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Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/21/2020 in Posts

  1. 2 points
    martin03345

    Tom Petty "The Woods"

    The Last DJ is a top 5er for me lol
  2. 2 points
    Still can't quite wrap my head around that latest runaround, there. Particularly absurd, it all seems to me. Even more so than it used to. Still, it all makes me wonder, in this information technology era of ours - does everything HAVE to be detours, dead ends and desinformation? Couldn't some of the insiders just post a smiley face over at the Nation, that as if by accidentally tells us (in sound or text) a rough time line and/or direction for what they are thinking? Now, to have anything that even remotely resembles correct and coherent information is obviously not an option with these people and with this issue. Nevertheless, it's a known fact that joyful shout outs and smilies are all the rage at TPN so, why not try to sneak some actual and useful information out that way, then? In case anyone failed to notice - there are quite a few of us out here who want to know what's up with this material still, and so far, years on end, we have been taken for a really rickety ride. Granted.. we die hards are not growing in numbers with the years passing, this is true, but still.. I just hope they will achieve something tangible eventually. With or without live performance considerations- to me that is gotta be so secondary right now. Let's just hope they focus on the unheard music and that they want to share it all with us as true to original shape and form they can possibly allow their busy little fingers to do. That they take the musical ques from the real pros (Ben, Mike, Ryan) if anything further is deemed needed. And.. yeah.. I never thought I'd hear myself say this - knowing my feelings about the "industry" part of music industry, and the corrupt ways of big labels - but I really wish the WB/Reprise people are willing to help out this case at long last, because in terms of final product finish, marketing and general professionalism, I have to admit they are probably the most reliable player in what otherwise seems a mess of pride, tantrums and personal interest. I hope for as professional release as possible, that is. (Don't get me wrong. As a "family release" AAT was just fine, of course. It made sense and it was well curated, musically. And fairly well produced physically too. But for any other archival projects, aimed at certain eras or albums, as is WF, I really hope they will allow for a strictly professional product, keeping the family emotions and ambitions well to the side and leaving all musical and technical considerations to the real professionals that was part of creating this art to begin with. I bet it's tempting, but a Jane angle or Adria filter, or artwork concept, for a Wildflowers release is not gonna work to it's credit, to be blunt. With AAT out of their system, the family, IMO, need to step back and try to be as invisible as possible and leave the actual handy work to the real professionals involved. As hurtful as it may seem, it's the art of their dad and his coworkers that people are gonna be interested in. As far as I can tell, the family was never involved that deeply in the work, the writing, sequencing or producing albums back then, so why should they now. Ok if there were no one else around. Ok if this kinda work was actually their thing. But it somehow strikes me as "all the wrong reasons" are put into effect on most levels of decision making here. Let's hope I'm wrong. Ok. I better put one of these here at the end, then: )
  3. 2 points
  4. 1 point
    Shelter

    Wildflowers (all the rest) tracks?

    * ----- * I know, hu. Oh the clever people I hang with.. when offline too.. It was a wonderfully weird night, let me tell you. Amazing to hear stuff like that over the usual chatter of a busy saturday night kitchen scene.. The two of them unknowingly treated me with quite a few briliant exchanges. Not sure if it helps in appreciating the deeper side of things, but one of the guys in above quoted situation is a pretty big fan of Radiohead. The other was just drunk. Completely different. You said it.
  5. 1 point
    OK this is not too bad. I have a suggestion to retain the concept album and flush it out to LP form and its kind of simple. The Last DJ Lost Children Money Becomes King Blue Sunday Dreamville Joe Like a Diamond Can't Stop the Sun You and Me Have Love Will Travel For Real Now I'm not a fan of "Joe" as an overall song, it's kind of abrasive at best but the 'you get to be famous I get to be rich" is a nice counterpoint to the lyrics of For Real. For real also makes a nice coda as its so sparse and reflective and sort of flows with the rhythm of the last two "love songs" I've tracked and listened with 'For Real' at the end, but not with "Joe" in the middle as yet but I feel it will work nicely.
  6. 1 point
    Shelter

    Wildflowers (all the rest) tracks?

    Speaking of whom, I overheard the following late night conversation once, in my own kitchen no less: - Did you hear about Dylan Petty? - Dylan who? - Petty! - Tom's kid? - Yeah.. or.. well.. Dana's kid. - Dana who? - Dana York, she married Tom... - Tom York? - No, man.. Tom Petty.. - Oh.. and.. so, now his kid's named Bob?!
  7. 1 point
    If in doubt, refer to Monty Python. I guess we're the scruffy crowd, in this scenario.
  8. 1 point
    TomFest

