Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 10/20/2017 in all areas

  1. 6 points
    Remembering Tom Petty: Mudcrutch’s Second Encore by Larson Sutton on October 20, 2017 Today would have been Tom Petty's 68 birthday. In honor of the legendary singer-songwriter, who passed away early this month, we're looking back to our summer 2016 feature on Petty and his pre-Heartbreakers band Mudcrutch, who reunited in recent years and released their second studio album, 2, last year. This piece was originally published in the June 2016 issue of Relix. It's a soggy Southern California afternoon, and the members of Mudcrutch are enjoying a well-deserved break during a long press day at Warner Bros. Records. Mike Campbell counters the gloom outside with a bright, five-note melody on a nearby piano. The two Toms—Leadon and Petty—inspect a multicolored spread of sliced and chunked fresh fruit. Randall Marsh thumbs through a cardboard box of vinyl LPs. With the feigned tone of an interrogator, Benmont Tench questions Leadon’s fruit choice. “Where did you get that?” he asks. “Is that a Nashville banana?”These are little diversions before the five musicians gather themselves, sitting comfortably on three couches for one last group interview. In a few weeks, Mudcrutch will release 2, the follow-up to the belated eponymous debut they issued in 2008—33 years after their original label let them go and they quickly disbanded. Despite releasing a live EP shortly after Mudcrutch, another eight years have already passed since the group’s improbable 21st-century reunion. “We didn’t get dropped,” Petty, who handles bass duties and lead vocals in Mudcrutch, says of the lag time between albums, to laughs around the room. “It’s amazing.” The notion that a group containing Petty, Campbell and Tench—three-fifths of Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers —could actually be in jeopardy of losing its record deal accounts for considerable irony. But this is, after all, 2016. The music industry business model is in a perpetual state of flux and there are few, if any, guarantees. Mudcrutch were Petty’s band before the band. They coalesced around Gainesville, Fla., in 1970, had some success playing bluesy country-rock on the local Southern rock circuit, relocated to Los Angeles in 1974, released an ill-fated single on Shelter Records and parted ways before Petty’s 26th birthday. Though Petty included a Mudcrutch track on a 1995 box set, the first time many of the most hardcore Heartbreakers fanatics heard about the quintet was when they regrouped in 2007 and released the well-received full-length debut that proved they were still capable of making great music. So, what’s an eight-year hiatus when the first one lasted over three decades? “I was a little nervous about it because I liked the first one so much,” admits Petty. “Because we made [the debut] so off-the-cuff, in like 10 days, I didn’t think that was going to happen again.” “I knew we would sound good,” says Marsh. “We play together; we sound good.” Tench was equally unconcerned. “It feels like a flow to me, with a damn long gap. It didn’t feel forced or unnatural.” Instead of performance apprehensions, it was the writing and recording process that went under a microscope this time around. “I wanted to make more of a proper record,” says Petty. “Rather than a Polaroid, I wanted a nice painting.” But, before anything could happen again for Mudcrutch, there had to be available time. “We’ve all got big lives and families, so scheduling is the hardest part of it,” Petty admits. “We always talked about it like we were going to do it next week—first chance we get.” The biggest of those big lives belongs to Petty himself. While he never refers to The Heartbreakers as “his band,” Petty is unquestionably their leader and eager to respond to any question, albeit in a voice that’s languid and gentle, like honey and lemon tea. He is also deeply self-aware and inspired by the venerated talent surrounding him. While conceiving 2, Petty charged his bandmates with bringing their own material to the session, and encouraged everyone to take turns singing at the mic. The results are more varied than Mudcrutch and appeal to the group’s egalitarian approach. There is Marsh’s “Beautiful World,” with a stripped-back beat and call-and-response bridge, and the sock-hop swing of Tench’s “Welcome to Hell.” Campbell contributes his jackrabbit, jukebox rock on “Victim of Circumstance.” From Leadon, the band got the rollicking “The Other Side of the Mountain,” after Petty requested that the guitarist turn back to his bluegrass roots. “It has a lot of variety to it, which I like,” says Leadon. “It sounds like our band, but different aspects.” Petty says he was particularly hung up on the record’s slant. “I wanted it to be a guitar-based album, but I wanted the sounds to drastically change from track to track.” In fact, the group tasked him with making such tough choices that he still has nine finished cuts in the vault. He points out that those tracks were left on the cutting room floor for sequencing reasons, not because of quality. “I still try to make records that you can still listen to all the way through,” he says. “It’s got to have a roll to it; a beginning, middle and end.” 2 certainly rolls—and rocks— along, feeling overall like a travelogue of American music, all with what Petty calls “a Mudcrutch tip.” One of the more jarring entries is “Hope,” a garage-rock stomper wrapped around a fuzzed-out guitar and pulsing organ. “It’s what Tom and I sounded like in ‘66,” says Petty.At the tender age of 14, Tom Petty attended a show by the Daytona, Fla.-based rock band The Escorts—his first concert—at the American Legion Hall in Gainesville. Four years later, that band’s teenage stars, Duane and Gregg Allman, formed the Allman Brothers. “That’s the first band you ever saw?” Marsh asks, turning to his bandmate. “Holy shit.” Unbeknownst to him at the time, Petty witnessed the nascent work of two siblings who would revolutionize improvisational rock, before The Escorts were relegated to the status of a fond footnote. Certainly Petty’s own colossal success with The Heartbreakers had the capability to rejuvenate Mudcrutch. “I was completely surprised that we did it at all,” says Leadon of the reunion. “How many superstar, Hall of Fame guys at that level are going to go back to the band they had before they ever made it?” “The Heartbreakers had done everything there was to do. Twice. I love that band, and I’ll always be in it,” explains Petty. “I just wanted to see Mudcrutch get its shot.” Mike Campbell sits on the same couch as Petty. He’s been relatively silent, deferring respectfully to his bandmates. When questions of comparisons to The Heartbreakers come up, he vigorously jumps into the conversation.