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Shelter

2017 Tour Trail - memories, pics, songs played

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On July 24, 2017 at 6:01 PM, Shelter said:

^ true that. too bad most people will not likely ever know. and the less tpath live shows becomes about the music, the less people will know the magnitude of the genius wasted.

Shelter, I can't believe you're still going on about the set list. Jeez, give it a rest. 

 
Don't you know that before every show Tom gets his mojo going? He asks the crowd to make a lot of noise! Not the song, ha ha, why play that it was never a hit, no, I meant, just a lot of whoopin' and hollering. It's important because they're going to drop the needle on records across their entire career! Not just the solo albums, that would be silly. Tom said it himself, they can bust out anything on this tour and they just might...! Seriously, you never know...
 
Oh and they're taking requests, too. Not from the audience, ha ha ha, no don't be stupid. Tom's taking requests from himself. Oh, not requests, plural, just a request to play Walls. But c'mon...that counts! He requests it every show. 
 
As for your hope of them playing You and I Will Meet Again, don't you know that there are only three songs that count from that album, Learning to Fly, Into the Great Wide Open and Learning To Fly acoustic sing along version?
 
The crowds love the concerts, all the reports from official sites and magazines have noted how Tom and the fellas won't back down and conclude the evening with American Girl. Heck, maybe they'll even play the same show three nights in a row in Los Angeles! It can't get more rockin' than that. And Tom wears a suit.
 
Don't you know they play an entire 18 to 19 songs...in the same night! No, there's nothing one could reasonably be disappointed about, Shelter.
 
Remember, Tom works hard to please the audience, it takes a lot to play the same chords in the same songs in the same order every night and to keep printing up the same set list for every show except for changing the location and date.  Remember, no one's coming to a TPATH show for...shudder...the unexpected. Not with all those groovy lights and backdrops to look at.
 
Remember, you don't know how it feels to be Tom, having to maintain a tight grip on talented musicians while conducting Steve; don't want Benmont to get any funny ideas about mixing things up, that could throw off a lighting cue and then what would happen? 
 
Good thing we'll never have to find out...! 
 
Remember, when it comes to the live show, it's not about Something Good Coming but more about Good Enough. Why strive for something more? 
 
I'm sure you now see the error of your ways...
 
 
 

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Right. Silly me. Put like that, it DOES seem like a risky and ugly business to put real talent to real use and inspiration, in times like ours. You're absolutely right. Let's all stay shallow and bleak, content with the key words being duly worshipped anyway.. ugly business. Thanks for straighten me out. My apologies.

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On 7/27/2017 at 7:19 PM, martin03345 said:

Place holds 20k plus, it doesn't have anything to do with size

Klipsch in Noblesville/Indy holds like 25K and it was full to the max.
I read on a FB review of Klipsh/TP Concert that people were so packed up in the lawn that guys were just peeing where ever because they couldn't push their way out (or didn't want to, ugh) to find a portapotty.

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I skimmed this article, not sure what to make of it. This part at the ending stood out to me, which I disagree with, TPATH's music was never this to me:

http://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/tom-petty-proud-pain

Tom Petty’s music, so adept at bringing pleasure to so many people across so many years, had become a cultural signifier for the national moment in a way I felt quite sure he never imagined or intended. The powerful, angry songs had made Petty an accidental bard of white resentment. There, in Baltimore, he was making American Grievance Rock.

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Grievance or not, by whom and for what, tonight another leg of this tour will be kicked off (what?!) and here's hoping it will be an exciting and fun one and that we'll see lots of activity in the TPATH community in the upcoming weeks!   

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On 8/10/2017 at 11:54 PM, MaryJanes2ndLastDance said:

I skimmed this article, not sure what to make of it. This part at the ending stood out to me, which I disagree with, TPATH's music was never this to me:

http://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/tom-petty-proud-pain

Tom Petty’s music, so adept at bringing pleasure to so many people across so many years, had become a cultural signifier for the national moment in a way I felt quite sure he never imagined or intended. The powerful, angry songs had made Petty an accidental bard of white resentment. There, in Baltimore, he was making American Grievance Rock.

