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I think this is considered the weakest TPATH album. I think people dislike this more than Southern Accents. I could be wrong. But it's definitely their strangest all around record. 

01---Jamming Me. It's a good song. Good riff, nice rhythm, I like the line "...let your tv bleed." The weakest bit is the references to Vanessa Redgrave and Joe Piscopo and Eddie Murphy. Leaving aside if it's a good idea or not to call someone out in a song like this, I wonder why Tom doesn't change those to more modern people, or some folks from ancient history. It's a shame this was left off the original Greatest Hits.

 

02----Runaway Trains. For all the talk of Jeff Lynne's production, whatever they did to this is terrible. There's a good song under all the synthetic production. I go back and forth on this one, I think with something like Wildflowers production and a bit shorter length, I'd enjoy this more.

 

03---The Damage You've Done. This is an all right rock song. The live version on the much circulated bootleg from South Carolina is a pretty good version. It's a slinky rock song, feels like something you'd hear at the corner bar. Again, I think a more grounded production would make this more enjoyable, this needs grit, Stan's drums should be punishing, but they sound a bit muted. Still, I like it.

 

04---It'll All Work Out. A good experiment. It's a sad song I have to be in the mood for, but I like it. Kind of like the sad version of Alright For Now. The lack of percussion aside from the tambourine (?) is an interesting approach. It suits the song; the outro is pretty, too.

 

05----My Life/Your World. Am I the only one who wants to hear more of that intro? I love the first thirty seconds of this one. That's just such a neat instrumental. Too bad they never worked it into the live set or the middle of a jam or something. I like the groove on this song. The opening lyrics are a bit too sad for me, though. I feel like this is another weird one, there's quite the distance between something like Listen to Her Heart and this. Once again, I think the 80s feel of the production inhibits the song. I like this one though, a weird grooving song. Benmont does some really nice playing that goes against the grain of the song, leading to yet another wonderfully tasteful solo by Mr. Campbell.

 

06---Think About Me. I really like this one. It's rollicking. Another really good bridge. Benmont's playing is subtle and well done. Much like the Damage You've Done, It feels like a good bar song. 

 

07---All Mixed Up. Man! Another intro I really love. I could've listened to that for a good two minutes, would've been a neat song! Anyway, this is a very sweet song. Just sugary good. I like it, and I think it's a place where the 80s production works. I think, sitting here in the middle of this album, it inadvertently describes the record it resides on. I don't know what he's singing about with the line about "last picture show" but I like it. Same with the whoo-oohs at the end. They work quite nicely here. 

 

08----A Self-Made Man. This reminds me of Spike mainly because of what Tom does with his voice and there seems to be some similarity musically. I like it, but as with much of this album, ti's not something I want to listen to very often. I guess this, much like some of the other songs has that solid midtempo groove. The verses are interesting and transition nicely into an interesting almost upbeat chorus all while the rhythm stays locked in. Nice solo, too. I like this one more than I thought.

 

09---Ain't Love Strange. Very good intro on this one. The barbwire line is good. Great bridge! This is a good song, feels likes a hit single that should've been. Such good playing by Benmont on the bridge.  

 

10----How Many More Days. Another midtempo rock song. Maybe in a way, Tom was "getting this style out of his system." Going forward for a while, the songs would be either uptempo or a different version of the heavy groove song, like the majority of tracks on Wildflowers or She's the One. I really like what Benmont does at those notes from around 1:11 to 1:18, so sweet! And Mike's playing around 1:50, those riffs are great! I like the abrupt ending and Benmont's quick little flourish.

 

11---Let Me Up----I think it's a really good rock song and it's a shame it's never been played live. It feels to me, like the last gasp hurrah of the band before the changes in the 90s. It's both beaten down and defiant, with some really interesting playing during the chorus. A pretty good song they should premiere at a residency!

 

Overall, and I realize I'm writing this with the benefit of hindsight but the record feels like a musical cul de sac, the band enjoying themselves ( I hope anyway) but with a sense of where do we go from here? Well, maybe Tom felt that way, who knows? Regardless, while Full Moon Fever was a new beginning, this does indeed feel like the end of an era. But really, I think that's knowing their history coloring my perception here. That said, it still holds true. The band wasn't the same after Full Moon Fever and never would be again.

