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The Last Dj---what works what doesn't

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The Last Dj is the only known concept album TPATH have released but based on interviews and the finished album, it doesn't seem that coherent or successful as a unified whole which is different from its success as an album of songs.

 

It's interesting that Tom aimed for something different and for whatever reason, didn't see it through.

 

The Last Dj---this is a strong beginning and lays out the theme of the album, the purity of the artist, the visionary loner against the slimy  corporations and their corruptive influences on artists and those who listen to the music. I really liked this song and still do, but when I read someone's opinion that it should've been electric, the riff ringing out with distortion, I agreed and feel it sums up the album itself, while good overall, it doesn't reach its potential.

 

 

Money  Becomes King---the lament of the artist who has become corrupted. A very enjoyable song and unique in that there's no chorus. I like this song quite a bit but find the placement odd, again, not as an album of rock songs but with the theme of the record; it starts out defiantly with the first track but we're already at the corruption of an artist. Maybe it's meant to be a striking juxtaposition but it feels a bit off here.

 

Dreamville---A nostalgic look back at purity, a nice song. To keep from repeating myself, I'll just address the themes of the songs and their strange placement for a concept album later on.

 

 

Joe---I go back and forth on this one, sometimes I'm in the mood for it, sometimes it's too jarringly unpleasant. Certianly does a good job of lambasting the corrupt executive.

 

When A Kid Goes Bad---Another one I like though it seems a bit odd to have two songs related to children on here. I guess this one is more abut the bad influence that Joe pushes. Musically I like it I guess.

 

Like a Diamond---anotehr nostalic innocence song, maybe that's what Tom went with, a constant back and forth between innocence and  corruption, which is a different approach for a concept album.  Except, putting two songs related to corruption back to back Joe and Kid dismisses that idea. I like this song but it touches on the weakness of the record, the plethora of slower paced, almost sleepy songs.

 

Lost Children---I like it though the riff reminds me of that one riff in Mary Janes at the end of the chorus. But it's good to have something a bit uptempo here and it was good they'd stretch it a bit in concert before it was relegated to the forgotten songs pile.

 

This next stretch of the album is very bland and boring for me. These four songs just sink this album.

 

Blue Sunday---I don't care. Another slow draggy number.

 

You And Me---to contradict myself right off the bat, I do like the jaunty swagger of this song. But it doesn't feel connected to the Last Dj concept at all. Aside from the romance of the open road.

 

The Man Who Loves Women---ugghh. I really dislike this song. Just bland, boring, I don't care that it's a tribute to George Harrison, I just don't like it. Don't like the melody. Blehh. Seems like nothing to do with the concept, etihter.

 

Have Love Will Travel---sometimes I think the title is so corny as to be stupid beyond belief and other times, I think it's so corny but revels in that corniness that it actually seems cool. Either way, I don't like this midtempo mush. Seems like a would be anthem that never took off, esepcially with the line about the women loving the song or something, you know the line, it would sometimes elicit a cheer when they'd play it in concert; felt like pandering to the audience the same when Girl on Lsd did. What the hell does this have to do with the concept? I don't know. Maybe it's the sonic blast from the artist that wasn't corrupted, that remains pure and connects with the audience. Too bad it's such a shitty song.

 

Can't Stop the Sun---A good way to end the album and possibly the strongest closing number on one of his records since Zombie Zoo! I like this one quite a bit, though it has a very strong Beatles influence. It definitely connects to the theme of the record. A really nice solo from Mike at the end, this one should've been played during the Mojo tour, it would've fit right in.  Anyway, after so many songs I don't care for or slooooooowwwww the pace of the record, this number is one final hurrah, a defiant dreamy blast of music in the face of corruption and a great way to bring the album to a close.

 

 

Leaving aside talk of hypocrisy,  ticket prices, Highway Companions mishaps and  the set list rut and how they relate to Tom, looking back at the album as a whole, as a concept depicting the battle between pure artistry, what do we have?