“We’re not thinking, ‘I hope this is as good as The Heartbreakers .’ We’re just trying to be as great as we can be in that moment,” he says. “You’re going for greatness. You’re going for magic.” The others are quick to agree and, for the first and only time during the afternoon’s discussion, they begin to talk over each other. Petty says that Mudcrutch allows him to get away from expectations. Tench points out that The Heartbreakers have never been that calculating. Leadon compliments them all as great musicians. “We get to play with our old friends and explore where that leads us,” says Campbell. “It’s no deeper than that.” Still, there is the undeniable fact that Petty’s voice is among the most distinctive in all of popular music. Campbell’s guitar and Tench’s keyboards have helped cultivate The Heartbreakers’ sound, a staple of American rock radio for the past 40 years with tens of millions of albums sold. Even without making a conscious effort to do so, their trademark, collective style is bound to surface. Tench counters that argument, pointing out the unique swing of the Mudcrutch rhythm section. By virtue of Marsh’s drumming and Petty’s bass style, the “air in this band,” as he refers to it, is inherently different. Campbell mentions his formative years as a teen strumming acoustics with Leadon for hours on end, as the two guitarists developed their own distinguished styles. “In the moment, we’re not worried about any parameters. Ben goes for the organ thing he normally may go for in The Heartbreakers, and I might go with the tonality that goes with that,” Campbell concedes. “Listening back, we say: ‘That’s great, but it sounds a little too much like The Heartbreakers. Let’s rethink that.’” Tench may refer to himself as Mudcrutch’s crank, but the band members unanimously agree that Ryan Ulyate was is an integral arbiter during their recording sessions. The longtime engineer and producer worked on the first album and has collaborated with The Heartbreakers, most recently on 2014’s Hypnotic Eye. “He’s like a sixth Beatle,” says Marsh. Often, a look on Ulyate’s face as he emerged from the control booth was enough of an indicator that something wasn’t clicking. “We’ve learned to trust him,” says Campbell. “He doesn’t let us float,” says Petty. “Neither do I. I set the bar pretty high because I knew they could do it.” Campbell, who usually serves as a co-producer on Heartbreakers records, focused on a cooperative, unified mission to achieve the best possible outcome, while having fun doing it. “We had a mindset that we could fix it, get it right— and we did,” he says. “Nobody got their nose broken.” “I was really proud that we all hung together,” says Leadon. “Everyone was patient. We worked through the rough spots and got to the good stuff.” Mudcrutch only supported their first record with a handful of California shows. This time, the quintet will hit the road in earnest, undertaking a full-scale, coast-to-coast tour. Petty says the band captured first takes in the studio when they could, making this batch of material particularly suited for the live setting. “A show will have its own life,” he says. “There’s room to move.” “You can’t just noodle,” cautions Campbell. “You’ve got to be thinking. You’ve got to compose the arc. And be brave.” One thing is for certain, though. Those hoping to hear The Heartbreakers should leave that wish at home. “We’re not going to throw in ‘Refugee’ to save the festival,” says Campbell. In 2008, Mudcrutch had rehearsed a contingency plan in preparation for their reunion shows, in the event of an overwhelming demand from an audience for a Heartbreakers classic. “But, there was never a hint of that,” Marsh says. “It’s nice—instead of saying, ‘You should’ve seen the band we had back in Florida’—to say, ‘Come see the band we had back in Florida,’” says Tench.For Petty, this current reunion comes after two records and subsequent tours with The Heartbreakers. He says that wherever he went, more often than not, people asked about when Mudcrutch was coming back. And as for whether or not this fits into his present artistic period? “Absolutely. That’s where I’m at right now,” says Petty. “I think it’s of a piece with Hypnotic Eye. It’s a natural place to go from there. It’s just so lucky to get a song. Fortunately, they found a life with this band.” Leadon divulges that there were some personal health issues stunting an earlier reunion. Petty dismisses the topic, saying that if they start discussing the ailments of men in their mid-60s, then they’ll never stop. It does offer a moment of perspective. “It makes me value being able to do this even more,” says Leadon. “To treasure it while we do it.” The reunion isn’t exclusive to the studio and stage, Leadon explains. He and Marsh lived with Petty while the band made the record. “It’s part of the experience, and it’s just a blast, hanging out.” After they wrap up their interviews, the members of Mudcrutch file out one after another into the hallway. A Warner Bros. rep has given each member a copy of the new 7” single pressed especially for Record Store Day. On the cover is a tow ball and hitch, a metaphor for the A-side, “Trailer,” that also opens the album. The B-side is Marsh’s “Beautiful World.” Petty and Marsh stop for a moment and slide the spotless, glossy black 45 out of its sleeve. Marsh notes the thickness of the sleeve paper, remembering, in contrast, how thin it was when he was a kid. For a second, it’s easy to forget that these old friends from Gainesville holding a teenage dream in their hands are rock stars. “When you go that long— Tom and I from our teens—you really value those long friendships we’ve had. So many of us just aren’t here anymore,” Petty says. “They’re all incredibly good musicians, and we can play together and be fulfilled by that. That’s a nice thing.” Read more: https://www.relix.com/articles/detail/remembering_tom_petty_mudcrutchs_second_encore#ixzz4w8MvH3qj
  2. 5 points
    High Grass Dog

