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  2. nurktwin

    Guitar

    Yes, that one caught my eye too!
  3. nurktwin

    Happy Birthday Paul McCartney

    I know what you mean Tom, I've seen Paul about 50 times since 1976 and I get tears in my eyes everytime. I'm hoping he tours around here again so I can take my daughter to see him.
  4. I agree with Tomfest. Being a drummer, I once told a guitarist how to play a part and even though he didn't say anything, I could tell he was pissed. I won't make that mistake again! We all have thoughts and ideas floating around in our heads of how a song should sound and be played, but getting that point across to the other members can be a bit of a problem without hurting their feelings. The longer you know your bandmates, the easier it is to blurt out "play it this way" and that causes trouble. Think of The Beatles film "Let it be" when Paul tells George how to play a part.
  5. Today
  6. TomFest

    Happy Birthday Paul McCartney

    Happy Birthday, Sir Paul! I saw him when he was 63 and hoped he'd play "When I'm 64", but no. I can't really explain it, but it was all I could do to not cry.
  7. TomFest

    Guitar

    I don't, but I have been looking at this one...... https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/EDJBANGH--epiphone-limited-edition-joe-bonamassa-1958-amos-korina-flying-v-antique-natural
  8. I've been playing with the same core group of guys - bass, drums, and me on guitar - for about 25 years, with others floating in and out of the band over that time. I had the experience of trying to show the other guitarist in the band at the time - a part that I wanted him to play. He quit the band after that day. He just never came back, or answered any of my attempts to reach him. And this was a friend that I had previously worked with, played golf with, took trips with. I didn't really understand why he left, but I decided I was never again going to instruct anyone on what to play.
  9. Shelter

    On 1993’s Greatest Hits

    At least I suppose the theory works in reverse... That is, I'd say that, since the port of entry - if you actually enter - will always hold a somewhat special place to you, simply because it's your point of discovery, it's not likely to end up your least favorite. After all, sometimes there are a virtual goldmine to be found once you start explore, there might even be new worlds and new highs. Other times there are more of an equal charm that caught you in the first place. Yet other times, there's not much there to level the premiere experience and it will indeed keep it's position on top. But I suppose all I can say is that even if your first love doesn't always remain your most pure and passionate - rarely, if indeed ever, does it end up being a complete throw away. Although, I guess even that could happen.
  10. nurktwin

    Classic Rock Video of the Day II

    6/20/18 The Who
  11. Big Blue Sky

    On 1993’s Greatest Hits

    Yes! But also no! (Hi, I'm new ) My memory is a bit selective - I guess I remember the cool / good albums I love and quietly forget about the weaker ones. Hahaha. The no part is that I adore music from every single album that TPATH released, so I kept on being excited and digging their music and no one track or album has special stand-out value. Which is my favourite album? Which is my favourite toe? The yes part is the formative nature of some music. So yeah, those musicians and those albums are really special. Obviously. It got in deep and stayed. When we were really young, my best friend's mum and dad played us music they loved and said things like "music doesn't stop being good after a year or so". I'm so grateful for their influence on my musical taste -a wonderful gift that has lasted years and years. As Tom Petty said: I have a theory, if a song is good, it will endure. I still look out for copies of albums that were in their vinyl collection and don't even always know how clearly and deeply I know those songs. For example, when I heard TPATH singing Friend of the Devil I was thinking great tune ...until that early part of me said "Hang on, why's he saying 'slicked back all my hair?' That ain't right." So I checked and yep, the Dead sang 'vanished into the air'. I didn't know I knew that!!! Anyway, these babies are some of those from the edge of my memory - you can see where it all went so wrong so early hahaha. Thanks! All Beatles Some Rolling Stones (Dead Flowers - even though I didn't realise what it might be about and, uh, no-one explained) Dylan (1960s) especially when he's using his rich and resonate voice. Listen to "Blue Moon" on YouTube and then talk to me about whether the man could sing. the Dead (American Beauty) the Doors (Morrison Hotel) Eric Clapton's guitar Little Wing ... every 5year old loves dancing around singing about butterflies and zebras The Band (Music From Big Pink, Basement Tapes, Stagefright and the one we call the Brown album though technically it's "The Band"). Last Waltz (again, obviously). ...ran on a hilltop chasin a pack of wild geese the Byrds (Sweetheart of the Rodeo) ....not out of spite nor anger but simply cos it's true Joan Baez Joni Mitchell but Hendrix was too much too complex for my little kid brain and is still an acquired taste. I guess I might be only person who kinda likes Dylan's All Along the Watchtower more than Hendrix's version.
  12. MuddyandMagnolia