 

These seem to directly deal with the theme:

 

 

The Last Dj

Money Becomes King

Dreamville 

Joe

When A Kid Goes Bad

Like a Diamond

Lost Children

Can't Stop the Sun

 

 

I think this makes for a more linear concept album:

 

The Last Dj---lays out the theme

Dreamville---the nostalgic look back at innocence before the corruption

Joe----enter the evil

Money Becomes King---the fan's lament after the effect of Joe

When A Kid Goes Bad---the result of Joe's corruption on the artist

Lost Children---the lament from the Last Dj about the innocents corrupted

Like a Diamond---using "she" as the muse, the internal summoning of strength in the face of corruption, beyond the caustic insanity of Joe and the sorrow of the lost children resulting in:

Can't Stop the Sun---the return of the defiance of the Last Dj a bit more mature having gone through everything and an upbeat ending to the album.

 

 

You could always swap Like a Dimaond and Dreamville, in which case, at the number 2 spot, Like a Diamond is about the purity of following his muse and Dreamville the sentimental look back with the black diamond guitar strings, and this is used to summon up the energy for the defiance at the end.

 

You could also slot in Have Love Will Travel in the second last spot, serving the same purpose as I mentioned above, so you go from a look back or reconnection to the music (Dreamville/Diamond), then the rousing number to the music fans (Have Love Will Travel) before the final defiant anger at the corrupt music companies.

 

 

You've got about a seven or eight song concept album.

 

As released, I don't think it works as a concept album and it doesn't work that well for me, based on the number of slow songs and the pacing of the record but I still enjoy the highs of the record overall.

 

I'm curious what others on here make of this record.

 

cheers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thanks.

 

Two edits:

 

as a concept depicting the battle between pure artistry and the corrupt record industry, what do we have?

 

 

 

As released, I don't think it works as a concept album and it doesn't work that well for me as a regular album either based on the number of slow songs and the pacing of the record, but I still enjoy the highs overall.

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I think a lot of music industry execs were thanking their lucky stars this album was so terrible.  I just listened to a bit of it for the first time in a looong time and still don't like it. As a concept album it is uneven, the sound is sterile and lethargic - it just gives me a cold feeling overall.  This could have been an interesting album, but for whatever reason the ingredients just didn't "gel" together.  I really think if this album had been made at a different time it would have been a lot better.

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I may be in an army of one on this but I'm going to jump in here and defend The Last DJ. :) Never thought I'd be saying that when the album came out first but it has certainly grown on me a lot since then and I rated it just behind Mudcrutch in the 'rate the albums of the 2000's' thread. I can understand the point that as a concept album, if you're looking for proof of the development of a concept from song to song in the album then it probably fails as a concept album (some interesting suggestions above in how the songs could have been layed out to develop the concept theme.) Interesting that Southern Accents too was originally meant to be a concept double album all around the concept of life in the south and southern themes that didn't realise itself as originally intended either...lack of an external producer and lack of set studio times and the fact that the band were by all accounts to a greater or lesser extent burnt out from 2 years on the road and struggling with various substance abuse issues around recording SA....it's an insightful section of RDAD documentary.

 

Marketing the Last DJ album as a concept album about corruption in the music industry as it was at the time probably did the album no favours, it got the industrys backs up, and i also think it confused the public as to what they should expect and experience when listening to the album, so I would blame the marketing side of the record company in how the album was promoted more than any perceived lack of quality on the album.

 

I have learned to look past the marketing concept and just look at the album as a collection of songs and on that basis I have revisited The Last DJ and I rate the songs and the production sound of the album comes across very well to my ears, as I mentioned in previous thread, The Last DJ is the best sounding album of 2000's from a production standpoint  to my ears. Also the last brave decision TPHB took in the studio working with orchestral arrangements. Listening to the album again a lot recently, I have grown to appreciate and indeed value The Last DJ a lot more and the orchestrations really enrich the sound on the album and John Brion did a great job with that aspect - again i would have been in the camp that a rock and roll band like TPHB should not be working with an orchestra but i've grown to see that it works, sounds great and was artistically brave, pushing out the boat, the last great risk TPHB have taken in the studio.  Probably heard to greatest effect on Dreamville.  