    The Last Dj---what works what doesn't

    I'm sad for people that can't appreciate the excellence of "The Last DJ". It's definitely in the top 3rd of Tom's catalog for me. The last truly great record he ever made. The songwriting, arrangements, and performance are all amazing. First rate. Everyone I know loves that record. My family all love it. My kids love it. The band loves it. We've played at least 7 of those songs live, and that's not including "The Man Who Loves Women" - which inspired me to get a uke and learn it. (Spoiler alert - It's really fun!) "When A Kid Goes Bad" in particular is a wonderful jam in "Am" like the Heartbreakers love to do. There are a number of them throughout their career, and it's definitely a favorite key of Tom's to sing in, and Mike's to solo in. The song harkens all the way back to "Dog On The Run" from the Pall's Mall show from late 1976. Very similar feel for me, and even some of the same lead lines are there in both. Tom still has some good power in his voice in 2002. Both songs are gems. For 99% of other artists, "The Last DJ" would be the best record they ever made. For Tom, it still cracks the top 6.
  9. 1 point
    I don't particularly like When A Kid Goes Bad musically or lyrically, plus I don't think it fits well with the album musically or lyrically. Probably the best part of it is the music, it's another attempt to be funky by Tom, like Make It Better or Down The Line. But TPATH isn't really a funk band, and it especially stands out (like a sore thumb) on The Last DJ. Make It Better fits better with the eclectic, frequently horn-oriented Southern Accents album, and Down The Line was a stand-alone B-side. As you note also, WAKGB goes on too long, and it to repetitive. As far as the lyrics, he very well might have been influenced by the Columbine high school shootings, which took place in 1999. But those lyrics don't really fit with the idea of corporations dominating the music industry, and they are also a downer for the listener. On the other songs of Last DJ, they are either criticizing the music industry or offering something more pleasant and uplifting, while WAKGB is neither. Also lyrically it's frankly a little too obvious; from the title we know what it's about. And the singer is saying don't shoot because he doesn't want to get shot; I'm sure TP wouldn't mean to make it sound as if he's only thinking of himself, but the lyrics are rather clunky in making his point. His point is well-intentioned, but that doesn't make it entertaining. Unrelated to TPATH , but possibly of some interest - there's a song called "Jimmy Jimmy" that The Cars performed live in the mid 1980's. It was written by Ric Ocasek for a solo album, but I thought it sounded much better when performed live by The Cars. Ever since Columbine, I think of that event when listening to JJ, despite it being performed 15 years earlier. The narrator of the song is trying to reach out to troubled teen "Jimmy", including telling him "We're all in this together". JJ touches many of the same themes as WAKGB, though less directly, and no shooting is mentioned. There's no resolution, only foreshadowing, but it's arguably chilling in its concluding line: "America, It can happen here".
  10. 1 point
  11. 1 point
    .... Uh.. where did everyone go?! Who turned off the light? What did I miss?
  12. 1 point
    I've seen his bass on stage and mentioned it to fellow Farmers at the shows.
  13. 1 point
    Shelter

    Let's hear it for George...!

    Would have been what 77 today? And yes.. no.. those are not wildflowers.
  14. 1 point
    nurktwin

    Let's hear it for George...!

    My all time favorite!
  15. 1 point
    Shelter

    Wildflowers (all the rest) tracks?

    Ok. I think you excessively underestimate the wicked randomness of HCC in your analysis - it was always a gamble by design, a charming mess at best - but bless your heart. Besides, if they (WB) indeed do have any say and if they indeed have decided to shape things up, at long last, may I suggest it's too late? HCC's whole raison d'etre was ticket presales (and how well that worked may depend on who you ask.) Besides, too bad they'd start with the swag deliveries, if so. Idiotic place to start. I know it's a naive wish on my behalf, but I'd much rather see them (and everyone involved) start and finish with the music, and give all else a rest.. Come to think of it.. with all the previous inactivity from the label regarding this project... no wonder they call it All The Rest.
  16. 1 point
    Hoodoo Man

    Tom Petty "The Woods"

    How quickly people forget that girl on lsd... she gets to be famous we get to be rich...
  17. 1 point
    TheSameOldDrew

    Tom Petty "The Woods"

    Nothing wrong with feeling there were many bad songs mixed in with the good, but I don't feel that way, especially with the early albums (on Shelter and MCA). I honestly like every song on every album from that era (TPATH through ITGWO). Ok I'm not a big fan of Zombie Zoo, but that's a very rare exception. And a lot of people love ZZ. To me the weakest era for me are the Rick Rubin produced trio of albums, but a lot of people love those. So that may be a question of personal taste, rather than what's "good". Last DJ was more back in line with the type of music I like, though Joe, When a Kid Goes Bad, and The Man Who Loved Women are clunkers in my book, and the album would be better off without them, IMO. HC and HE for me are almost entirely good, Mojo is for me a mix of good and bad. But when I look at the entire song catalog, I see a very low percentage of songs I don't like, especially when you remove the 3 Rubin albums, which just don't resonate much with me personally (but I know some people love them, so again I can't say they have "bad" songs). Even the B-Sides "outtakes" for me, such as those in the Playback box, or Somewhere Under Heaven, Sweet William, Don't Treat Me Like a Stranger, etc. are nearly all highly enjoyable to me. That's pretty amazing.
  18. 1 point
    nurktwin