    Photo of the Day Part III

    Thank you, I see what you mean now, in my defense I was on my iPhone 6 at the time and said I couldn't really see. I agree that an artist should always be paid a fair price for their work, however, like I said, I can't afford a lot of expensive prints, funny enough I have not been able to even get one from the Archive. So, having said that, I appreciate all the artists, photographers, and people here who DON'T mind sharing high quality images of Tom without watermarks. Frankly, I'm still paying on my custom Tom Petty artwork ... so no more indulgences for me for awhile! (picture later)
  13. Hi. Interesting question... Well, they have talked about how in some albums they've started with an idea (a musical riff or a rhythm). The process seems to be that everyone in the group in the room listens to it and creates their own music so they hear the piece build and evolve within a short time. But if they're struggling too much, they leave it and go to something else. I think that's possible for Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers because they are (oh gawd, were, gulp) all sensational musicians, not 'cos it's an easy musical process. Sensational. On the other hand there are the albums where they have worked off relatively detailed demos and built up something more complex. And then there are times when people are just kinda told "play these notes like this at this point." Sure, can see why that'd be a bit frustrating for the players' egos: "What am I to you - a paid session musician?" But great for the one guiding the process, as they'd be thinking in a whole different way - with the whole rich complex sound singing in their head that they really want to catch on tape: "Get the bass and drum in the pocket and then those opening piano notes, yeah, and now that great guitar sound. Okay!" So they aren't doing it that way just to annoy, hurt or suppress the others in the band, are they? Um, I think any creative process is gonna involve people's ideas - even if we haven't been in a studio I guess we've all been in groups of people trying to make decisions. People's personalities in a group are so complex and shared leadership is a subtle thing. The loudest voices aren't the only ones in the room and it's a good idea to make it safe/cool for everyone to contribute in a diverse range of ideas. At other times, an idea has momentum and it's most constructive for everyone to to nurture it, run with it for a while - and not be chipping in with other off-topic ideas. Or ya get side-eye or eye roll Time and place? Just cos an idea's good doesn't mean someone needs to shout it out and make everyone else listen right then and there... I'm thinking that where there's lots of goodwill people are going to work together well and enjoy the process Whether those processes make quality music is another issue.
  14. Yesterday
  15. MaryJanes2ndLastDance

    Covers of Tom Petty songs

    All Or Nothing, give 'em a view. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=deKkka5qPo0
  16. MaryJanes2ndLastDance

    The Extended Jam Extravaganza Thread

    I go back and forth on the original song sometimes I like it other times I don't but I do enjoy this live version, what an unexpected treat for people at those shows. I think it also goes for whatever reason, a lot of their own deep catalog was left alone, sure some nice ones were pulled out during that run of shows but again, why play a cover from Tom's other band instead of their own material? However, they did play it and it's quite a nice moody piece live. The band excelled at these midtempo groove songs, particularly live. My impression is while the band always had a long number or two in concert, the number of songs they extended and the degree to which they did went up considerably with the ITGWO tour and with Wildflowers on and were more prone to jam on their own numbers a bit more than covers. cheers
  17. I read a Frank Black interview where to paraphrase he noted that if he told someone exactly how to play a part they'd either a) agree and play it the way they were anyway b)get frustrated at not being able to do what he wanted specifically and play it their way anyway I think he also said that as long as they could play he was more interested in the personality of the person in the band then their specific skill level; is this someone he could picture hanging out with for great amounts of time etc. So...when you've been in band situations do you give specific instructions to a player or have received the same? Do you think it's better to just accept how they play and incorporate that into the music? Tying this into TPATH, I wonder how much of this did Stan's head in a bit in the studio, expecting him to do something a certain exact way instead of letting him do his own version of that? Also, I think I read somewhere that during the recording of Last Dance With Mary Jane they wanted him to do a different style and he went ahead and did what he thought was best and well...history speaks for itself! Thoughts on any of the above?
  18. Big Blue Sky

    Photo of the Day Part III

    Yeah alright! Glad you like it too! So the reason I'm thinking those might be corduroy pants like in You Wreck Me? If you look on a big screen, there's some detail. There are narrow vertical stripes of light and shade up and down the leg, which is how needle-cord corduroy fabric looks. By contrast, blue jeans denim has that diagonal weave. So, yeah, for me that looks like our man's wearing needle-cord jeans. It's nice the photographer can earn that kind of money from their creative work. I have bought expensive prints from archives before as gifts. But for the purpose of sharing images with others in this kind of context, I think a scanned image is ethically okay - and increases the possibility that someone will maybe see it and then buy a print. Those high-quality reprints are more for framing on the wall while these are for your pin board (goober board) - or my fridge door - hahaha.
  19. MaryJanes2ndLastDance

    On 1993’s Greatest Hits

    I'm amazed a song added to the Greatest Hits became one! I think it's one of their best numbers. What an interesting occurrence. cheers
  20. MuddyandMagnolia