 

It's always interesting how people differ on songs. Have Love Will Travel and Blue Sunday would be two of my favorite songs on the album. ''Maggies still trying to rope a tornado, Joe's in the back yard trying to keep things simple, and the lonely DJ's digging a ditch, trying to keep the flames from the temple''. ''And if perhaps I lose you, in the smoke down the road, I want you to know, you were the one''. Those lyrics always did it for me and i'm always happy to 'Lets have a cheer for all those bad girls and all the boys who play that rock and roll, they love it like you love Jesus, it does the same thing to their souls''.  ;)

 

Blue Sunday is a very evocative mini movie when you listen to the lyrics. ''She took a rolled up twenty out of her pocket and paid for my cigarettes, we were friends at first sight, in the 7 11 light, she said here, let me cover it. And I rode shot gun all that night, she drove and never made a sound. I asked if there was anything wrong, she said nothing worth talking about. Her back seat could have been a hotel, i slept for a thousand years, every now and then she'd laugh out loud for no reason, i pretended not to hear, and rolled my jacket up under my head and stretched my body out, couldn't be too far in front of her Daddy's blood hounds, but I aint going to worry now. A blue Sunday down the inter state - when it's time to leave you go.'' I love the sense of place and story that the lyrics create. Should replace 'You're So Bad' in the set list with 'Blue Sunday' for the acoustic section.     

 

The only weak song on the album to my ears is 'The Man who loves women.' There are lots of examples on the album of how strong a lyric writer TP is and his ability to draw you into an interesting story or to get you thinking with a one liner observation. Some of the lyrics in The Last DJ can be seen as throw away, but that just serves to get you thinking and engaged without feeling like you're being preached at. TP strength as a lyric writer is up there with the best of them, probably doesn't get the credit he deserves for the quality and consistency of his lyrics down through the years....the man who loves women apart and probably 'Yer so bad' as well although i do like the line ''my sisters ex husband, can't get no lovin, walks around dog faced and hurt, now he's got nothing, head in the oven, I can't decide which is worse''.  Quite! :lol:

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That is a great post MJ2LD! And a good idea for a thread, since DJ seems to divide people.

While I don't share all your takes on the songs, I do feel your overall thoughts on the album is quite spot on. And your recontruction of it to be quite fascinating. As a concept album, it would make more sense like that, you are right. (I would like to add that to me Have Love Will Travel is very much integral to the album theme. And not only that. It's also one of his best ever songs.) Like dollardime says, the fact that they marketed it so much as a concept album, even performed it in its entiry at first, as if it still was as complete in real life as it once may have been inside TP's head, as if they actually thought the theme worked - may be part of the problem. I think they either should've sharpened the concept to make it work, or just canned it. They should perhaps have blurred the initial intentions at least in part when it started to derail, reworked it, and pitched it more along the lines of a normal upcoming album pitch. It may have helped. That said - I don't know what's in the vault in terms of outtakes and throw-aways. Hence I don't know if it even could've been realized the way it was intended. Either way - as long as they released what they released - and that we can't change - it is problematic. It's a bastard, no doubt.

Like I've said elsewhere I don't think the theme/concept aspect work very well. Despite the best intentions and despite the fact that all the parts to make it work is actually in there. "You and Me" and "The Man Who Loves Women" are put there - in sequence even! - to keep the theme sniffing blood hounds forever off the trail. Then we have Like a Diamond (a mellower mirror/shadow/double to Can't Stop The Sun, sure) and Blue Sunday, that can be shoved into the theme/universe of the record, if only with quite some stretch and a rather extra vivid imagination. To some extent this could be said for Dreamville too. All these songs makes borderline sense for the concept and the best way to squeeze them in snuggly would have been if TP would have done for DJ what Neil Young did for his (very much underrated) Greendale album: That is - a full album length movie to go with the music.*

