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2017 Tour Trail - memories, pics, songs played

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I've seen the band many times since 1999 saw him in st.paul  i would consider rockin around with you, crawling back to you, wildflowers, forgotten man, you got lucky, walls, I should have known although it has been a staple since mojo lesser played songs, other 12 have certainly been well played.  the two songs I don't understand are it's good to be king (I understand they want a jam song but do good enough or I can see I should have known it becoming a total jam song.)  I also feel I have heard your so bad more times than I need,  The other ten core songs I understand why they play them and still enjoy them a ton and love the audience reaction and interaction around them.  I wish they would play longer and closer to the first show   where they played american dream plan b and something good coming or new orleans where they threw in swinging and good enough, a couple more rare songs deffinitly helps.  Having said I had a blast did not sense mike belmont or any of the band was borred as people seem to insinuate from time to time.  The audience was standing 16000 on their feet all night   Also I've read 3 somewhat less favorable reviews this tour by critics and they didn't want more rareties each case was why didn't they play INSERT this greatest hit.

 

Lastly if I have learned that anything Tom says should be taken with a grain of salt check his quotes before every tour.  If they are playing big crowds it will be 10 greatest hits and 8 or 9 other songs. i LEARNED THAT AND ENJOY IF FOR THE GREAT SHOW IT IS, THEY ARE NOT GOING TO TOUR FOR EVER SO I SOAK IT IN AND APPRECIATE WHEN I GET TO SEE THEM.  One last thing if people want the rare cuts no greatest hits wait for the small shows, I wish they would do one arena show and one or two small shows in each city but they are not going to play to 16000 people in arenas and not play the greatest hits. 

 

 

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Thanks for the review Billy the Kidd.

1 hour ago, billy the kid said:

if I have learned that anything Tom says should be taken with a grain of salt check his quotes before every tour.

 Yes, but it begs the questions, why does he say them? How could he possibly think that any of his tours have ever lived up to his comments? I think everyone was expecting greatest hits, and are actually surprised at some of the big ones not being played. It's a weird tour in my opinion, if nothing else too much WF. Oh well.

There's a whole Echo show from 99 you might enjoy:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5p1Qj-ypFE

 

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On 6/14/2017 at 4:22 PM, Mudcrutch said:

I always admire that they travel with the good stuff. And it's all vintage. 

I took my son who's a guitarist and he's not a big fan but he liked all the guitars and the solos, especially when they zoomed in on the big video screen.  I mentioned that I thought Tom and Mike shared some of the guitars because I've seen pictures of them with the same guitar but then I wondered if they each have their own, two of each model.  They were both playing Thunderbirds during one song.  Anyone know?

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On 6/15/2017 at 3:13 AM, Shelter said:

 

Can't believe there isn't more Farmers, going to more shows, having more things to say about this tour!? I would love to read more about your experiences on the road and with various aspects of it all. Come on now.. I know you can all do a lot better than most "professional" reviewers! Plus you have the insight and knowledge of the subject most pro writers lack. More content here, please!!

 

 

Okay Shelter. I'll put out ;)
...
I saw TPHB in Indy and Cincy this year. As far as venues go, US Bank Arena in Cincy is far superior to the jumbled-up Klipsch.
They played very similar sets both nights, and I was happy to hear "You Got Lucky" and songs from Wildflowers, etc.
Obviously, when a song wasn't a "hit," a lot of people went out to get a beer/relieve themselves, etc. (So, during "Walls," "Forgotten Man," etc).
I had four guys who looked like some bigwig bankers who just got off work in downtown Cincy standing in front of me. Thankfully, they were gone for 1/3 of the show or sat down. (I'm 5'1", so I was grateful they weren't super into the show, LOL).

I thought the band was playing great both nights, but I think they were better at US Bank Arena simply because the acoustics were so much better.
(Same goes for Joe Walsh. He was a lot better in Cincy mostly because of acoustics/sound system).

