally cool back in 1976: a debut album's front cover that's a black background & colourful tattoo heart logo. However, I applaud anyone who uses musician's photo on any debut as this helps create & establish singer's profile.  

Raises question- does an album's iconic cover lend some magic to the songs inside? Or does a great bunch of songs create an iconic album & so we then retrospectively think of everything about that album as iconic (including the cover)? Spinal Tap's Smell The Glove (could it be any blacker?). I love Wildflowers - iconic, no question about it - but (whispering quietly) not everythingeabout its cover hints of how marvellous it is. One big image is what I prefer, but realise graphic designers of the world of album covers a) don't know what I think & b) don't care.  (Immediately scurrying away before I get a tomato in the face from outraged riot.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Big Blue Sky said:

Or does a great bunch of songs create an iconic album & so we then retrospectively think of everything about that album as iconic (including the cover)

Sometimes but I like Damn the Torpedoes and Long After Dark and no way does the quality of the songs improve or make those into classic album covers. TPATH are rightly not known for having good and memorable album covers. There's exceptions and we all may differ on them but while the band came out with some really good pop-rock tunes and phenomenal singles  like the Waiting, they didn't do so well with the record covers.

cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...