Then we have the other way to listen. The album as a mere album. Independent of any theme. This is what dollardime suggests, if I'm not mistaken. And I'd say that is fair enough. This approach often salvages a wreck of a concept album. Rock history is full of them. (SA is an ok example, I guess.. although to me that theme seems to have been looser to begin with and while those sessions and that album failed miserably from some specific angles, at least the result still feels more like a theme as does DJ, I think. Nuff of that.) As I see it DJ as an album really does have a few all time high great songs, as well as a really good and organic sound. Again - dollardime is spot on as far as that goes. But still.. I'm a bit "nah" about calling it a great album. Cause, like I often say, a good album takes more than just a "collection of songs". That's the difference between a compilation and an album. And even without the concept aspect, I don't see DJ coming through fully realized. I already stated what songs I find most troublesome from a theme perspective. From an album perspective, I feel the songs that are either too weak (mostly in terms of songwriting, since production is mosly great), at odds with the vibe of the album, or are slightly messing up the "arch" of the album (that is the songs that may occupy a weird slot in the sequence) - or all of the above in some cases - would be Joe and The Man Who Loves Women especially. To some degree also You And Me (although it would work alright on say Full Moon Fever or Highway Companion type albums, or as a single b-side). Also less optimal are Like A Diamond and Money Becomes King, that both seems musically a bit.. shall we say.. few dimensional. Even if the latter is integral to the theme aspect of the album, it's far from it for the album as an album, as I see it. The former has the same type of rare slightly "false ringing", askew or "off-tone" feel that I also hear on some of the lesser moments of Echo, Highway Companion and even Wildflowers - other discussion.

Sum: As I see it DJ falls short both as a concept album as an album-album. The merits are a handful of some of TP's best ever songs (Dreamville, Lost Children, Blue Sunday, Can't Stop The Sun, Have Love Will Travel.. perhaps also in part the title track..) and the over all great production and sound. If it wasn't for the lows being so very low, in terms of songwriting (comparatively speaking), I'd probably have plenty reasons to hail this album somewhere in the top five, rather than among the bottom five in my personal TP albums ranking, but so it goes. Last DJ is something. It's very good in some ways. Just not in an album way and certainly not in a concept album way. Bummer on some of those songs.

 

It's always interesting how people differ on songs. Have Love Will Travel and Blue Sunday would be two of my favorite songs on the album. ''Maggies still trying to rope a tornado, Joe's in the back yard trying to keep things simple, and the lonely DJ's digging a ditch, trying to keep the flames from the temple''. ''And if perhaps I lose you, in the smoke down the road, I want you to know, you were the one''. Those lyrics always did it for me and i'm always happy to 'Lets have a cheer for all those bad girls and all the boys who play that rock and roll, they love it like you love Jesus, it does the same thing to their souls''.

Me too! Quite right!

-------

* Man, that is a good idea if I may say so myself. Imagine if The Last DJ was released as a double CD/DVD with a 6 or 7 track, keen and pungent, mini-album with an film to go with it, perhaps a little book too, to expand on the story and aestetics. I'd love to see The Last DJ - The Movie. Feat. Harry Dean Stanton. "Coming to you live, from his shack down in Mexico". On all levels.. that would be to more fully realizing the idea and it would make so much more sense, musically, luyrically and even politically, as a statement. Only too bad it's 13 years or more too late for that idea...

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I can appreciate your "army of one" status on this, dollardime. That line you quoted from Have Love, "...all the boys who play that rock and roll..." yes, that's the line I dislike! Blehh. I think if the music had been different I could enjoy the song, I get the point of view behind it. And yes, differing on songs, it's part of what keeps this place going.

 

Anyway, I see where you're coming from on this album.

 

I forgot about Southern Accents, that's strange, he's got two unfulfilled concept albums! Maybe the third time he'll pull it off, eh?