    Photo of the Day Part III

    HAHA I LOVE IT!! You've made my day! Makes me crave boiled peanuts I am addicted to pictures, so I love meeting someone who seems to collect the same. I would love to send you a Goober picture of Steve Stills, Mr. Louisiana.
  21. MuddyandMagnolia

    Photo of the Day Part III

    DAGNABBIT HOT DOG! BLUE, Szafira (teach me all how to speak that later) YOU ARE ROCKSTARS!! Lemme tell you why, Ebet was going to charge me $300.00 for an 8x10 copy, she doesn't do digital without a similar watermark - yeah my art hasn't taken off so well where I could afford such a luxury and if any of you Goober Gals and Guys want a 30x40 print - $3000.00 pocket change. In fact Blue you've done one better, it ain't the same photo, I'm pretty sure those are blue jeans but my eyes ain't that great haha ... AND you reminded me I have to post my own magazine scans at the archives if they don't already have them ... hm, in fact I should dedicate a day to it ... but I digress. By the way Blue, the photo attached perfectly fine in .PDF form, VENI VIDI ARRIPUI (I came, I saw, I took) ❤️ TTFN
  22. I find this story fairly fascinating and half expect this will be turned into a movie at some point soon, however I almost doubt people would believe it. So apparently this punk rocker from France disappeared in 1988 after robbing a bank with his bandmates, he was on the run and then declared dead in 2010, after 28 years he turned himself in and walked away with the equivalent of nearly 3 million dollars and a suspended sentence. I'm a bit surprised not to hear too much about this. From a seprate page I found out he got a suspended sentence of 5 years and is returning to Barcelona to be with his family (https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/06/06/french-punk-rocker-gets-suspended-sentence-30-years-run-2m-bank/) I keep hoping Jim Morrison will show up in similar fashion someday soon. https://www.bbc.com/news/stories-44374766 A trial begins on Wednesday 6 June in the southern French city of Toulouse involving a bank heist, the punk music movement that swept Europe in the early 1980s and a man who came back from the dead. Chris Bockman reports on an unlikely comeback. One of France's most well-known criminal lawyers, Christian Etelin, was sitting at his desk late at night last November contemplating retirement, when he received a phone call that stunned him. First of all, because the caller had been declared dead years ago - and secondly, because it involved a brash armed robbery that occurred nearly 30 years ago. The voice on the other end of the phone was that of Gilles Bertin - a one-time nihilist punk singer with a Bordeaux Group called Camera Silens with a heavy following amongst anarchists and extreme left-wing youths who thought there was no future, for them at least. Britain had Sid Vicious and the Sex Pistols - Gilles Bertin was France's equivalent. Image copyrightGETTY IMAGES Image captionChristian Etelin is a high-profile criminal lawyer In the late 1980s the group and their hangers-on were destitute, despite their success, and addicted to drugs. Several had been infected with the HIV virus after sharing contaminated heroin syringes. They figured they didn't have long to live, so they decided to go out with a bang, mount a massive armed robbery and then blow it all before they died. And that's exactly what some of the band members did - they stole 12 million francs (nearly 2 million euros) from a Brinks deposit in Toulouse - a small fortune at the time. They even - apparently - called the local newspaper afterwards boasting of their feat. No-one was injured in the robbery and the police quickly realised they were dealing with amateurs. All were caught within a year except one suspect, Gilles Bertin. Hardly any of the money was retrieved and some of the anarchist robbers, already very sick, died from AIDS-related symptoms. The others, after spending a brief time in jail, returned to obscurity and nine-to-five jobs. Image copyrightJEAN ZINDEL Image captionGilles Bertin on stage in 1984 at the Chaos Festival in Orléans Gilles Bertin received a 10-year sentence in his absence and as the years passed, the robbery and punk movement faded from view. The singer/convicted armed robber was declared dead. His family - including his son born during those wild years in Bordeaux - had never heard from him again. And yet he is very much alive when I meet him at a crowded ancient brasserie called the Cafe de la Concorde for lunch in the heart of Toulouse. Tall with shaggy hair and blind in one eye - a consequence of hepatitis caused by drug use - he is incredibly polite and shy. He tells me a little about those 28 years on the run and why he has returned. Image captionGilles Bertin in a cafe in Toulouse - he is reluctant to pose for the cameras After the robbery, he was literally carrying bags of banknotes and he headed to Portugal, where he opened a record store - all paid for in cash, of course. Occasionally a travelling French music fan would recognise him but he would deny it was him. Every time he saw a car with French number plates outside the store he was convinced he was being monitored or followed. After 10 years of running the shop he thought the French police were really on his tracks this time and he headed to Barcelona with his Spanish girlfriend. Her family ran a bar and he became the barman. They had a child. Only his girlfriend knew about his background - to everyone else he was a man with no past. But he told me that when he was close to death with hepatitis and was saved by hospital staff in Barcelona free of charge, no questions asked, because he had no documents, it was the turning point - time to confront his past and be honest with his son. His life had been saved, while he had provided nothing for society. "I realised I had to tell the truth and come clean about my past," he says. Hence that phone call to the lawyer. He crossed the border by train to Toulouse and, with his lawyer, turned himself in at police headquarters. While he admits he is nervous with the court date looming, he nevertheless feels a burden has been lifted. "This is the final stage of a long ordeal that I have to go through," he says. "However, I am anxious, it gives me vertigo thinking about it especially as I know I risk a 20-year prison sentence. "But I am really doing this for my seven-year-old son. He still doesn't really understand what I did during my nearly 30 years on the run - but he needs to know." Expecting to be jailed immediately, to his complete surprise he found he could remain free until his trial - where he will plead guilty. He says the decision not to imprison him has made him even more angry with himself for what he did. Image copyrightAFP Image captionGilles Bertin in a 1988 police mugshot But if some people think his past is romantic he wants to make it clear he would never want to have the life he had again. "There was nothing romantic about what I did," he says. "In hiding, unable to talk about yourself or to people from your past, including my son, constantly on the look-out in case the authorities find you - and on top of that I was seriously ill." For three decades, he says, he lived a lie, with shame. He constantly felt like a hunted animal, living in permanent paranoia. As he awaits trial he's writing about his experience on the run and has even reunited with his other son, now 30 years old. He hopes he can convince the judge that he has changed. "Back in the late 70s and early 80s I was an angry young man, a nihilist, an anarchist on a destructive path and in revolt against society. You have to understand the context back then," he says. "I made mistakes but I am not that same person now - at 57 I am more mature and have nothing to do with that period in my life." Since his return from the dead, Bertin has re-established contact with some of the ex-band members (and Brinks robbery associates) who are still alive - many aren't. One now drives a bus, another is an orderly on a hospital ward. Does he still listen to his old music? He winces and says his music back then was appalling - these days he listens to soul. If he avoids a jail sentence he will return to Barcelona, but no longer live undercover. "Hopefully I will be able to explain to my son the choices that I made back then." He admits he finds the media interest in his life "a little overwhelming". When it comes to the Brinks money, he insists he spent it all a very long time ago. As for his 74-year-old lawyer Christian Etelin, who has defended convicted far-left terrorists, Islamic fanatics and gangsters all his life - he decided to put off retirement. This was a case he just couldn't let go.
  23. nobodyinparticular