One surprising thing I liked was just how many people loved when they played "I Should've Known It."
I realize this song is about seven years old now, but it never gets played on the radio and the crowd loved it both times.
It's such a badass song and works out so well in a live performance. Same with "It's Good To Be King," for an album track, the crowd went crazy for it.
IMO, the setlist for the TPHB40 tour, stage design, etc has been the best I've seen (I've been to four shows: 2010/2013/2017/2017).

I LOVED when they played "Walls"... Tom said, "This is a request. I requested it. That still counts, right?" or something along those lines. It was funny and heartfelt.
My only disappointment is that "Walls," during this tour, is played as such an upbeat song. My favorite recording of any TPHB song is the Fillmore acoustic version of "Walls." It's stunning.

I think the combination of the stage setup (with the extra screens in the back, floating balls, etc) and the combination of album songs and radio hits made these shows stand out to me compared to the first two times I saw them. Obviously, I will never forget the first time I saw them in 2010 (from first row, no less)... but the performance at US Bank Arena in Cincy is probably my favorite.

I hope HCC members will get some HQ live tracks recorded from this tour like usual to remember it by.

 

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6 hours ago, Liberty said:

One surprising thing I liked was just how many people loved when they played "I Should've Known It."
I realize this song is about seven years old now, but it never gets played on the radio and the crowd loved it both times.

 That is a heavy riff. Thanks for the review!

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Yeah, cool, thanks for the heads up.

Although, as for the "record needle" and the damage done (to quote a phrase), that gives 12 songs from the FMF-ITGWO-WF era. (In math terms that is some 2/3rds of the show devoted to 14% of the career. If 14 important % at that. Still.) 

Imo, it's a great song to add though, and one that certainly deserves to be played a handful of times on a tour like this. Now let's hear it for The Waiting, Breakdown, Saving Grace and Even The Losers. (Or, like I use to think about these things, just about anything.) Even the slightest rotation is well spent energy, not to say boosting energy. Great move!!

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Seeing them next week in London, Gutted Walls has been dropped for ITGWO ,  might have been a concession to the Lumineers

Agree with the above,  Breakdown and something from the 2000's in for IGTBK and Yer so bad, and it makes a more rounded show. I'd take one of the 2 yous from Wildflowers and replace with a track from YGGT.

My bugbear is I wont back down and Free Fallin played back to back.  Why play maybe your 2 best known songs back to back??

I wont back down at 3. Move YDKHIF to the long jam spot, Free Fallin to start the encore and 1 or 2 of  Swingin/Here comes my girl/Don't do me like that (which being their first top 10 single should be played) in their place

 

 

 

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Coming back to the setlist quandary for a moment. I know the horse has been beaten to death a million times by now, Here's my (newest) solution. I just don't think it's reasonable for TP to switch up a bulk of the show night to night — there's a consistent performance element and structure on a stadium greatest hits tour that is fine to keep in tact night to night. And if he's going to cap the sow at 19 songs, so be it. To me, all that is needed is three slots of rotation:

1. The new song
2. The deeper cut
3. An acoustic song

That's it. Don't mess with the hits, or the openers, or the closers, which changes the show too much and clearly makes TP uncomfortable. If you turn those three slots into wide-ranging rotations night to night, you are doing more than enough to inject variety into the static shows for both the band's benefit and the fans', you're not jeopardizing the heart of the show or the flow, and you're not giving TP anxiety.

Here's my suggestion. Static songs in regular font; rotation slots in bold:

1. Rockin' Around With You
2. Mary Jane's Last Dance
3. You Don't Know How It Feels
4. New song rotation: Forgotten Man/Red River/All You Can Carry/Fault Lines/U Get Me High/American Dream Plan B
5. You Got Lucky
6. I Won't Back Down
7. Free Fallin
8. Walls
9 Don't Come Around Here No More
10. It's Good to Be King
11. Deeper cut rotation: Crawling Back to You/You're Gonna Get It/Something Big/Have Love Will Travel/Swingin/Good Enough
12. Wildflowers
13. Learning To Fly
14. Acoustic song rotation: No Second Thoughts/Time to Move On/Square One/Two Gunslingers/Dogs on the Run/Rebels
15. I Should Have Known It
16. Refugee
17. Runnin Down A Dream

18. You Wreck Me
19. American Girl 


That allows the tour to maintain its greatest hit flavor without simply going through the motions. My biggest qualms with the current setlist is the laziness of "Forgotten Man" and "Yer So Bad." Really Tom, you can't bother to rehearse any other songs from Hypnotic Eye? It is a tragedy that so much good stuff goes completely unplayed from that album. And "Yer So Bad" just feels too easy. There is so much more the band could explore acoustically. Those are the easiest areas to explore variety in the concert.