 

Nice observation on the orchestra, I think they were used effectively on this album,j creating a nice textured backdrop and accompaniment for what TPATH were doing. In addition to a more electrically driven the Last Dj song, perhaps a quick violin solo would've been good too.

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That is a great post MJ2LD! And a good idea for a thread, since DJ seems to divide people.

While I don't share all your takes on the songs, I do feel your overall thoughts on the album is quite spot on. And your recontruction of it to be quite fascinating. As a concept album, it would make more sense like that, you are right. (I would like to add that to me Have Love Will Travel is very much integral to the album theme. And not only that. It's also one of his best ever songs.) Like dollardime says, the fact that they marketed it so much as a concept album, even performed it in its entiry at first, as if it still was as complete in real life as it once may have been inside TP's head, as if they actually thought the theme worked - may be part of the problem. I think they either should've sharpened the concept to make it work, or just canned it. They should perhaps have blurred the initial intentions at least in part when it started to derail, reworked it, and pitched it more along the lines of a normal upcoming album pitch. It may have helped. 

 

    That could've worked but the interesting thing is, I still like it as a failed concept album!

 

While I've never listened to it in either of those alternate track listings, (though I probably will at some point) I'm glad it exists even in this unfulfilled form.

 

And I also like the theme of the album as well. So, even though it didn't work, wasn't realized, I'm still glad it was released as is.

 

We've already had what you suggested in Southern Accents. If I'd never heard of that record being conceived as a concept album I never would've thought of it based on those songs. 

 

So I'm glad TPATH released a proper (though failed depending on whom you ask) concept album.

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 From an album perspective, I feel the songs that are either too weak (mostly in terms of songwriting, since production is mosly great), at odds with the vibe of the album, or are slightly messing up the "arch" of the album (that is the songs that may occupy a weird slot in the sequence) - or all of the above in some cases 

 

    That's pretty much it; I just don't care for a lot of the songs on here. They sound good, though. 

 

      I love Money Becomes King, I think it's one of his most unique compositions, from the lack of a chorus, to the plaintive quality of his voice rising and falling with the strings; it's a very pretty and sad song.

 

  I wonder what other people think of this record, will more join dollardime's defense?

 

cheers

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I listened to a bunch of this earlier and I really like the transition from the opening riff to the verse chords, the latter sounding so gentle in comparison in Lost Children.

 

The riff that leads into the solo is pretty good too. There's something somewhat similar in Saving Grace that I also like.

 

It was good when they'd stretch the ending out when they played this one.

 

cheers

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It was the Last DJ who defied Joe, who inspired the boys who play that rock and roll who to go down to Lilians Music Store to buy a black diamond string! 

Well. It was either him, or that cat namned Johnny who talked rock and used to walk it too. That is, way before he played for VIP circles and co-deal sponsors and crowds talking through all the music, paying little mind to anything real in the music but the symbolic anthems and the myths. Johnny rock that golden circle, and all those VIP's, before the Music had become a routine, before you could see his face in close-up trying to give it all he had, and sometimes his eyes betrayed him, you could see that he was sad. Seems to me that the lesson we learn from this album is that Joe was right all the time. Evil prevail. That it doesn't take all out commercial add deals to have rockers end up in an ages old image of themselves, a juke box as it were. Still I try to rock on with Johnny, but I slowly I become bored. Oh, I do. But still.. no, I'm not bored at all. Cause Johnny still deliver ass kicking wonderful records for me to dwell upon and the DJs with their heads screwed on right and the people who care to make a difference, still play those records and all that music that free us, no matter how much routine it gets up there on the big stage and how little of it Johnny himself care about. There will always be the ones who know and care about this aspect, this dimension, of music, and the ones who don't. So what. There still is a real world here and it's spinning. It's all that matters. And I still like the message. I really like the DJ message a lot. Thanks for reminding what a nice message it it. Now the actual world on the other hand.. Oh my precious..