Do some people love this album? I think the songs work, to a degree, individually, but all together, I think the midtempo rock blurs a bit with the other songs; nothing really takes off the way Jamming Me does, except for Let Me Up. But they're still good songs. The production is its worst on Runaway Trains but overall isn't that great on this record. 

I haven't listened to this in years and it was better than I recalled but for some reason, just not something I want to hear very much. However, I do think it's better, song by song, than some of their other albums. For me, I'd probably condense it to an ep that I enjoy, as I do with most of TPATH's albums.

It just occurred to me, but this whole album feels Nightwatchmanesque. It rocks but in a slightly askew way.

Oh yeah, I forgot to mention the album cover. It's an interesting idea and fits the music, the composite face, but at the same time, the garish colors and the finished face aren't exactly pleasant to look at; again, an interesting experiment but is it good? Kinda feels like the album to some degree.

What does everyone else think? It really does feel like a forgotten album, though it is really interesting to listen to.

 

cheers

Edited by MaryJanes2ndLastDance

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Maybe the deepest insights into this album I've read so far. Maybe I should look up the chapter in Conversations again.

Mostly, I agree with you. The only difference being Runaway Trains (and maybe Ain't Love Strange, that's a song I could do without). For some reason I think the production suits the song quite well. True, it's a synth-heavy track smelling of eighties drum machines. But at the same time, it's exactly this arrangement that lends the song an attitude somewehre between elegant, cool detachment and empathetic involvement. I remember reading (in Conversations?) that there were basically two different strands of production on Let Me Up: Tom's rather loose, spontaneously arranged numbers, recorded in an approach inspired by the previous Dylan tour, and Mike's more produced tracks (hence the patchwork quality of the material). Runaway Trains definitely is one of the latter. To me, it's very similar to Don Henley's Boys of Summer (that Tom interestingly passed on as being too techno and for which he suggested Mike and Don change the first chord of the chorus to a major). I've always liked that one, despite never having been much of an eighties fan, so maybe that's why I like Runaway Trains.

The eighties production works on other songs as well, as you mentioned; although Self Made Man sounded much less eighties than what I remembered wenn I listened to it the other day.

And as you say, it becomes obvious on this album, especially in hindsight, why Tom was open for new impulses and willing to go into new directions with Jeff Lynne et al. The only thing he said about it in RDAD documentary was: "Let Me Up (I've Had Enough)"? Speaks for itself!" I think the Heartbreakers were a dead end street to him at that point, or even a few yards further, and with Let Me Up they had crashed into a wall. So he was eager to pick up the pieces he liked about his own Music, infect them with influences from new friends and put them together in a new framework.

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"Let Me Up (I've Had Enough)"? Speaks for itself!" I think the Heartbreakers were a dead end street to him at that point, or even a few yards further, and with Let Me Up they had crashed into a wall. So he was eager to pick up the pieces he liked about his own Music, infect them with influences from new friends and put them together in a new framework.

 Thanks.

Interesting points. Looking back, despite Stan's departure, it's good that Tom went in a new upbeat direction for Full Moon Fever. Again, he's too harsh on this album, as he's been on Echo, the difference being his memories at the time of recording Echo vs. his, I'm presuming, low opinion of Let Me Up. 

Still, I think pulling out some songs from this neglected album, especially the title track, would be fun at a residency. 

I understand what you're saying about the production on Runaway Trains, "cool detachment" vs. "empathic involvement." It makes sense, I just don't like it. There's a live version somewhere out there of Runaway Trains that works a lot better than the album version for me. 

I wonder why Jammin' Me was left off Greatest Hits. Maybe because of the celebrity "cameos"? I could see why he wouldn't want to draw attention to that, but...he performed the song way after its release. There was room on there for it. And if anyone at the time mentioned those lines, he could've just said they were Bob's.

The song would've fit right between Don't Come Around Here No More and I Won't Back Down. 

But back to the album. Yeah, I recall reading that in Conversations about the two different styles. It's pretty amazing when Tom would do that, I think on Wildflowers (the song) and Swingin'.