    Future Tom Petty Releases

    The realization that there will never be new Tom Petty music or Tom Petty concerts ever again is a hard one to sink in. TP spent a lot of time in the studio and took great pride in crafting a legacy of high quality releases, without a real stinker in the bunch. Even as the pace of releases slowed down in the past decade or so, the quality never waned, and I'm sure he had more irons in the fire for the future that will unfortunately never be realized. Luckily, or at least hopefully, there was quite a backlog of unreleased material that Tony D, Ryan Ulyate, Mike Campbell, Warner Brothers execs and whomever else can mold into very exciting and very worthy releases in the coming years. Here is my list of the top five projects I hope to see: 1. Wildflowers - All the Rest. We've heard the speculation and teases about this for so long, it had actually become a joke. I'm assuming it is complete, so this could theoretically be released at any time. I am hoping for as many unreleased studio tracks as possible, and not just demos and live versions. It's sad there will never be accompanying live shows like TP envisioned, but with so many "new" Wildflowers tracks, this still has the potential to be a very exciting album. 2. DVD of 2017 MusiCares performances. There was quite a lineup assembled to honor Tom Petty this past February. Classics like Randy Newman, Don Henley, Jackson Browne and Lucinda Williams as well as newcomers like Gary Clark, The Head and the Heart, Cage the Elephant and a lot more. It would be a shame to not see all the performances and speeches packaged together, ending of course with the Heartbreakers set and the stand out "Waiting For Tonight." 3. Mojo 2 and Hypnotic Eye outtakes. The Heartbreakers recorded a lot, a lot, of tracks over the past decade that were only represented in two studio albums: Mojo and Hypnotic Eye. I would be incredibly excited to see a package of all the finished tracks that didn't make it on those albums. It would start with Mojo outtakes ("Mystery of Love" comes immediately to mind), but concentrate on the aborted Mojo follow up album that TP described as "blues to another power." This would have been in 2011 or so. I believe they had a lot of tracks completed, but only "Burnt Out Town" ever saw release. Then TP changed course and decided to do a straight ahead rock n roll album with all new songs. Years later, Hypnotic Eye came out after being whittled down from dozens of new tracks to just 11. There is bound to be lots of great stuff in the Hypnotic Eye outtakes. "Looking For Daddy" might be among them. Putting all this together would be simply amazing to me. 4. Mudcrutch 3. It was stated in multiple interviews that TP and co. left eight or so finished tracks on the floor for the second Mudcrutch album last year. I would love to see all those tracks as a stand alone album, possibly packaged with "Special Place," the outtake from Mudcrutch 1 in 2008, or maybe with unreleased stuff from the original aborted Mudcrutch album in 1974 (or before). I supposed a Mudcrutch boxset could accommodate all of that, even if it gets bloated with live tracks and already released studio tracks. 5. Greatest Hits Part II. This seems like an eventuality as well, since Warner never put out a compilation of material from Wildflowers on. We've had some good discussion here on what could be included. It would be fun to see YDKHIF, Walls, Room at the Top, Saving Grace, etc. on the same album, even if all those tracks are already available elsewhere. There's bound to be lots of other stuff in the vaults as well! I remember an interview from 2006 in which TP said he had a "good 60 percent of a Heartbreakers album waiting to be finished." I'm pretty sure all the Mojo stuff four years later was completely new, so there should be some mid '00s tracks out there to hear. Plus, I'm sure a live album or DVD of the 40th anniversary tour is probably a sure thing. What do you guys think about these ideas? And what others would you add?
  3. 4 points
    nurktwin

    Dylan covers Petty

    https://www.spin.com/2017/10/bob-dylan-tom-petty-learning-to-fly-cover-live-watch/?utm_source=yahoo&utm_medium=syndication
  4. 4 points
    Miami Steve

    Tour history 1976 - 2017

    Precious memories of concerts past... March 19, 1976 Van Nuys Recreation Center, Van Nuys, CA (as Tom Petty and Nightro) November 24, 1976 Performing Arts Center, Tampa, FL November 25, 1976 Performing Arts Center, Tampa, FL November 27, 1976 Other Place Niteclub, Miami, FL cancelled? November 28, 1976 Other Place Niteclub, Miami, FL cancelled? November 30, 1976 Municipal Auditorium, Columbus, GA opening for Kiss December 3, 1976 George's Galaxy Lounge, Cocoa Beach, FL December 4, 1976 George's Galaxy Lounge, Cocoa Beach, FL December 12, 1976 Paul's Mall, Boston, MA opening for Al Kooper December 14, 1976 CBGB's, New York, NY December 15, 1976 CBGB's, New York, NY December 22, 1976 Exit/In, Nashville, TN opening for Al Kooper February 9, 1977 Whisky a Go-Go, West Hollywood, CA opening for Blondie February 10, 1977 Whisky a Go-Go, West Hollywood, CA opening for Blondie February 11, 1977 Whisky a Go-Go, West Hollywood, CA opening for Blondie February 12, 1977 Whisky a Go-Go, West Hollywood, CA opening for Blondie February 14, 1977 Keystone Palo Alto, Palo Alto, CA with the Greg Kihn Band February 15, 1977 Keystone Palo Alto, Palo Alto, CA with the Greg Kihn Band February 17, 1977 Keystone Berkeley, Berkeley, CA with the Greg Kihn Band February 18, 1977 Keystone Berkeley, Berkeley, CA with the Greg Kihn Band February 19, 1977 Keystone Berkeley, Berkeley, CA with the Greg Kihn Band February 25, 1977 Ivanhoe Theater, Chicago, IL February 28, 1977 Agora Ballroom, Cleveland, OH cancelled March 7, 1977 Bottom Line, New York, NY opening for Roger McGuinn March 8, 1977 Bottom Line, New York, NY opening for Roger McGuinn March 9, 1977 Bottom Line, New York, NY opening for Roger McGuinn March 10, 1977 Agora Ballroom, Cleveland, OH opening for the Runaways March 13, 1977 Bogart's, Cincinnati, OH March 14, 1977 The Flying Machine, Akron, OH March ??, 1977 Royal Oak Music Theatre, Royal Oak, MI opening for the Runaways with Cheap Trick April 23, 1977 Record Plant, Sausalito, CA KSAN radio broadcast April 24, 1977 Winterland, San Francisco, CA opening for Bob Seger & the Silver Bullet Band with Starz April 26, 1977 Whisky a Go-Go, West Hollywood, CA April 27, 1977 Whisky a Go-Go, West Hollywood, CA Next installment - the group heads off to England.
  5. 4 points
    Dan