I have a hard time agreeing with this statement too, but I don't totally disagree with it.
Funny, it reminds me of how so many people saw Bob Dylan's early music as a sort of "voice of the people," as protest songs, etc...
Yet, he totally denied most of it and refused to play at sort of rally/protests.

I think there are a lot of TP songs that can be interpreted as frustration with the socio-political climate. 
And I don't just mean the obvious Last DJ stuff. From the early stuff to the current stuff.
Possibly anything from "Anything that's Rock and Roll"... to "Forgotten Man," "Shadow People," and "Burnt Out Town."
I recall an interview about Hypnotic Eye where Tom commented on how it seemed his songs were lyrically leaning to something darker and more cynical, but he reassured that notion by saying that the current time in his life was more relaxed and hopeful.
I think, in most of his lyrics, there's a balanced amount of hope and cynicism, positive energy and frustration.
Do I think that the more cynical songs are "American Grievance Rock"? No.
Do I think the writer of this article was reaching for something unique? Yeah, probably.

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On 8/10/2017 at 11:54 PM, MaryJanes2ndLastDance said:

I skimmed this article, not sure what to make of it. This part at the ending stood out to me, which I disagree with, TPATH's music was never this to me:

http://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/tom-petty-proud-pain

Tom Petty’s music, so adept at bringing pleasure to so many people across so many years, had become a cultural signifier for the national moment in a way I felt quite sure he never imagined or intended. The powerful, angry songs had made Petty an accidental bard of white resentment. There, in Baltimore, he was making American Grievance Rock.

I have a hard time agreeing with this statement too, but I don't totally disagree with it.
Funny, it reminds me of how so many people saw Bob Dylan's early music as a sort of "voice of the people," as protest songs, etc...
Yet, he totally denied most of it and refused to play at sort of rally/protests.

I think there are a lot of TP songs that can be interpreted as frustration with the socio-political climate. 
And I don't just mean the obvious Last DJ stuff. From the early stuff to the current stuff.
Possibly anything from "Anything that's Rock and Roll"... to "Forgotten Man," "Shadow People," and "Burnt Out Town."
I recall an interview about Hypnotic Eye where Tom commented on how it seemed his songs were lyrically leaning to something darker and more cynical, but he reassured that notion by saying that the current time in his life was more relaxed and hopeful.
I think, in most of his lyrics, there's a balanced amount of hope and cynicism, positive energy and frustration.
Do I think that the more cynical songs are "American Grievance Rock"? No.
Do I think the writer of this article was reaching for something unique? Yeah, probably.

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3 hours ago, Liberty said:

I have a hard time agreeing with this statement too, but I don't totally disagree with it.
Funny, it reminds me of how so many people saw Bob Dylan's early music as a sort of "voice of the people," as protest songs, etc...
Yet, he totally denied most of it and refused to play at sort of rally/protests.

I think there are a lot of TP songs that can be interpreted as frustration with the socio-political climate. 
And I don't just mean the obvious Last DJ stuff. From the early stuff to the current stuff.
Possibly anything from "Anything that's Rock and Roll"... to "Forgotten Man," "Shadow People," and "Burnt Out Town."
I recall an interview about Hypnotic Eye where Tom commented on how it seemed his songs were lyrically leaning to something darker and more cynical, but he reassured that notion by saying that the current time in his life was more relaxed and hopeful.
I think, in most of his lyrics, there's a balanced amount of hope and cynicism, positive energy and frustration.
Do I think that the more cynical songs are "American Grievance Rock"? No.
Do I think the writer of this article was reaching for something unique? Yeah, probably.

Interesting points. Make a lot of sense, right. Thanks for sharing!