Let Me Up got short shrift in Conversations too.

I figure if anyone loves the album or really appreciates some of the songs, they would be on here...

cheers

 

 

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I think the case can, and perhaps should be made that LMU(IHE) indeed is a somewhat overlooked, underrated album. It's pretty far from my favorites, but as is the case with some of the other "lesser favorites" we've discussed, it's not as easy as bad or good. It rather depends on what angle you take, and for me LMU have some promsing song Writing that doesn't normally get the credit deserved. The key word might be "potential".

To me there is a general problem of the LMU album being more dated than the average TP record. Not to say the most dated of all TP albums. While Southern accents went over board with the "contemporary experiments" (in the context of TP recording history that is) on a some tracks, and while the Lynne era carried all the 1990:ish Jeff:iness, for better or worse, LMU doesn't go anywhere fast. That is, I find the sound to be largely.. flat(?), shiny(?) and boring(!), not to say a bit dead in a quite typical 1987 fashion. To make matters worse, the mix is far from optimal in terms of how the vocals was treated and where they ended up. It's supposed to sound contemporary and mature, I'm sure - a Here's a rock band coming of age with style, sort of thing - but to me it sound less that than anything else they recorded in the 80s up til that point. Even 1981's Hard Promises, from when they were practically still youngsters, sounds a lot more thought through and multi dimensional. Not to mention timeless - the least and last of all things that can be said about LMU.*

As for the material, this is where things start to happen to this album as I see it. Or could start to happen. On the face of it, a few truly great compositions anchors this records: Jammin Me, Runaway Trains, It'll All Work Out and the title track (right - that is one forgotten gem!) are all absolutely great. Runaway Trains and the title tracks stands out as the mistreated classics here, as I see it. Then at least two, somwhat leighter weight but fairly solid tracks: The Damage You've Done, How Many More Days. All of these decent enough to ensure a really great album, had the sound and aesthetics been elsewhere.

As for the rest of the tracks - well, here's the catch - I don't find one really bad song in the lot but I don't really find a really good single hit either and not more than three or four really great songs. But I do find plenty of potential. Much like Southern Accents, but from largely other reasons, LMU feels like the album that could have been. Cause, to me both the lesser of the ones mentioned and the tracks I haven't listed suffer from some kind of.. sketchy:ness.. there is something missing in the way they are composed. Tracks like My Life/Your World, A Self-Made Man and All Mixed Up don't even feel finished to me. A decent idea for an intro here, an ok verse or a nice bridge there.. but something seems to be missing to make those really good songs. (Especially absurd I find it that All Mixed Up was the advance single in the CD format. If I knew this band and had that land on my desk in 1987, I would surely have lost faith for the time being.) This vagueness in a lot of the material combined with the dated vagueness in sound makes for a less than optimal album experience as I see it. It is what it is, but the least they can do is to revive some of it's best moments in a live setting. At least three or four of these songs would have a glorious second life dressed in the much more fitting sound and attitude of the contemporary TP&TH, I'm quite sure.

Finally - In the thread about Let Me Up (the song) MJ2LD wrote about "hearing Jamming Me and expecting a really good rock album and the second song is Runaway Trains!" implying disappointment. As far as the argument is that Jammin Me promises something that the rest of the disc don't deliver, I can perhaps agree slightly, but it's not what I'd call a deal breaker. Besides, speaking of disappointments.. To me Runaway Trains is among the most underrated songs in all of the TP cataloge. Sure, the sound, as much of this album, leaves a lot to be desired, but the song.. the song is an awesome piece of writing and one of the most mature and finished tracks of the bunch. Oh how such a song would have swung had it been cut during Mojo sessions or performed live in the 2000s! It's so disappointing that they never revisit songs like that, giving them a second chance to proove greatness. 