    Benmont Tench

  6. 4 points
  7. 4 points
    Nel

    Prayers for Tom Petty - 1950-2017

    I don't know if this has been posted here yet. Dana's letter: Sending my love and a long overdue heartfelt thank you for the outpouring of love, cards, gifts, flowers, donations and your prayers. Your sentiments mean the world to me, our 3 children, and our family. I have yet to turn on a tv or computer, but I understand that most of you grieved, right along with me and those who loved him dearly; our kids- Adria, AnnaKim and Dylan, our granddaughter, Everly. Tommy’s only sibling, Bruce, his wife, kids and grandchildren, cousins, my family, the Heartbreakers; brothers of 40+ years, his longtime devoted crew and management teams, many close friends, and his amazing fans . Those who knew him well, knew he was so much more than a musical icon and amazing artist... he was a beautiful, compassionate, empathic, complicated, generous, and a very private man. He was Tommy; who was, hands down, the coolest man, friend, dad, grandfather, bandmate, brother, son, uncle, cousin, boss, lover, soulmate, husband. He loved with all he had and if you could see us now, (including his beloved dog, Ryder), you would understand how shattered and lost we all are. His beloved 10 year old yellow English lab, Ryder, is grieving with me. He holds my hand (paw in hand), and I honestly watch tears flow from his eyes. I’ve never before seen a dog cry. Losing Tommy is, by far, the most devastating event in my life. Selfishly, I wish he were here with me. With all of us. Tragically he isn't and it can only mean that we will have to turn to each other now, and learn to be strong and go on without him, our king, patriarch, fearless leader. He would want us to all remain united as friends, family, comrades...and his beloved fans-who encouraged him to keep going, to keep reaching higher and higher-please know, how much he loved and appreciated each one of you and know, he will always be with you. All of us combined gave him a forever family and the respect and admiration he deserved since he came into this world. He needed that love. No one was more deserving than TP. He was compassionate, kind, full of integrity when it came to how he lived his life and his music. Sensitive, yet tough as nails when fighting for justice. He cared about the average joe as much as as he did high profile folks, especially when they had a shared passion for the art of music, no matter what genre or what position one held as part of his team, be it touring, recording, sound mixing, producing, engineering, film, photography, critics, radio staff, management and administrative staff, business management, security, personal assistants, drivers, personal staff, radio listeners, fans, friends, so many friends, family: anyone--who shared his deep love of music, was held on high regard. Duckhead (Scott T.), Mike, Ben, Ron, Steve, Bugs (Alan W), Ryan U, Richard F., Mark C., Dean C., Queenie-Linda, Mary K, Robert S., Chris A., Bernie G, Anna M, Tony D, Randal W., Mark F., Tommy L, Randall M, Greg L, Dr. Jim, George D, Peter B, Jeff L, Olivia & Dhani H, Stevie N, Dan M, Glenn P.,Jack D & Regina S, Mimi (Dolores), Randal W., Peter B, Sean P, the Vedder’s, the Shelters, the Webb sisters, so many musician pals, too many to list here, and on and on... along with many of his closest friends, lost too soon... He enjoyed reading mail from radio show fans and jotting down their requests. He fought with all he had to keep his art, his music affordable and ticket prices fair & away from scalpers--he truly cared. He never forgot where he came from; his humble beginnings, he hated pretense + sell-outs, manufactured fame, music + film theft, all of that bullshit that pretty much killed the industry...he was a moral, humble, genuinely kind, a musical genius, a total badass who knew how to make his point, whatever tactics he pulled out of his hat... our fearless TP. Who never once sold out! ❤️ He had an amazing sense of honor and humor. A bit (lot) of cynicism and quick wit and always a ready laugh. And work wise, that he could keep a band together for over 40 years is amazing and speaks volumes about him and each member of the band. To nurture one another and cultivate creativity for that long is a testament to him and all of you. He loved each of them like brothers. As well as his crew. And their unwavering dedication to Tommy is a reflection of his love and dedication to them. He loved his family so much. Our children, Adria, AnnaKim, Dylan and our beloved granddaughter, Everly. He loved all of us, every single day and we benefited from it in every human way possible. We were truly blessed to have him love us so profoundly. He was my very best friend, my sublime soul mate, the very very best husband, a wonderful father and grandfather, brother, uncle, boss/leader, and friend. I will miss him every minute of everyday. Our lives are forever changed by his presence and love. I hope that we continue to allow that to incapsulate us and protect us. He would want that. For us to band together in love and humor. And be present. To live. He will always be with us. His music was everything to him and it will live forever in the world. We are truly blessed. Thank you for all you have given me, my love. And for your beautiful and eternal mark on the world. And thank you friends and family for your thoughtful, loving kindness and support through this incomprehensible and unbearable loss. ❤️Dana Petty💔
  8. 4 points
    Miami Steve

    Future Tom Petty Releases

    I wouldn't mind a "Bootleg Series" type project similar to Bob Dylan's. There's a lot of possibilities there for different volumes. The original Mudcrutch recordings, full versions of the concerts that made up The Live Anthology or every major tour for that matter, Southern Accents sessions, a collection of the Heartbreakers' sets from the Bob Dylan tour, the Fillmore shows or one of the other residencies, a compilation of all the B-sides and outtakes that are scattered across different releases plus the still unreleased stuff. As much as I think Tom got the recognition he deserves over the past 10 years or so, I think their legacy as a great live band has yet to be fully revealed on disc.
  9. 4 points
  10. 4 points
    Very nice article and I love the pictures. They did a boo-boo on the very first line though! It would have been Tom's 67th birthday! I feel bad for the guys knowing Mudcrutch will never play together again but I'm so happy for them at the same time, to get to put out 2 records with Tom and go out on 2 tours! That is such a blessing!
  11. 4 points
    nurktwin

    Your prized Petty possessions

    I have a few things that I cherish. A lot of guitar picks, Autographs on books and DVD's, extra covers that Tom signed and gave out to a few people. I also have 1 of the 1000 made Tom Petty Rickenbacker 660/12 signature models. One of my favs is a RIC 360/12V64 George Harrison model that I tried to get George to sign and sent him the pickguard to sign and included return envelope and postage. Sadly he passed away before I ever got it back. Later on I took a pickguard with me to Seattle and a few of us drove to the Gorge to see TPATH play. We were there bright and early sitting in the grass on the hill overlooking the stage and river and drinking beer! About 2 or 3 in the afternoon, I made a call to Chinner and he said "What the hell are you doing up there, come down to the gate and I'll meet you there in 5 minutes", So we went down to the gate. Chinner was already there and told the gate keeper to open up and let us in. We went to the stage and BS'd while he was working. I told him I had a pickguard that I wanted to get signed and he asked if I wanted just Tom or the whole band, and I didn't know. I finally said lets get the whole band and we did!!!! So now that George Harrison RIC is signed by TPATH and is my favorite guitar. I also have an autographed Fender Tele by Mike Campbell that he signed at Cozy's in LA (Sherman Oaks I think). I'm sure there are other things I'm forgetting right now, but those are a few of my prized possessions. But, most important to me are the memories and meeting people from the Farm to share those exciting times together.
  12. 4 points
    crossfire

    Your prized Petty possessions

    Generally speaking, I not much of a collector other than the music. But I was at the Petty show at Forest Hills, NY and my wife & I were walking around before the show and enjoying a few adult beverages. I walked by a booth & they had this little booth with posters on it for a bunch of different shows. It would’ve been very easy to walk right by but I noticed somebody in the booth and went up and talk to him. Apparently Forest Hills has posters made specifically for each artist who plays there. The poster for the two Forest Hills shows was limited to 50 numbered copies & you couldn’t even buy it that night. They just gave a website address to me. The poster wasn’t even available that night. Several days later it finally popped up on the internet. I wasn’t able to get #1 of 50 so I asked if I could get #40 of 50 in honor of the tour being the 40th Anniversary of TP&THBs. This is the poster.
  13. 4 points
    crossfire