    Random Thoughts Thread

    Er....Okay then. Onto other subjects: Is that a guitar in your pocket or are you just happy to see me?
  24. Shelter

    Random Thoughts Thread

    Just a random thought, really. Just that.. Truth exists, no matter what the top percentile tries to tell you. And an ugly truth it is, too.
  25. SG

    Gretsch soundhole cover

    Cool you're into Gretsches!! They got a sound like no other.
  26. SG

    Photo of the Day Part III

    Hey hey! Oh I LOVE that shocked Tom with the Ricky - that is a hoot! Yep the "Goober Wall" does help me in the art studio... it helps to lessen the pressure to do or achieve and just let the muse in & see what it brings. I've got everybody on that wall from John Lee Hooker and Buddy Guy, Tom, Mike, Emo Phillips, Picasso and George Vanderbilt (he built the Biltmore House in Asheville NC and was so rich - but he was a major Goober too.) Look here, this is part of the Wall bulletin board: Tom top right, Mike top center, on the top right George Vanderbilt acting like a goober while his friends pose properly. Bottom row, left: John Lee Hooker who has obviously said something to set Buddy Guy into fits of laughter, dear Emo Phillips who is one of my favorite comedians, Emo again bottom right with my friend Teresa, and in the middle on the right is John Singer Sargent, my favorite portrait artist of all time who played piano when he was trying to stir the muse to paint... and ole JSS was a goober too! Gotta love it. Enjoy!
  27. nurktwin

    Happy Birthday Paul McCartney

    I've always found it fascinating that The Beatles were born between 1940 and 1943 when England was being bombed during WW2 and most of the country was in rubles during their childhood, but somehow grew into teenagers with a sense of humor that carried on from their 1st recordings and movie til today. I think I can safely say, there will NEVER be a band as big as The Beatles again. The pressure they handled would collapse any band today, and destroyed most bands after The Beatles. I personally know a band that signed with Capitol Records and had 1 #1 hit and became more famous in Japan than the USA. They couldn't handle the fame and broke up like many others. The humor of The Beatles is as famous as their music and the world is a better place because of it. They WILL live on forever!!
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