 

---

*In the light of this, the most amazing thing of all is that something that sounds like Full Moon Fever could be reached by largely the same bunch of people within two years! I am stunned every time I realize how little time elapsed between LMU and the Wilburys/Fever era. Seriously - just think about it. As much as most things are floating, this definately is where some kind of line has to be drawn in terms of TP creative eras. Whatever the touring with Dylan may have done, whatever Harrison may have told him, whatever Lynne may have showed him, TP seemed to have reached another level all of a sudden, suddenly becoming the mature heavy weight classic rock star he had the ambition to become through most of the 80s. I can hear the trace of this vision lingering extra clear in the one song that perhaps comes closes to showcase what the LMU album could've sounded like if we'd been more lucky - in Love Is A Long Road - to me it feels like a brilliant left over of sorts. But apart from that Jeff Lynne really tore TP's own type of 80s sonic confusion up most effectively and the break/development couldn't be more evident. It's an abyss, and quite dismal at that. At least that I feel prepared to thank Jeff a lot for.

 

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As for the rest of the tracks - well, here's the catch - I don't find one really bad song in the lot but I don't really find a really good single hit either and not more than three or four really great songs. But I do find plenty of potential. Much like Southern Accents, but from largely other reasons, LMU feels like the album that could have been. Cause, to me both the lesser of the ones mentioned and the tracks I haven't listed suffer from some kind of.. sketchy:ness.. there is something missing in the way they are composed. Tracks like My Life/Your World, A Self-Made Man and All Mixed Up don't even feel finished to me. A decent idea for an intro here, an ok verse or a nice bridge there.. but something seems to be missing to make those really good songs.

  I suppose the sketchy feeling is from Tom's spontaneous approach with the material. However, I still like the tracks you mention, they feel finished to me, though I get where you're coming from.

 Yes, there's nothing that I really dislike, in fact, I was surprised at how much I liked the songs on here and yet at the same time, I still don't have much of a desire to listen to this. It's odd. 

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Finally - In the thread about Let Me Up (the song) MJ2LD wrote about "hearing Jamming Me and expecting a really good rock album and the second song is Runaway Trains!" implying disappointment. As far as the argument is that Jammin Me promises something that the rest of the disc don't deliver, I can perhaps agree slightly, but it's not what I'd call a deal breaker.

 Disappointment, yes! While not as great as with my initial listen years ago, I'm still disappointed with that transition even though I know it's coming. For my taste, The Damage You've Done would work nicely here, then you get Runaway Trains, less of a complete and sudden driving into a brick wall, more easing into it. Heck, Runaway  Trains could work as a centerpiece in the album, as it's written but with the terrible production scoured off it.

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 Oh how such a song would have swung had it been cut during Mojo sessions or performed live in the 2000s! It's so disappointing that they never revisit songs like that, giving them a second chance to proove greatness. 

 

That's a really good idea! I think the song would've worked nicely on that album and would've been a real gem.

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*In the light of this, the most amazing thing of all is that something that sounds like Full Moon Fever could be reached by largely the same bunch of people within two years! I am stunned every time I realize how little time elapsed between LMU and the Wilburys/Fever era. Seriously - just think about it. As much as most things are floating, this definately is where some kind of line has to be drawn in terms of TP creative eras. 

Good point! That is an amazing progression. And I think it's what adds to the neglect, disregard, avoidance of Let Me Up. In some article I read, around that tour they had to throw a curtain over some areas of arenas because of the empty seats. I think, as with a lot of TPATH's work, if I'm in a certain mood this record works for me. And who knows? Maybe one day someone in the band will suggest a song off here, maybe even the title one. They did play When The Time Comes, after all...!

cheers

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In some article I read, around that tour they had to throw a curtain over some areas of arenas because of the empty seats.

 

To that I would just like to add that the people who decided against going to a 1987 show on the back of their experience with the album, really pulled a blank. Suckers. The shows from around then were business as usual, rocking good and lightyears ahead of the somewhat clinical album vibe.

Still, those were the days, hu? Days when a set could actually change enough from tour to tour, for people to be cautious as of what to expect. Moreover, days when a new albums worth's of material actually was expected to have a great impact on what was likely to happen on stage. Enter Full Moon Fever and soon those days were no more. Soon all the ingredients and the go to formula was arrived at. LMU material were not to be part of that and neither were much else.