 

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I've always been a big fan of radio, records and concerts.  Growing up in the Cleveland area we had an embarrassment of riches in all three.  There truly was "rock and roll across the dial", there were more records sold per capita here than anywhere in the country, and every tour big and small stopped in Cleveland.  Having witnessed the slow decline of all three beginning in the mid-1980s, I immediately identified with a lot of what Petty was saying on this album.  Musically though, I really didn't care for the production.  I can do without a string section on most records, but those "grunge" sting arrangements heavy on cellos that were popular around that time sounded awful.  To me, they just dulled the music rather than enhancing it.

I'll tell my "Money Becomes King" story if anyone's interested.  A couple years before this album came out, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band were making a comeback so I got up early one Saturday morning to get tickets.  I was third in line at the Ticketmaster outlet so I figured I'd get good seats.  What I got was second last row in the upper level of the arena behind the stage.  The sound was so bad you could hardly tell what song they were playing.  From my vantage point way up there I could see the teleprompter on the stage at Springsteen's feet and something occurred to me.  He can't remember the words to the songs he wrote, and I know all the words but can't understand what he's saying.  "There was no use in pretending, no magic left to hear."  You said it Tom.

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^ Yeah, "Cleveland rocks" right?! :D

 

I was third in line at the Ticketmaster outlet so I figured I'd get good seats.  What I got was second last row in the upper level of the arena behind the stage.

 

Kinda reminds me of my HCC days.. Oh, how royal the screws. But with TP there was always good sound and a good show though, admittedly! Always a pro that way. Besides - you have to be happy for all the golden circle crowds of sponsor guests, sweepstake winners and Facebook give-away ticket holders. They too deserve to get lucky sometime.. to quote a phrase. And they probably even liked a couple of the songs too.. :D 

 

From my vantage point way up there I could see the teleprompter on the stage at Springsteen's feet and something occurred to me.  He can't remember the words to the songs he wrote, and I know all the words but can't understand what he's saying.  

Ironic, isn't it? I am no BS fan myself, as I often professed. And what you say about the low brow ticket proceedures and sound quality is clean-cut - there's simply no excuse for such b-band behavior at this level - especially not the combination of the two - even if fans are demoted to custumers, the way most artists do these days, we are not cattle. However, the implications of the above are otherwise somewhat tricky when I start thinking of it. 

I mean, what would you rather have: 

a ) Frequent three hours, 30 songs, energetic, sometimes curfew breaking shows - more often than not with deeply varied set lists, with more than a pinch in there for everyone, including the band - delivered in parts with telepromter aid? Or

b ) A usually 90 minutes maximum, 18-20 song set with 90% predetermined, even scripted, material night after night, not to say year after year. (And even then there's been discussions of teleprompting in the TP camp too from time to time - about which I have no clue, but find rather.. shall we say.. unlikely.. ). 

Oh, I know.. those remaining 10% , in the b ) alternative are sometimes to die for and alone worth the ticket- no denying that. And the bulk 90 is always nice enough of course, but still.. Speaking of telepromters, I am curious where people stand. Seems to me, personally, that if someone rehearse an honestly asserted and fairly large number of songs before kicking off a tour, a real fan would be happy to hear at least half of those performed during the cause of the tour, even if one or two of them, on some night would take a glimpse at a teleprompter. But that's me. And I am even known - not only to be a rascal - but also to have voiced the firm opinion that telepromting is NOT for rehearsed songs, but for what you might decide to to in the spur of the moment, and that, shall we agree, is not the name of the game for TP.

That said, I've been to fantastic shows where there's even been sheet music present on stage, on prominent racks..  Ok.. we, might be leaving the realm of rock'n'roll here. But honestly.. how Rock'n'Roll is Ticketmaster anyway? We all know who we are and who's King, right? Which brings us, just in time, back on topic...