Rotating out "Crawling Back to You" for a non-Wildflowers cut is a nice change also. I'm not talking about busting out super obscure stuff like "Sweet William" or "Restless" or "Ain't Love Strange" or anything — save that for smaller venues and residencies. I think second tier songs that we know they've already rehearsed would do fine there.

Anyway, that's my .02 for the day! :D

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^ How eloquently put! As so often been my point: very little rotation can go a long way! Not sure why that is so hard to see. Certainly, this is the case when the formula, as here, is not only post mortem stiff since the tour started, but rather since the bulk of a decade or two. If I had a say, you'd too be hired as TP adviser in these issues. It's simple and it's genius. Basic level genius, mind you  - don't let it go to your head! - but still genius enough to prove my age old point: that within limits something like your suggestion would make for a much better approach and a much more alive felt situation, big impact with small measures. (Now if you could find a solution for the canned remarks and pleasantries too, Id make you senior top chief of miracles.)

 

4 hours ago, High Grass Dog said:

Really Tom, you can't bother to rehearse any other songs from Hypnotic Eye?

Yeah, really?

4 hours ago, High Grass Dog said:

Don't mess with the hits, or the openers, or the closers, which changes the show too much and clearly makes TP uncomfortable.

Well, messing with any detail, any step or wording even, in the carefully staged show is clearly making him "uncomfortable". Not exactly too rock'n'roll, by any definition I know. Rather it's all too stiff n stale.

That said - age and health has got nothing to do with this. It's not a valid argument. Growing old and changing in various ways is perfectly normal. But doing so with dignity, does not entail doing things you really don't want to do, or to play by rules you don't believe in. So, it's anyone's personal decision what is what with all of that in the case of TP.

Either way it's a matter of approach. As the example above shows, a little goes a long way. It doesn't have to be rocket science. It doesn't even have to be real rock'n'roll (that's too much to ask from most s.c. rock stars anyway, even if TP used to be one of the prime exceptions from that rule). It can be very simple, really. Just killing the auto pilot at times is a good start. Then rotate two or three slots from night to night, and even more importantly: change more than two or three songs from tour to tour (!!) and your show will soon seem quite exciting, no matter how automated it is and how tired you are. Again, it's very simple. Thanks for pointing that out!

4 hours ago, High Grass Dog said:

 It is a tragedy that so much good stuff goes completely unplayed from that album. 

Hm. Indeed. Or from any album. A tragedy. Obviously, with a band like this, all of the above is really minimum requirement. When they really play stuff is when it gets really excited! But, as so often been noted, this (as opposed to other tours looking just like it) is supposed to be a greatest hits exposé and therefor we shall not go over board with the expectations. But a little sign of life? Please? If you can't do it the way you enjoy it and been talking about, then don't do it. Simple.

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I was at BST Hyde Park in London last Sunday - it was a fabulous show, the venue was breathtaking and the crowd was really cool, no pushing or shoving.
The boys rocked the place! Yes, the set list is repetitive, but it works just so well on stage. No wonder Tom decides on playing these songs.
65,000 tickets were sold that night, 65,000 smiles all the way. The Shelters, The Lumineers, Stevie Nicks with Waddy Wachtel in her band, and our boys - the were all top of the notch.

I've uploaded some pictures in the gallery:

 

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Checking back in here with some thoughts....:)

It has been interesting following the updates on various social media of how this band and this music is bringing a lot of people together, putting smiles on faces, family 'bonding time' at a concert, Tom and the band meeting a lady who had been a musician who is dealing with terminal cancer, people getting to see the band for the first time, and generally enjoying themselves. In the world as it is, there is a lot to be said for being able to switch off for a couple of hours and enjoy a concert of great songs delivered by great musicians. I have always believed that there is a great power in the music of TPATHB.