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LMU is the band's most underrated album. Period. While Long After Dark may get that note for some, I'd disagree with that point because although it may be obscure to the public, it is a favorite among most TPATH fans. This album, like Southern Accents reeks of the 80s. However, in this sense, it's great for it. There is something to be said for a piece of art that gets dated the further down the road you get. Sure, timeless is something you want to strive for as an artist so your work can connect to people throughout the ages, but there have been many great artists, especially in music, who have made an album that was modern at the time but has become dated within a few years. Bob Dylan, Neil Young, George Harrison, Paul McCartney, etc. have all made albums in the 80s that have that 80s sound all over them.

I think this album is great because it breaks away from the formula. If you think Southern Accents is way off you typical TPATH formula (which it is), LMU is even more off the cuff and different then it's predecessor. Coming off of their tour with Bob, they made an album that is full of energy and chaos, two things they picked up from touring with Bob. Hell, the album even shows that Tom and MIke can produce an album on their own, unsupervised and I think because of this, because this was their first album without an outside producer like Cordell or Iovine, you get to see and experience the sounds they were feeling. As someone said earlier, Runaway Trains sounds damn near similar to Boys of Summer production wise. Both written and produced by Mike. That shows you a lot in what Mike's growing production style is like. Overall, though this album sounds dated, the album is chaos compared to just about every other TPATh album. And although Southern Accents is chaos too, the difference here is this sounds like an album made by the cohesive band we know TPATH can be while Southern Accents sounds like the band isn't there as a whole.

I'll give a more in depth post on each song later and why I think the album works as a whole and is under appreciated but I just wanted to kind of post my thesis and see what the likes of Shelter have to say :)

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I'm just glad that Jeff Lynne didn't produce LMUIHE! :D

LMUIHE is a very important album in the canon of this bands work. With the benefit of hindsight now in 2015, the album is a staging post, a line in the sand, a sign post to highlight that things were never going to be the same again afterwards. It should also be remembered that it is a dam fine album in my view, and I'm on record as defending this album and have the bruises to prove it!

I would whole heartedly agree with everything that martin03345 has written in the first paragraph and first three sentences of the second paragraph of his post. I have always found TPATHB albums without an external producer as less than the sum of their parts though. My strong view is that every album should have an external producer, and when TPATHB have worked with external producers then the albums have been better realised than self produced efforts. That's not to say that this first Tom & Mike produced effort is not without it's merits...in fact it's very interesting to listen to the album on the basis that it is their first production effort...it's another angle to look at things. Yes, no matter who produced it, it would retain ''it was acceptable in the 80's it was acceptable at the time'' type production sound...but i'm sticking to my guns that an external producer would have made the production sound less patchy on this album.

The songs are very good. I would however have ditched Think About Me, All Mixed Up and Ain't Love Strange...those three songs don't cut the mustard for me on the album, but the others are either ready made gems or gems in disguise that need a bit of extra chiseling to reach their full potential...(did I mention an external producer.......)

The live version of Runaway Trains puts the album version to shame, but only because the live version was so good rather than the album version being so bad....i loved the album version but the live version blew it out of the water. 

Jammin Me, dated lyrics or not was the live show opener as far forward as 1999 and despite the dated lyrics rocked and grooved away to good effect. 

Damage You've Done, It'll All Work Out, My Life Your World..3 great tracks that round out a very strong first half of the album. Things nose dive somewhat on the next 3 songs as i mentioned. I love the bad ass non conformity of A Self Made Man, I get the impression that this guy could be a stobborn as a mule, narrow minded good for nothing or else a rebel with a just cause who won't back down..either way I like him!

Ain't love strange....maybe trying too hard to be a pop song but has enough going for it to keep you rooting for the song if not fully satisfied that it delivers on it's potential...oh wonder what an external producer could have done to help the song...but still Tom & Mike learning the production game...we all have to start somewhere....it's not bad.

How many more days....definitely a rough diamond that could do with some polishing to fully realise it's potential...i like it a lot, want to love it but there's something missing..maybe that's a bit harsh actually...but still. 