    Honoring Tom's birthday

    I have always loved music since I was a kid. The Stones really grabbed a hold of me. I think it was their raw energy. And being born in the mid-60s, I grew up loving all the classic rock bands and classic rock songs. All of those bands had really been around my whole life. But there I am in late 70’s and I start hearing this band called Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers. They were new and it felt like I was discovering them as they were still in the very early stages. I jumped on the train and never got off. I’m sure there are others on here who could marvel me with the amount of shows you have seen or members you have met or TP&THBs items you own. And I am sure I would be a bit envious... in a good way. But for me, this loss has hit my musical part of my soul. I think it’s because I felt in my heart that they were my band. I heard the band from the beginning and first saw them in the early 80s. And though I wasn’t a regular here, I keep popping by because I know that you’re all hurting at least as much as me. It’s nearly 2 am and I can’t sleep. My mind is stuck on Tom. Sorry for the ramble. I just needed to express the feelings again. Have a Happy Birthday in Heaven Tom Thanks for leaving part of you behind for all of us to enjoy. God bless. 🎩💔
  14. 3 points
    martin03345

    Benmont Tench

    Here's the set list from the Largo show: https://www.setlist.fm/setlist/benmont-tench/2017/largo-at-the-coronet-los-angeles-ca-33e0bc1d.html
  15. 3 points
    " Danny Roberts posted this on Facebook. His comments on the track are as follows: "This is a fun track recorded by "Mudcrutch" in 1974. It has an almost Tex-Mex feel to it and is a great, fun recording and was written by Tom Petty." "Please excuse the places where the sound briefly sounds dull for a second. I made this from a tape of rough mixes I've been draggin' around for the last 43 years." Pseudo Tex-Mex
  16. 3 points
  17. 3 points
  18. 3 points
    Jay

    HEARTBREAKERS MTV BEACH PARTY

  19. 3 points
    crackfox

    Future Tom Petty Releases

    - Playback 2. Covering all the Warner best hits, singles, b sides and studio outtakes. -Wildflowers All the Rest. With an extra CD of Michael Kamen orchestration please
  20. 3 points
    10/26/17 TPATH & Stevie Nicks
  21. 3 points
    martin03345

    Benmont Tench

    I personally love Benmont's album. It has a lot of great songs on there. I love "Today I Took Your Picture Down", "Blonde Girl, Blue Dress", "You Should Be So Lucky", "Veronica Said", and "Why Don't You Quit Leaving Me Alone". Those songs show that Benmont can write well thought out, interesting, and complex songs and that he is more than just the best damn piano player in rock. Now do I think his voice would lend itself to being a front man of a rock band? No, not at all. But I don't think he has to. His album shows he could have been heralded as a great singer/songwriter in the vein of Randy Newman and Leonard Cohen. Not a mainstream figure, but a popular, well received my his peers, influential musician and writer. The one thing I wish though, is although I like the Beatleesque "Like the Sun", I wish he recorded it like he played it on Jimmy Kimmel as a piano ballad. It is so great and beautiful. Unfortunately, you cannot find that version anywhere anymore. It use to be on YouTube but somehow it vanished into the ether.
  22. 3 points
    Susan, that was beautiful to read. Thank you for sharing that. Well, I did share when this first happened....here at the Farm. But I shared this again on FB so I will share it (again) here. December 13, 2002….Tom and the Heartbreakers were playing MSG with Jackson Browne opening for them. Perfection! I had bought seats through the Fan Club and got floor seats….Row M, Section 4…it was the 13th row. Mmm…Friday the 13th and another 13? Is this a sign of things to come? I was sitting by a friend, J….I had first been sitting by friends, Caroline and Andrea way up in the front….2nd row. I even got to see a few songs of Jackson’s set before the people who bought those tickets finally came. Okay, back to my seat. It was still amazing to be sitting on the floor of MSG!!! I would always have seats way way up…this was heaven to me. So after Jackson’s set…I go up to talk with my friends up there again. (I also got to give a special someone there a pin for Mike…I thank him very much for getting it to him) They said those people who were sitting there left….sooooo….I go back to J and say let’s go up there. Who knows….maybe they will not come back! So there we were in 2nd row…behind C and A. The lights go down….hey, still sitting here! ‘Ohhhhh….babbbbyyyy”…..it’s Tom….and the Heartbreakers! YAY!! So electric…so intense….so much fun!! We were rocking and dancing…singing and swaying….and…what is that shining on Mike’s lapel? Ahhh, it is the pin I gave him….he was wearing it right there and then! That in itself was the best thing in the world to me. But….there would be more this evening. So, fast forward….I got a backstage pass along with my friend, J. Oh, my goodness…..here we go. We peel back the pass and put them on our chests. Reach a doorway and the guy guarding the entrance looks at us……..nods….okay, we’re in! Going backstage is not what you think it is of going back stage. There are different areas to get through. Some…just arrive at the first and that is it. So there we were…some tables and chairs…..forklifts moving…boxes….equipment…..alot of people standing around and talking. There was a table with a a galvanized tub filled with water and other drinks. We were just standing there for a few minutes when Dana came out. She said to follow her and we did! On the way we saw Scott…and Dana introduced us. He shook my hand and said..”Hi, Beth…nice to meet you.’ Okay, very strange I am not shaking yet, lol. There is Belmont…again introduced and shook his hand. He, too, said nice to meet you, Everyone back here is so friendly! She brought us to another smaller room and said she would be right back…..mingle. Mingle? Lol, I think I must have looked like a deer in the headlights. More people in this room….maybe some famous but I was thinking about that person I was going to be meeting soon. Saw Steve in this room….I told him I came to see the Knobs and that you guys rock, too!! Big smile came to his face and he said I need to come back and see more shows. I do. I still do. Dana comes back to us now….we follow her to another room. A bit bigger. There is a table to the left as soon as you go through the doorway. Filled with food….looked like tunafish and some almost gone grapes along with cut up veggies and things. On the opposite wall is a bank of cabinets and a large screen tv. I see two men sitting on the big brown leather couches. Dana says to Tom…’Tom, I want you to meet two of my NY friends.’ Okay, I am from NJ but I let that one go. Tom stands up and puts out his hand to me….shook my hand and looks right in my eyes and says, ‘Hey, Beth, nice to meet you.’ Okay, I will be honest to say I felt completely numb….I saw he had some ice on his hand and I asked him what happened. Ahh, now I KNOW what happened but my mind just was not cooperating! he was very kind to explain it to me……again. J and I stood there and were kind of silent….it just all seemed so surreal. He said some more things and then we started to go. Walking was a little easier…I was floating. We all have people in our lives that make it special…make it tolerable. Life is hard….I do know that….and the moments we get to forget about things even if just for a bit feeds our soul. We need this music….our souls need it. My heart and my prayers go out to Dana….the family…..Tom’s music family…..my family of fellow fans. Life is just too short….and it is getting shorter with each year. How blessed we all are to have heard this man’s songs….his voice…shared in these shows in some pretty cool venues. God bless you, Tom…..thank you for your music. Thank you.
  23. 3 points
    I can't help wondering if they have enough good tracks left over to make a Mudcrutch 3. It would be such a gift if they did!
  24. 3 points
    btltez