Yes, most definitely the big shed arena static set lists leave those of us who want to hear more variety disappointed. I have shared my thoughts on that on various threads. It is what it is though. On this particular tour I would be more inclined to give Tom a bit of a free pass on the set list issue than on previous tours as I think that he is having to carefully manage his vocals now particularly post 2014 (i've gone into detail on this earlier in the thread)....apart from Refugee and to a certain extent American Girl the rest of the songs on the set list are less taxing on his voice and present vocal capabilities. The vocal chorus on Free Fallin' is boosted from the soundboard mixing desk, I am led to believe...it was also interesting to see the early video logs of the sound engineer when he talked about how they have a ''pitch changing'' rather than a pitch correction console for the vocals. He was keen to emphasise it was pitch changing rather than pitch correction. I think that could be a big reason for the static set list this tour specifically. They are the songs that Tom is most comfortable singing and he obviously wants to sound as best as he can ....there are of course other songs that could be played in a similar vocal register, but Tom has chosen not to do so.

It will be interesting to see what dynamic emerges when this tour ends, I would not be at all surprised if Tom decides to concentrate on his radio show and release a select number of songs that he works on in the studio via Tom Petty radio from here on out. I would also have a hunch that the small venue Wildflowers album tour may be more unlikely than likely to take place now, based on the fact that this tour has a mini wildflowers set.....it could be a mini dry run of testing some of those songs acoustically or it could be a 'compromise' of getting those Wildflowers songs in now on this tour rather than a strand alone Wildflowers tour after. I could be wrong, I could be right...it will be interesting to see.  

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On 7/12/2017 at 5:58 AM, NightDriver said:

I was at BST Hyde Park in London last Sunday - it was a fabulous show, the venue was breathtaking and the crowd was really cool, no pushing or shoving.
The boys rocked the place! Yes, the set list is repetitive, but it works just so well on stage. No wonder Tom decides on playing these songs.
65,000 tickets were sold that night, 65,000 smiles all the way. The Shelters, The Lumineers, Stevie Nicks with Waddy Wachtel in her band, and our boys - the were all top of the notch.

I've uploaded some pictures in the gallery:

 

Thank you for the review and pictures!  It sounds like a great show and I'm happy you had a good time!  It looked like you met a lot of nice people too!  

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18 hours ago, Marion said:

Thank you for the review and pictures!  It sounds like a great show and I'm happy you had a good time!  It looked like you met a lot of nice people too!  

Absolutely, had a brilliant time and met some very nice Pettyheads from the US, England, Scotland, Sweden, the Netherlands, Russia and Singapore!
It was truly an international get-together!

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On 12/07/2017 at 5:10 AM, Shelter said:

^ How eloquently put! As so often been my point: very little rotation can go a long way! Not sure why that is so hard to see. Certainly, this is the case when the formula, as here, is not only post mortem stiff since the tour started, but rather since the bulk of a decade or two. If I had a say, you'd too be hired as TP adviser in these issues. It's simple and it's genius. Basic level genius, mind you  - don't let it go to your head! - but still genius enough to prove my age old point: that within limits something like your suggestion would make for a much better approach and a much more alive felt situation, big impact with small measures. (Now if you could find a solution for the canned remarks and pleasantries too, Id make you senior top chief of miracles.)

 

Yeah, really?

Well, messing with any detail, any step or wording even, in the carefully staged show is clearly making him "uncomfortable". Not exactly too rock'n'roll, by any definition I know. Rather it's all too stiff n stale.

That said - age and health has got nothing to do with this. It's not a valid argument. Growing old and changing in various ways is perfectly normal. But doing so with dignity, does not entail doing things you really don't want to do, or to play by rules you don't believe in. So, it's anyone's personal decision what is what with all of that in the case of TP.