Let me up......A metaphor for Stan's last defiant stand as a rock n roll drummer before looking miserable on Take The Highway tour video trying to play in what he termed a Full Moon Fever ''cover band''. Things were never going to be the same again after this Let Me Up album. Jeff gave Tom a shot in the arm, a new way of doing things on FMF. Could the band have gone on the way they were? Probably not, evolution, new directions to stay alive were necessary, so while Full Moon Fever and ITGWO were not to my taste at all as albums because of the sterile production (the live concert versions from these album tracks were much superior to what was delivered on the Lynne produced albums in my view) they were a stepping stone to Wildflowers, Echo, She's The One soundtrack and a return to album form with Rick Rubin not seen since Long After Dark for me.

After LMUIHE album 1987 wasn't ''the day the music died'' but 1989 was certainly when TPATHB music and dynamic changed and american pie started to taste different. :) Thankfully both TPATHB and Don McClean are still with us making great music!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by dollardime

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As for the material, this is where things start to happen to this album as I see it. Or could start to happen. On the face of it, a few truly great compositions anchors this records: Jammin Me, Runaway Trains, It'll All Work Out and the title track (right - that is one forgotten gem!) are all absolutely great. Runaway Trains and the title tracks stands out as the mistreated classics here, as I see it. Then at least two, somwhat leighter weight but fairly solid tracks: The Damage You've Done, How Many More Days. All of these decent enough to ensure a really great album, had the sound and aesthetics been elsewhere.

As for the rest of the tracks - well, here's the catch - I don't find one really bad song in the lot but I don't really find a really good single hit either and not more than three or four really great songs. But I do find plenty of potential. Much like Southern Accents, but from largely other reasons, LMU feels like the album that could have been. Cause, to me both the lesser of the ones mentioned and the tracks I haven't listed suffer from some kind of.. sketchy:ness.. there is something missing in the way they are composed. Tracks like My Life/Your World, A Self-Made Man and All Mixed Up don't even feel finished to me.

 

Yes, you're right here, I think. Although Self-Made Man sounds like a great studio take to me. And I do think it's a great composition, everything is in place; Tom wrote it for Johnny Cash (who couldn't come to terms with the chorus, if I remember correctly). Let Me Up (the song) never worked for me, I don't think it has the same kind of quality songwriting-wise. But that's just me.

In general it's really the lack of substantial songwriting from which the album suffers the most.

To me the really good tracks are: Jammin' Me, Runaway Trains, It'll All Work Out, and Self-Made Man.

O.k. ones: All Mixed Up, How Many More Days, Think About Me, My Life/Your World.

Could do without: The Damage You've Done, Ain't Love Strange, Let Me Up.

So not even half of the album is really great, which makes it not one I listen to often. Having said that, I was pleasantly surprised when I listened to it recently. Because the good ones I really liked a lot and the not-so-good ones and even the worst ones were not as bad as I had remembered them.

I agree, I think this album would be worthwhile revisiting in concert. At least in parts.

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That Tom wrote Self Made Man for Johnny Cash is very interesting, I didn't know that. Thanks for sharing that little nugget of wisdom TwoGunSlingers.

Would love to have heard Johnny sing it. I can also see why he didn't beacuse of the chorus. It's hard to imagine Johnny Cash being afraid of anything least of all being afraid of love ''it scares me baby, does it scare you too''. Dam, even if Johnny changed those two lines, It was made for him. I'm sure Tom wouldn't have minded if he did change those two lines. 

I can really see Johnny singing this song to great effect. Pity it didn't happen...could have been done when The Heartbreakers backed up Johnny on that American Recordings album they did with Rubin. Maybe an opportunity missed there. Tom is on record as saying that the Heartbreakers best album is actually the one recorded with Johnny Cash in terms of their playing. 

Yet another angle on LMUIHE album that adds to it's allure and hidden charms. I told y'all it's a good album! ;)

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@martin:

I'm glad you named it "thesis". :) As such I very much like it. And I do apreciate that "chaos" angle. I also recognize all those sorely dated, yet splendid and/or fascinating albums, of which the 80s especially - but let's not forget the 90s shall we - were so rich. Sometimes albums are great not despite being dated, but almost because. I love many of them. Generally though, at least it takes some recognition and hit value in an album's own right, in it's own time, before the whole reason for it being disregarded now is sweeped under the argument of it being our times not understanding what it was and all that.. Not always a dated album was hailed even in it's own time, is my point. Just as sometimes an album that were misunderstood simply because it was out of sync with it's own time, can later be hailed as a true and inovative classic. LMU wasn't that big of a hit then, and it isn't now, so.. Nuff of that.. just a side note really..