 

 

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Bumping this thread...I don't know why I ever posted in this thread. The Last DJ is the late period HBs Let Me Up (I've Had Enough). It's an underrated gem, sonically different from other albums by the band,and vastly overlooked and or disregarded as a bust. Like with Let Me Up, I disagree with the notion that this album is a bust. I'll give a full review later but for now I'll just say this: I admire this albums spirit tremendously, I love the story, moral and concept behind it, and I wish the band and Tom wouldn't have turned it's back on the album and stick to their guns on it. There should be no shame in having this album be apart of your work. It may be their least successful album (I don't think it even went gold) but it is a benchmark and a high point for the band.

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A vastly under rated song from a vastly under rated album. Rocks pretty heavy live too - I love this performance. They should pull this one out of the bag more often to play live.

Just like the album, this song from it really grew on me, especially seeing it live on The Last DJ DVD. At first I thought the lyrics were a bit too preachy and on the wrong side of earnest listening on the CD, but I changed my mind over time. There is a universal and plaintive truth in the humanity of the lyrics.

At it's heart, Lost Children is a hard rocking gospel song rooted in a perceptive understanding of the human condition, like people can go good and bad through their experience of living in this world. The hope is that there will be more good than bad on their journey to 'lead them home again' when they learn lifes lessons through experience.

It's much harder to write a song like this and make it credible and listenable, then it is to write a song about sex drugs and rock and roll (great and all as many of these songs are) :)

Lost Children, for me is a great song for these reasons. The band seem happy and energised to be playing the song too...i'd guess because it is something different and rare for them to play live as well as being a heavy barn burning rocker of a song!

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I've always been kind of ambiguous about The Last DJ. It's none of my favorites. I love the title track, I think it's one of Tom's absolutely best songs ever, but the others can't keep up with that one. The concept of sorts gets lost underway, the reason(s) for which I never understood, and picked up again at the end... strange.

Dreamville is a heartbreakingly beautiful song, and there are a handful of nice tunes somewhere in the middle: You And Me, Like a Diamond, Blue Sunday, Can't Stop The Sun... even Have Love, Will Travel is somewhat o.k.

But Money Becomes King, Joe, When a Kid Goes Bad, Lost Children, The Man Who Loves Women (what's THAT doing on the album anyway???)... I never really liked those. Sound uninspired to me. And, what's worse, uninspiring.

All in all, the album as a whole is a tad too angry and depressing at the same time for me. A bit like Echo.

Edited by TwoGunslingers

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But Money Becomes King,

I think it's one of his most unique songs, a dreamlike melody without a chorus. Think how odd that is for Tom, who writes songs with verse/chorus/solo (bridge) structures. The strings on this one help create a strange, floating feeling, like you're listening to a fable. It's sad and fits the themes of the record, yet could also be heard outside of that context as a lament on its own.

cheers

 

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The Man Who Loves Women (what's THAT doing on the album anyway???)...

I agree! Terrible song. I understand it's a tribute to George Harrison (only because I read that somewhere) but I don't care. It's an awful song. This album needed more rockin' songs, not this weird beatles/jeff lynne hybrid. I just tried listening to it before finishing this post and I stopped. 

cheers

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I've always been kind of ambiguous about The Last DJ. It's none of my favorites. I love the title track, I think it's one of Tom's absolutely best songs ever,

I like the song, but don't feel as strongly about it as you do. I remember reading an opinion saying it should've been more electric and I agreed; picture the same riff,  but with more of a bite to it. Would that approach have worked for you or you're happy with it as is?

cheers

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I think it's one of his most unique songs, a dreamlike melody without a chorus. Think how odd that is for Tom, who writes songs with verse/chorus/solo (bridge) structures. The strings on this one help create a strange, floating feeling, like you're listening to a fable. It's sad and fits the themes of the record, yet could also be heard outside of that context as a lament on its own.

cheers

 

True, it's somewhat outstanding compared to Tom's usual writing style. And it does have an interesting chord progression... but I just never really returned to it after I had been listening to it because it was on the new Tom Petty album. Somehow it didn't stick.

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