Either way it's a matter of approach. As the example above shows, a little goes a long way. It doesn't have to be rocket science. It doesn't even have to be real rock'n'roll (that's too much to ask from most s.c. rock stars anyway, even if TP used to be one of the prime exceptions from that rule). It can be very simple, really. Just killing the auto pilot at times is a good start. Then rotate two or three slots from night to night, and even more importantly: change more than two or three songs from tour to tour (!!) and your show will soon seem quite exciting, no matter how automated it is and how tired you are. Again, it's very simple. Thanks for pointing that out!

Hm. Indeed. Or from any album. A tragedy. Obviously, with a band like this, all of the above is really minimum requirement. When they really play stuff is when it gets really excited! But, as so often been noted, this (as opposed to other tours looking just like it) is supposed to be a greatest hits exposé and therefor we shall not go over board with the expectations. But a little sign of life? Please? If you can't do it the way you enjoy it and been talking about, then don't do it. Simple.

I realise they had nowhere near as many hits as Petty, but Midnight Oil have played 90+ different songs thus far on their reunion tour! That's after a 15 year hiatus and both bands have probably played a comparable amount of gigs thus far this year.

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^ Yes, to compare TPATH with MO might be a stretch. But still.. not really, you're right! Cause, the thing is - obviously (and like I've been heard saying more times than most logic would deem necessary, sorry) - that none of this is really rocket science or down to natural law, like some might have you believe.

Fact: So many bands and acts, on all levels of success, do that. By certain definitions, that is even the "real" way of doing it, of being a musician, playing music, as opposed to being a salesman, selling just any trademarked and specifically designed product. If anything I'd say that it's a band with just a handful of hits that would be most easily convinced that they would need to stick to those exact songs, so kudos to MO, in that respect then. In fact there are several acts with a lot more "hits" than TP (in the public eye) that has a more sound approach to the setlist (during tours and certainly between tours!) And there are bands both with few and tons of hits that are working their set like mad, too. I'm not a fan of the latter (it can be nice, but it's not necessary and like most agree, one or two "anchor moments" are nice for audiences of most walks), but I am cecrtainly not a fan making music a frozen meal either, ready to be defrosted and heated to exact form and taste night after night, if you catch my drift.

Further, as for hits, if you have just one or no hits, you are, by any definition, free to do what you like (not even the beer drinking, music killing crowd that some acts have made top managers of their set lists, would have anything to say, cause they don't know any of the songs anyway). And if you have a looong list of classic hits, you are in the best of positions, cause you don't have to venture too far or deep, you don't have to work too hard as is where, since you can rotate most spots on your setlist twice or three times over and still have 90% or more of your set widely recognized, loved and shared. All that as far as listening to the big part of the crowd that puts diamonds in your ears, but don't really care for your MUSIC that much. The fair weather friends, as it were - those are nice to have to make your first few milions and a name to do what you want. After that, they are mostly a necessary pest, so to speak. Stinking up the experience (although it is nice to have them sing along to Free Fallin' every now and then, most real rock moments are lost on most of them, which is too bad for the band and the real fans.) 

Again.. if you have no hits or if you have tons, that shallow-but-big segment of the crowd are the easiest pleased. Question is why you even take those so much in consideration once you made it big enough not to depend on them. And even if you feel obliged to do so (for whatever reasons you may think you have to keep being a salesman - or worse - becoming more and more of a salesman the older you get - hey, "thinking about the family" comes in many variations, some are spelled with a number of zeroes) if you want to do it, there are still many decent or halfdecent ways to aim your act towards the masses. Like MO shows in your example - or like Bob, Eddie, Neil, Bruce and so many others over the years that are not so much smaller deals or brands than TPATH............. it's not a matter of what you must do - it's a matter of what you want to do and what you think fun and fair. In short: there's plenty proof in world history that this is all about approach. Personally I'd just wish - no matter what your preferences are in terms of the action - that all the whitewash extravaganza and explanations would end. Sure, like it the way it is, but don't try to dress it up or explain it away as something it is not. Any kind of approach to a live show approach is possible for a real artist. For a product, perhaps not so much.  

 

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