Thus far I'm all for your thesis. And that's why I do admit LMU(IHE) is underrated. But it's also why I did chose the word "potential". Cause to me - as true as it is that this album carries the vibe of band and dynamics to a considerable degree - something I am usually a fan of - and while it's true that it's nothing wrong with sounding like 1987 if you happen to be from 1987, and while furhtermore true that some songs are really great on paper yet a few carries great promise - it kinda stops there. In theory.

Cause, in reality, this particular 1987 vibe - if ever so cool in theory, as such in fact even cooler than most things in 1987 - does still not sit quite right with me (and I'm not sure it sat more than moderately right even with 1987 itself, if years had a say in retrospect, and if we should even listen to what a bastard of a year like 1987 has to say...). The aim and method may be ok, but it falls flat on my ears. The sound being state of the art or very modern even then is not what drives the album's charm if you ask me. But it may still be ok, sure why not. The arrangements as such, the "chaos" aspect and all that may be good enough - I am prepared to say all that is great. But if so, it's still butchered by the mix and the resulting sound still doesn't impress me, as it didn't seem to have impressed 1987 that much. 

Still, it is when this is combined with the level or style of much of the material, I guess, that the final nail is really in for me. The total of it just fails all it's great promise. I like the concept, just as I like your thesis - I just don't like the resulting album that much. I really want to, because of some of what you say and some of the songs. But it just sounds so much better when you say it, than it does on record. 

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Cause, in reality, this particular 1987 vibe -

This "vibe" ruined Runaway Trains. There's a  good song struggling to be heard under all the f/x. Had it been recorded on Wildflowers, or as you suggested, Mojo, I think it would be a much loved classic, at least by people who read this forum. 

That and Let Me Up would be great at a residency. Runaway Trains could have that extended moody jam like Shadow People or Tweeter & the Monkey Man, while Let Me Up could have its ending stretched out.

cheers

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Speaking of what the likes of Shelter has to say..

I gave my piece. But perhaps I should also add, that apart from the unusually boring example of '87 sound (being it the mix or whatever else) and the bunch of songs that don't feel quite ready to me - there is also an aspect of TP vocals that drags this album down from what could have been half grand. The singing at times seems.. squeezed, shall I say.. forced.. or even whiny.. and at the same time with a bit of singing while chewing tobacco feel to it, which add a certain slapstick vibe to the whole thing. Perhaps that is just me. I've been searching my soul to find the itchy spot, but it struck me today that that's what it is, and it doesn't help this album's well farings in my record collection, I'm afraid. (I know I once mentioned how I feel Echo suffers from a few off-key notes from TP, adding to the misery one could argue, for better or worse, but here it's not about key, it's just a.. strung.. quality that I don't particularly fancy.)

 

Runaway Trains could have that extended moody jam like Shadow People or Tweeter & the Monkey Man, while Let Me Up could have its ending stretched out.

 

You don't say? :) As you may know, I'm generally not a jam man myself. I prefer short, sweet and intense, if I get to choose. But I do try to strech out the endings of my posts at times, which perhaps is to your benefit then, and is something that perhaps you can tell from this totally erratic subordinate clause, for example, or this whole second part of my post if you like................  

 

 

Edited by Shelter

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You don't say? :) As you may know, I'm generally not a jam man myself. I prefer short, sweet and intense, if I get to choose. But I do try to strech out the endings of my posts at times, which perhaps is to your benefit then, and is something that perhaps you can tell from this totally erratic subordinate clause, for example, or this whole second part of my post if you like................  

Enough of the same old same old erratic subordinate clause; I think it's way past time you brought back the unattached participle clause...perhaps when you post a residency?

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 As you may know, I'm generally not a jam man myself. I prefer short, sweet and intense, if I get to choose. 

Do you enjoy moments like It's Good To Be King? Or the long Saving Grace? I think for the most part, TPATH do a good job between stretching songs out, reworking songs (acoustic Kings Highway or I Won't Back Down, etc.) and playing them pretty much as is, like with Free Fallin'.