    The Divorce Record

    Hey. Never posted here before but I have been lurking for a long time. What an awesome site and wonderful people. Like everyone else, Tom's passing has affected me deeply. I don't have any words that haven't been said. I've met him, know people close to the Heartbreakers, etc but always was and still is the music for me. This past year has been really hard for me personally, and it was Tom's songs that mostly got me through it. Or, I'm still going through it and his death has just made it all even harder. Thought I would share the ones that hit the closest to home for me.
  25. 3 points
    IndigoGypsy13

    Honoring Tom's birthday

    I will never forget the first time that I saw him. Feb.26, 2003. I was attending the Concert for Artist Rights benefit for the Recording Artist Coalition at the Forum in Los Angeles. Stevie Nicks was on stage. I was already on cloud 9 as it was my first time seeing Stevie apart from Fleetwood Mac. She announced that she had a VERY special guest joining her onstage. Tom Petty walked out. I was stunned. I couldn't believe it! When I was a child, I used to watch all of the Tom Petty and Stevie NIcks videos on MTV. I wondered if they were real people. I was so enchanted with them. They were the Fairy Godmother and Fairy Godfather of Rock n Roll to me. I was lucky to see Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers a few times. Mudcrutch once. I will never forget those shows and what a gift they were. Happy Birthday Tom Petty!
  26. 3 points
    Shelter

    Honoring Tom's birthday

    You are so missed on your birthday, Tom! It should've been such a great one and the beginning on new things to come.. Now it's bookends, memories.. a sad, yet beautiful day. You are in our hearts.
  27. 3 points
    Shelter

    Your prized Petty possessions

    Right! It doesnt get better than that in this life!
  28. 2 points
    I felt like playing some vinyl today so I started to look through some of my Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers collection and I came across this album. I don't think I ever played it before but I put it on the record player today and it sounds amazing! I think it might have been one Johni brought me from England but I'm not sure. Heck, I might have bought it on EBay way back when. It's just so cool and just what I needed today, a little Tom Refugee and The Beach Bums! LOL!!
  29. 2 points
    Soundchecks are all right, still glad they recorded them but don't get too excited! Very good quality show from what I've listened to both in performance and sound quality. Enjoy! https://bootlegkingdom.blogspot.com/2017/10/tom-petty-heartbreakers-19950815.html
  30. 2 points
    11/3/17 TPATH
  31. 2 points
  32. 2 points
    detroitken

    Tour history 1976 - 2017

    March 2,1977...Royal Oak....I believe the billing was for Tom Petty & the LA Heartbreakers...I still have my stub...
  33. 2 points
    Ok, I'm a big fan of Echo. I rate it as the best TPATHB album. I would also rate it the most true and genuine Heartbreakers record in terms of transmiting a human mood at the time of recording onto record without 'music industry hype' or marketing buzz dilution filters that are so ever increasingly harder to transcend. I think it is also a very brave record, maybe not a full exposure of Tom's emotions at the time in terms of divorce issues and trying to make sense of a new reality, but all the same rooted in a genuine human place. There is a rare honesty and believability in this album. Dirt under the finger nails, sleepless nights, quiet private moments of contemplation about what it's all about. Real human feelings. You can't program and create these emotions in the studio, luckily Rick Rubin was there and able to just record them and recognise what was happening naturally and organically. a rare skill in and of itself for any producer to be able to recognise what is happening naturally without artificial interferance. I love this album, I don't see it as a depressing album as some would label it as, hey even the band itself are wrong in rating it as that by all accounts. The honesty transcends into a bigger picture for those who refuse to surrender heart and soul. Genuine human honesty transcends labels and categorisation. Anyway, I may be in an army of one on this, but are there any other Echo disciples out there? My most treasured studio album!
  34. 2 points
    Miami Steve