As for that article.. it may just be me, but it seems to imply a paradox of sorts. Here are the underlying observations - from Baltimore, of all places! - of what can be read as a white, supposedly resentful, maybe bitter, perhaps Trump supporting crowd, all digging TP for his unique voice (both as a lyricist and an actual voice), identyfying with his songs, thinking he tells their story, longing back to better days. Yet, while lots of statements and catchy and clever one liners can be found in TP songs, the lot of them are of a mostly general, perhaps philosophical reflextions type, aphorisms if you like. Lyrical tidbits and atmospheres that many people, for many different reasons can relate to and appreciate for their insight, beauty or pure entertainment value. ("If you don't run, you rust." "Most things I worry about, never happen anyway".) On a strictly ethnic, religious, economic, environmental - or generally political - level, I'd say that most things found inside the life work of TP writing, would/should be rather counter instinctive messages to a following like the one so sneakily hinted at in the article. He may agree some things were better in the past, but what things and for what reasons are other things worse today? Well, that is another matter.

See, TP may be conservative, on a practical, nostalgia hued level - those were the days when people heard rock music on the radio, bought records and could actually sit down and focus enough to listen to it. And so on. He may be on about morals too, yeah, the brighter and darker sides in all of us. However. It's obvious that the message of Shadow People is deeper and more complex, when he sings of someone that "carries a gun" for his country, it's not exactly pure undisguised praise. It's not the right type of pride being voiced here, am I right? It's not a song of returning to the wild west ethos of the past. ("What are we fighting for?") Or a song sponsored by the NRA. Rather, this may be a song supposed to say something more general about fear, fear in individuals and fear in our society, and that an augmented isolation, greed, racism, alienation, moral relativism, sectarianism, violence and ultimately just more fear in society will not lead to a good future. This may be politcs, by all means, but not exactly the type of politics the white resentful shadow people out there in front of the stage (as mentioned in the article), would necessarily like it to be. As for Burned Out Town - too bad he didn't play that one in Baltimore! That is arguebly less complex and more straight messaged - saying a lot of things that would sting rather than arouse any believer in a country run by Trump logic and Trump economics. It may be the case that TP has got his very own case of "Born In The USA" here, where people just hear what they want to hear and make asses of themselves in the process. Ok, some songs or lines can be literally taken to mean anything or stand for all kinds of worldviews and politcal agendas (case in point - I Won't Back Down, a song so lyrically universal that it's pointless, and brilliant), but in most cases there is an underlying moral current and direction that just can't be hijacked any old way. At least that's how I see it. 

So, basically, what I'm saying here, and what I find to be the paradox of the article - to the extent that it's on to something, in the first place (which is probably without a doubt) - is the deep irony of how all these "ordinary" people, supposedly grooving to the message of TP songs, are really not the "forgotten men" they identify with. Rather they are the "forgetting men", forgetting to listen, forgetting to think and, if we are lucky, forgetting to act.

Meanwhile, somewhere in Baltimore, out in the cold, holding their hands out, over a fire in a can - to paint a somwhat pathetically symbolic and pun-reaking picture - there are the non TP fan, but let's quickly forget who that may be and why, shall we. Besides, how could someone like that even afford the ticket? The article writer must surely be delusional to forget to take that into consideration. Let's just pity the Petty audience pity itself, shall we. A pitiful sentence, that. And a pitiful task. 

Seriously. To end this essay. TP may not, by a long shot, be as outspoken "protester" as was Bob Dylan in 1963, but he may also not be all that fitting as an idol for people and forces that I think that New Yorker article hits at, innocent and steeped in nostalgia as they are, deliberatly or not. I am not sure, actually, whether the article is meant to be praise, reflection or if it rather falls bluntly into a category that may be called "guilt by association".. I'm not sure, but I think it may be a bit rich and a bit off the mark.

Now, how that for spending time, energy (and words!) on the TP community? Morally or politcally, you may find me dubious. But you can't say I don't try. :) 

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