Too many extended songs become a slog, not enough and I could just stay home and listen to the album.

cheers

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Let me up......A metaphor for Stan's last defiant stand as a rock n roll drummer before looking miserable on Take The Highway tour video trying to play in what he termed a Full Moon Fever ''cover band''. Things were never going to be the same again after this Let Me Up album. 

  I think it could've worked if Stan had stayed in the band. There's nothing that Tom wrote that he couldn't have handled. I understand the reasons given for his departure/firing. I just think it would've been interesting had he remained, to have that many original members with the band all these years.

cheers

 

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Enough of the same old same old erratic subordinate clause; I think it's way past time you brought back the unattached participle clause...perhaps when you post a residency?

:D Good thinking! I've been pondering the possibility of writing a residency of more rare arguments at some point. Something to tickle the minds of the passionate and hoist my own spirit and legacy with one stone. It's getting so tedious beating the same old nag every day. I deserve better and so do you. So, I'm working on a masterplan of genius, believe me. I'm gonna let it all hang out. I just haven't decided on which deep thoughts to share, or what section in which to post yet... I know they keep telling me that thinking is best done in the one way and yada yada, that one dimension is all people ask for and can handle, but I know those voices are just part of the evil scheme, trying to brain wash me into stop thinking and start writing in line. So stay tuned.. I've been rehearsing a whole lot of long lost thoughts for my upcoming posts........ 

 

Do you enjoy moments like It's Good To Be King? Or the long Saving Grace? I think for the most part, TPATH do a good job between stretching songs out, reworking songs (acoustic Kings Highway or I Won't Back Down, etc.) and playing them pretty much as is, like with Free Fallin'.

Too many extended songs become a slog, not enough and I could just stay home and listen to the album.

cheers

 

Yes. That is exactly it. Just that.. you seemingly suggest or encourage the "stretching out" as an almost universal remedy in your posts (I might be mistaken here, but hence my comment), while I think it's a tonic better served with severe caution for any band that are not Grateful Dead. But, oh yes, I love reworkings of songs - to do something with a song in the live setting is the whole point in performing it as I see it. Trying to duplicate the record is utter folly. But stretching things out, jamming extensively and what have you, is far from the only way to "do something", imo. But sure, I can appreciate a certain inspired looong It's Good To Be King here, a Chrystal River there.. Certainly. I don't particularly like to know if, when and how it's gonna happen though. As always, I think scripts are for rock'n'roll sceptics.. and to to script the unscripted.. well.. let's not go there. In short, there's no need to extend the same songs every night, or to extend a certain number of songs each night.. Besides, usually one thorough jam session per show is more than enough, and more than two is too much, in the same way a genuine 25 songs sets are better than over baked 15 songs set. Rule of thumb as far as jam goes. Peanut butter though, I like. 

 

  I think it could've worked if Stan had stayed in the band. There's nothing that Tom wrote that he couldn't have handled. I understand the reasons given for his departure/firing. I just think it would've been interesting had he remained, to have that many original members with the band all these years.

cheers

 

 

Very interesting, indeed. I often stated how I could understand and also much lament that the development of things made Stan obsolete from Full Moon Fever on (in reality perhaps gradually so all the way back since 1982, or even longer if Iovine had a say). However I also often stated that I think the pendelum of development seemingly swung back (like Sonny Liston) his way again towards the late 90s, and that I could now definately imagine Stan doing a fantastic job in TP&TH of the 2000s. (Exception, of course, being Highway Companion and parts of Last DJ, where he and the record may not have been the best match.)  For most of the Mojo or Hypnotic Eye kind of stuff, I think Stan's dynamic feverish style would be extremely fitting. Not necessarily better than Steve's, but different, highlighting the soul of it in a way and.. yeah.. perhaps better.. Anyway, to me it's just ironic that Stan was ousted - all personal differences aside, and I know those were key as well - due to musical differences, just to have TP&TH go back towards what could be called more of a "Stan way" within some 10 years of TP letting his Jeff-Jeffs out. Of which Stan already sat through at least 5, before he was let up.  

Edited by Shelter

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