    Tour history 1976 - 2017

    Thanks for the additions. Found one more for 1978 from that site. 1978 West Coast tour Opening act: David Johansen May 7, 1978 NBC Studios, Burbank, CA taping of the Midnight Special broadcast June 2, 1978 May 11, 1978 Montezuma Hall, SDSU, San Diego, CA May 13, 1978 Freeborn Hall, UC Davis, Davis, CA May 14, 1978 UC Riverside, Riverside, CA June 3, 1978 Stanford Memorial Auditorium, Palo Alto, CA June 5, 1978 Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, Santa Monica, CA June 9, 1978 Chico State Gym, Chico, CA June 10, 1978 Winterland, San Francisco, CA with Earth Quake and David Johansen June 11, 1978 Veterans Memorial, Santa Rosa, CA with Sarah Baker June 14, 1978 Paramount Theatre, Portland, OR June 15, 1978 Commodore Ballroom, Vancouver, Canada Knebworth Festival June 20, 1978 BBC Studios, London Old Grey Whistle Test June 24, 1978 Knebworth Festival, Hertfordshire, England with Genesis, Jefferson Starship, Devo, Brand X, Atlanta Rhythm Section June 27, 1978 Marquee Club, London surprise gig 1978 U.S. tour July 6, 1978 Jacksonville, FL opening for the Patti Smith Group July 7, 1978 Curtis Hixon Hall, Tampa FL opening for the Patti Smith Group July 8, 1978 Miami Jai Alai Fronton, Miami, FL opening for the Patti Smith Group July 12, 1978 Cobo Hall, Detroit, MI opening for Journey July 13, 1978 Music Hall, Cleveland, OH with Derringer July 14, 1978 Palladium, New York, NY with Derringer July 15, 1978 Paramount Theatre, Asbury Park, NJ with U.K. July 16, 1978 Paradise Theater, Boston, MA King Biscuit Flower Hour July 17, 1978 Warner Theater, Washington, D.C. July 18, 1978 Tower Theater, Philadelphia, PA with Mink DeVille July 22, 1978 Cape Cod Coliseum, South Yarmouth, MA opening for the J. Geils Band July 23, 1978 Springfield Civic Center, Springfield, MA opening for the J. Geils Band July 28, 1978 Calderone Concert Hall, Hempstead, NY opening for the J. Geils Band August 1, 1978 Civic Center, Oklahoma City, OK opening for the Kinks August 3, 1978 The Warehouse, New Orleans, LA opening for the Kinks August 5, 1978 Fox Theater, Atlanta, GA opening for the Kinks with Blondie August 6, 1978 Fox Theater, Atlanta, GA opening for the Kinks with Blondie August 13, 1978 Dallas Convention Center, Dallas, TX opening for Kansas September 10, 1978 Opry House, Austin, TX September 14, 1978 Kiel Opera House, St. Louis, MO September 16, 1978 Uptown Theatre, Kansas City, MO September 20, 1978 Memorial Auditorium, Louisville, KY with Walter Egan September 22, 1978 Circle Theater, Indianapolis, IN September 23, 1978 Riviera Theater, Chicago, IL September ??, 1978 State Theatre, Minneapolis, MN Gary Busey joins the band for encores of "Rock and Roll Music" and "I Fought the Law" October ??, 1978 Troubadour, West Hollywood, CA Tom guests with the Knack December 29, 1978 Redding Civic Auditorium, Redding, CA with the Greg Kihn Band December 30, 1978 Winterland, San Francisco, CA with the Greg Kihn Band December 31, 1978 Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, Santa Monica, CA with the Greg Kihn Band (guest Del Shannon)
  35. 2 points
    I wonder if anyone is going to The Largo tonight? I went after Benmont released his album, god what year was that, 2014? It's too early in the morning. It was a wonderful show. Benmont, as you all know, is just amazing! When I met him after the show, he was so warm and charming. I went on the Saturday night that Tom, and all the Heartbreakers were there (except for Ron). I'm sure it will be tough for Benmont to perform for the first time since Tom's passing. If anyone goes, please tell us all about the show.
  36. 2 points
    Rather than flat out "rejecting" the album, I suppose what happened at MCA was "the A&R man said 'I don't hear a single' ". Literally, they did see no hits on FMF as Tom presented it to them! That is almost as absurd as Decca passing on Beatles, imo. However, when he added the decided light weight cover of "Feel a Whole Lot Better" and a few people changed chairs at MCA, then suddenly they DID feel a whole lot better about the prospect. That is actually as weird as it is funny. Not a bad song at all, but seriously... I'm not positive if this is correct, but could it, possibly, be that be while hanging, unsure if the album was gonna be released or not, that he searched for something to push it over the edge, so to speak, that he recorded Waiting For Tonight with The Bangles?? Did I dream this? Then again, the latter track featured a more complete line up of The Heartbreakers, if I'm not mistaken, and then when FMF suddenly got an ok, with the inclusion of FAWLB, there was no time or need to figure out how or if that new song fitted anyway... Also, I always thought Waiting For Tonight originally was penned for a planned TPATH Let Me Up (I've Had Enough) follow up album that got scrapped or put on hold, when Tom steered in the arms of the Traveling Wilburys, a context and an experience I guess you could say FMF was born out of. Not sure if any of this has anything to do with The Heartbreaker's recenting Tom's solo album. Perhaps to some extent it did. To me what makes FMF a solo album is not only the arrangements. As for Wildflowers and to some extent also Highway Companion, I can imagine TPATH versions of the material, that is with a slightly different arrangement and production they could both have been full blown and great band albums. With FMF, I really think there is something intrinsically solo about the whole thing, about the very material. (I mean, in no small ways are the cover shot of FMF a sorta half body remake of the first album, which was, btw, originally labeled as "Tom Petty" rather than "Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers" since the deal was originally his alone). In my mind, Love Is A Long Road is the only song on the album that could be reimagined as a band song, in the traditional Heartbreakers sense. That goes to say that while I can understand what people say about The Heartbreakers (sans Mike) supposedly feeling let down with some of Tom's choices in 1988-1989, leaving them on the outside as it were, I really think that Stan and Ben truly felt the music - both many of the songs and much of how they were realized by Tom and Jeff - was less band oriented and interesting from their perspective. Perhaps this goes for Howie too (although, admittedly, he was per se as much of a session player/singer as a band guy). They probably could appreciate the stunning parade of pop hits that was the album, but they might not have seen much of their own music identity in it. I can imagine they initially - before they all had to play many of the songs every night for the rest of their lives, making them TPATH anyway in a way - did not actually like FMF that much. Not only because they basically weren't on it or because they felt Tom left them hanging, but because it was not really the type of material or production style that they were into. Especially Stan, I'd say. Don't get me wrong, but in terms of his personal musical integrity he was probably quite happy not to be on FMF, as he seemed a bit frustrated about what he had to "act up", as it were, on ITGWO. In short, I think FMF promised to mean a bigger artistic change in Tom than it ended up becoming and I think that put a little bit of a scare on everybody. Save for Mike, for some reason. Perhaps his love for the Running Down A Dream riff made him look past everything else, perhaps he just had trust enough in Tom to stick with it, to ride it out and see what happened, perhaps he really was the only one Tom trusted enough to stay a core part of it. I don't know. But it must have been tricky times for The Heartbreakers. Until the tour went underway, anyway. As a sidenote: It is funny to me, how they - in various ways - seem to mock the whole situation shamelessly in the few video skits they filmed for extra material to the "A Bunch Of Videos and Some Other Stuff" release around this same time. It's hard to be quite sure if Stan was just acting when he butchered that drum machine, or if Howie was perhaps grumpy and bitter for real when he storms off on his bike. Either way, it's fabulous stuff. All that aside, I think there can be no question that a vast majority of the fans REALLY fell in love with this album and this collection of songs, from the start. I think the success speaks for itself, really. There may have been fans recognizing the same dimensional shift that Stan saw, seeing that it was a bit different, perhaps not being totally thrilled about how it seemed to steer away from rock'n'roll a bit. But I think very few of them could dismiss the charm of it all together. Moreover FMF did pull in tons of new fans, and also.. let's not forget.. The combination of that laid back pop style of Tom's songs, Jeff's ideas on sound (like commented on above!), the recent success of Traveling Wilburys, the peak of MTV, all line up like that, with a whiff of skateboards, palm trees, sunshines and boulevards, south Cal and LA style, in 1989 this created the perfect storm in terms of success for Tom. Never before and never since has a Tom Petty album been more fashionable, commercially right-in-time for the big league, and straight out hip. ITGWO did ride the tail on that same wave, so to speak, and Wildflowers was prefect and right in time too, in a slightly different, less sunny way.. But I'd say that 88-95 era was when Tom was the most in-tune with mainstream fashion, most full blown "adult pop" he ever was, and obviously recognized as much himself, keeping the landmarks of this era close to his heart and to his live act all to the very end. We can say whatever we like (and I do) and we can disect other "deeper" or "technical" or even "social" aspects of the music Tom made on FMF, but in short: what's not to like??
  37. 2 points
    Softanimal