    Classic Rock Video of the Day II

    2/23/20 Heart
  19. 1 point
    nurktwin

    Another New Guitar

    Yikes, I just tuned up this Gibson and plugged it into my Vox Beatle amp and it sounds amazing. There's a P90's crunch even at low watts. I can go from 2 watts to 20 to 50 and up to 200 watts on rotary knob with my amp head and 4X12 Beatle cab. This is great!!!!!! Here's a pix of 1 of my amps.
  20. 1 point
  21. 1 point
    nurktwin

    Classic Rock Video of the Day II

    ^ The original by The Impressions
  22. 1 point
  23. 1 point
    Right, right.. About that.. DBL is the weak spot on my list -by all means. TTCA actually is a better song. I think I may have lost myself a little focusing on dynamics and sequence, and I realize that there is a way to "solve" this particular dilemma, to actually cut the first and add the other. Although, I would make a minor sequence change to make that work, and find myself with an actually even better b-side, thank you. Works great this way: B1. Flirting With Time B2. Ankle Deep B3. Home B4. Turn This Car Around B5. Golden Rose As for Golden Rose, I think that one is generally misunderstood. Certainly a very good and interesting song, both in its own right and as part of the HC context. I would even call it briliant. A masterpiece. And to fully grant it its full potential it has to be the closer. I don't say this often, but to me the song could have gone on even further, longer and preferably lost itself beyond the horizon, so to speak. That is the whole point. End of the road. Eternity. The letting go. Literally. Not to be overly dramatic.. but this is where the album drives off the cliff. Perhaps also, while hanging there in mid air.. this is where all the other great and intense imagery of the album plays out behind the eyelids.. what all led up to this. This understanding of the album really gets intensified by my suggested take on it. And actually, getting TTCA back on there, may in fact have been the missing piece. I'm very happy with that, so thanks for insisting, so to speak.. As for the full 14 song approach that you cling to - that, to my ears, is what drags the whole project, the possible "drive" (yeah, yeah..) of this album down, what blurs the vision and where it's losing both direction and movement. Too much filler, too much sameness, in terms of atmosphere. Dreary... We all seem to agree on Jack. (A bad song and an introduction of a character that basically just complicates matter and makes them too literal, for my taste.) And ATR, TOT and DBL don't add much, musically or otherwise. Again.. charming as they may be in some of their details, they make the album lose it's core element - movement. And in terms of album production -- it's interesting about the drummers, mentioned. I agree. A certain demo-like quality to this album - or at least to some of the songs (TOT perhaps most of all) certainly could be attributed to the minimalist in the extreme rhythm tracks. Again.. TOT and TTCA exposing their bare ankles on their respective set-offs, shows a bone structure both simple, and limited - and extremely similar. Could be a strength, but I'm afraid it could also be boring. And not a good basis for dancing.. or even swaying really. Some songs lack more than others in this department, but at least to my mind, the most lackluster and stagnant moments of the album has been removed on my redux HC - making it at long last something to lean on.
  24. 1 point
    You dropped 4 of the best songs from that album?!? You and MJLD are truly something when it comes to album sequencing. "One More Night" is a great album closer with one of Mike's greatest solos at the end. The album isn't meant to be happy. Are you gonna go back and try to make Blood on the Tracks upbeat? The title song is also a nice song as is and so is "Lonesome Sundown". I get that this is a what if thought experiment, but some things just need not to be explored. As MJLD said, "Even the uptempo songs are dower". So leave well enough alone lol. Now I get that the album is a tad bloated but that just means trim the filler like "No More" and "Accused of Love" and slap "Sweet William" in.
  25. 1 point
    RedfordCowboy

    The firing of Stan Lynch

    https://www.moderndrummer.com/article/february-1984-stan-lynch-heartbreaking-rhythm/ Very cool and insightful interview with Stan Lynch from the Southern Accents era. You really get a sense of him as a person. He discusses his relationship with the band (and vice versa), his drumming rig, singing and playing, pre-show & tour warm ups, and how he's quit the band during the recording of every album. At times, he comes across like big immature teenager, and at other times quite thoughtful and respectful. Always honest. If he didn't like the music, it's style, direction, or disagreed on anything, he was out. He'd leave. You can see the undercurrent of strain it created in the group. Probably exasperated Tom. It's clear he had/has a big personality, was a fun loving guy who was taking a big bite out of life. Looking back, it some times would appear it was 4 against 1....and vice versa. Stan is a good singer. I think he rocks when he gets a turn to cut loose and sing in concert. Howie was a great singer. And let's not get started on Mike. I often wonder if Tom was under-utilizing the Heartbreakers over the years? Semi-related - The fact that he basically told Mike he couldn't put out an album because it would mess up the "Heartbreakers Brand". That's kinda lame to me. He comes across as threatened. I don't think people would think or see it as a Heartbreakes project, or even close to it. We actually like to keep these things separate in our minds and enjoy both for what they are. For example, Carl Broemel, guitarist for My Morning Jacket. He puts out solo albums which are awesome, and then there's his main band, the "main gig." I go see & enjoy both for what they are. Was Tom that worried or intimidated about it? IMHO, Mike served Tom faithfully since day one. I wish Tom couldn't let his friend shine, and give him some glory, as it were. Be excited and supportive of him, give him his blessing, etc. Ya know?
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