    Question of the day 10/24/17

    I only have three concerts to refer to, so it's narrowed down... Going to America! I have always wanted to go to America, and now there was a reason... Getting to see new places and experience something... Getting close to Tom! I was crazily in love with that man. Yeah, that was crazy. Not so much for the music, more for the experience and the thrill of it all.
  38. 2 points
    Shelter

    Dylan covers Petty

    Good question! I'd say that if he was to make an interdimensional chart of 1) Tom Petty songs that he actually knows in enough detail to consider making a rendition, 2) songs that his audience may actually know and appreciate as being a fairly obvious Tom Petty tribute and 3) songs that suit the occasion in terms of general existential character rather than topical or specific themed songs (story songs or songs about love, divorce, greed or what have you) 4) songs that suit his general abilities as a performer (granted he is a genius and can do anything, a rendition still needs to be within certain borders in order for above no 2) to still be an active premise), Well, if he did make such a chart, then one of the points where it would all allign, where all the dimensions meet if you will, would be Learning To Fly, I'm sure. Seems an obvious pick to me. Even more so, when hearing it. I guess another one that Bob might've considered (perhaps deemed too obvious, considering how everybody is doing it already, too boring) would be I Won't Back Down. Had he wanted to make a bit of a "deeper" statement with his tribute, I suppose perhaps "Southern Accents" would have checked most boxes too. Now I can imagine Bob:yfied versions of Free Fallin, American Girl or Refugee, You Don't Know How it Feels or even Runnin Down a Dream too, perhaps Don't Come Around Here No More... yeah, indeed most of the "core" hits. But, those wouldn't likely have been as effective in this case - and most of them not as good, I guess - for various reasons stated above. On the other hand, countless lesser known songs of Tom's would probably be very well suited for Bob to rework on this occasion - some of which he may even know in some detail, who knows - but most of those would be songs - while a dream for someone like me, to hear him do* - would not be as obvious to his audience. ---- * I would love to hear Bob do No Second Thoughts, Letting You Go, Walls, Dreamville, I Forgive It All... perhaps.. Can't Stop The Sun, Good Enough.. among many others... Songs like Dark of The Sun, Echo, Lost Children, Saving Grace or Even The Losers would be great with Bob, if not necessarily in a heartfelt context like this tribute. On the other hand, Bob is known to have played "Restelss Farewell" on Frank Sinatra's 80s birthday, so decorum is always relative to creativity and.. well.. jocularity.. when it comes to Bob.
  39. 2 points
    Here's Lucinda and Tom at one of the Hollywood Bowl Shows:
  40. 2 points
    * First song (Kings Highway) 00:35 - 03:50 had to be cut due to copyright. You can watch it on the TP&TH official channel at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OdqDe... * At last an excellent quality YouTube video for Take The Highway LIVE. This is terrific stuff! Enjoy!
  41. 2 points
    That was hilarious and sad at the same time. They are both gone now.
  42. 2 points
    Yeah, me too..! I suppose 9 tracks in the vault is most likely enough in terms of minutes. And according to what's been said, it's quality tracks too. Question is if they are a good mix stylewise to form an album proper? And if the other guys are prepared to make that "journey" again. (Because even without a tour, releasing an album is some kinda journey). Perhaps, in time they are. Let's hope so, cause I am always eager to hear anything Mudcrutch and would feel really sad if they decide to leave it on the shelf. I would love to get those 9 tracks at some point. And perhaps there is some odd left over piece from the first sessions too. I know there are that bonus song "Special Place" for example, that are not properly released for example, so maybe some kinda of "Mudcrutch - All The Rest" is in the stars, who knows? I for one would love for at least a "Live EP Vol 2", from the last tour!
  43. 2 points
    bonddm

    Tom's speech @ Musicares

    Hopefully we’ll eventually see a Blu/DVD release of this show.
  44. 2 points
    I have got my Rickenbacker, bought online many years ago, because I wanted to know what it felt like, having such a guitar in my arms. And then there is a "Long After Dark" LP cover, signed by mr. Petty himself. My two most valued items.
  45. 2 points
    fan4petty

    Honoring Tom's birthday

    Cool news story I just stumbled upon. https://www.avclub.com/vampires-walked-through-the-valley-last-night-in-honor-1819725703
  46. 2 points
    asakitten

    Your prized Petty possessions

    Most prized possession for me is the memories of concerts shared with my daughter. As for physical possessions the music and videos that I've got from the people on this site. Thanks for sharing.
  47. 2 points
    fan4petty

    Honoring Tom's birthday

    Blowing out the candles. Hard to see.
  48. 2 points
    Liberty

    Your prized Petty possessions

    I have a Lazer Disc of A Bunch of Videos and Other Stuff. LOL! My record collection. And a signed CD insert of Benmont Tench's album (but I only got it because I was one of the first 50 to order).
  49. 2 points
    Bits of info are coming out... Very few people beyond the Heartbreakers' immediate circle knew that Petty was suffering, at each gig, from a hairline fracture in his left hip, which he planned to deal with after the tour. "I don't know how it happened," says his longtime manager Tony Dimitriades. "I don't think he even knew when it happened." At one point, Dimitriades told Petty, "You can't tour like that." The singer responded, "Why not? I'll do it in a chair if I have to."
  50. 2 points
    I had to do something. No regrets. Peace Love and Petty!
×