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MaryJanes2ndLastDance

Some Thoughts on Into The Great Wide Open

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I recently listened to Into the Great Wide Open and it’s definitely a mix of highs and lows.

 

     Learning to Fly—sometimes it seems a little cheesy but it’s just a fun, sweet pop song. I like it.

 

    Kings Highway—I never understood the appeal; seems like whenever they pull it out live people like it but it just feels bland; a bland riff, not enough propulsive energy. As if that weren’t enough, I’ll add this to my grievances, I think the title is lame. He already has a song called Kings Road. Now Kings Highway. Maybe he’ll make it a trilogy and give us Kings Cul-de-sac. Kings Puddle. All right, enough, I know this is a pretty popular song on here but it’s just kinda dull.

 

 However! The acoustic, stripped down version, well…that’s something else. I like that version of the song. With drums and everyone going at it, it just falls flat but the mellow version transforms the song, it becomes plaintive and sweet.

 

But the album stinks.

 

Into the Great Wide Open—I like it musically but dislike it lyrically. Usually the former is enough for me to like a song but in this case, the sad story of Eddie Rebel is a bit too morose for me. If it’s somewhat tongue in cheek, well…that would be even worse, who wants a professional musician singing about a failed musician if it’s not meant to be taken seriously. But some of Tom’s delivery feels like tongue in cheek, that we should observe Eddie with a sense of distance, which I find off-putting. It’s less than four minutes long but it seems longer; it drags. Nice playing by the band though.

 

 

 

Two Gunslingers—this is the opposite of the title track of me, I really like these lyrics and wish the music had more bite, the bit towards the end that Benmont's playing sounds really good. The sentiment of the song is enough to lift this tune for me; I like it. Not great, but good.

 

 

The Dark of The Sun—it feels like another stab at Kings Highway, sitting here, I can recall the line about Orion’s belt or something that I liked but melodically, it’s…well…just okay, it doesn’t work for me that much but I can see why others might like it, there’s a certain playfulness to the song, a light touch with wistful lyrics, which usually makes a song. Perhaps it’s a victim of Lynne’s production; maybe what it needed was more energy. It just feels too middle of the road.

 

All Or Nothin’—what a riff. Definitely one of their heaviest. And with such a great groove. Oh yes, this is a really good song. 

 

All the Wrong Reasons—I read the interview where someone said Benmont called this song Refallin’. That really says it all. A true low point. You gave us Free Fallin’. No one asked for its clone. The worst song on the album.

 

 

Too Good To Be True—I like it. A nice groove, interesting things going on musically, the lyrics are sad but there’s no ironic distance this time, just noting how the song’s title can happen in life and how easily some dreams are dashed. 

 

Out in the Cold——my opinion of this has changed over the years, for a long time I really liked it, then for a while I thought it was mediocre. I really enjoyed it again this time; too bad Lynne muted Stan’s drums, I like the fills/rolls he does throughout the song but this one really needed to be unhinged.

 

 

You and I will Meet Again—one of his best compositions ever. There’s so much to this wonderful song in less than four minutes! That outdo, wow! It’s reminiscent of the ending to A Day In the Life, except where that seems a bit downbeat in its intensity, almost like the end of a breakdown, this one feels jubilant, as if the hope contained in the song is about to be realized and we keep building towards it…we don’t reach it but we will. We don’t have to hear the realization, after all, that’s not what this song is about, it’s about hope. And there’s a lot going on in that outro, from the guitars coming in and out, to Benmont’s playing, a cohesive blend of instruments all building, all rising to something amazing.

 

From the first notes, one wouldn’t instantly think the song is going to go in that direction, it starts somewhat gently, Tom’s lyrics painting an evocative picture building towards one of his best lines “A black winged hawk is circling…”

 

And the outro. This is an EPIC song contained within less than four minutes, a mix of wistfulness, hope and rising bombast at the end. One of his best songs.

 

 

Makin’ Some Noise——just like Out in the Cold, it needed more grit, the guitars needed to scream, the rhythm section explode. Some really nice lyrics, especially the line about guitar playing with the other person. It’s evocative and playful!

 

Built To Last——a nice end to the album, reminds me of a 50s song, maybe that was the intent, good booming drums and just a simple lyric, kind of a more elaborate and muscular version of Alright for Now. It goes down easy and if one is so inclined, the chiming into to Learning To Fly is a good way to start the record over again.

 

 

I really like the album cover and the constellation artwork, the red and black work great together.

 

In some spots I’m fine with Lynne’s production but feel it really muted Shan’s playing and sound of his drums and had an negative effect on the more rocking songs. They’re still enjoyable but could’ve been more driving and intense.

 

Eight out of Twelve songs, not bad. Seems kinda above average for most TPATH albums, that are usually filled with highs and too much filler. The lows on this range from the bland to the awful All The Wrong Reasons but the highs are great and overall leave me with a good impression of the album. Whenever I return to it, I’ve forgotten about the weaker songs and find myself skipping them to get to the good stuff…

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An interesting review but how many times have you listened to the album

without skippng tracks?

 

Would like to see your reviews of albums that precede this album as

after this album is the point where I gradually lost interest in the band with each album getting worse.

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King's Turnpike, no? Let's go back and have a look, shall we..

Interesting to have you expand on this. Although I don't agree much. Apart from what I already said about the pro's and con's of the ITGWO production in the "MVP" thread and the "Stan's Last Stand" thread (that I find ITGWO to be Jeff's perhaps finest moment and one of few fairly clean victories for his methods, despite the certain problems it never the less carries) and all that - some of which we do seem to agree about - I must say that I find the actual songwriting on ITGWO - the material itself - to be very strong and timeless. I don't seem to hear much of what you hear. This to me is not a skip'n'listen album. It's an album-album.

That said, that you find two/thirds good material (8/12) to be "above average" for a TP album sounds a bit surprising, no? If anything, I'd say that a TP album with such quota is unusually weak. To me there is Let Me Up, Last DJ and on a bad day maybe some of the others that can even touch such a "bad" grading.) There are not many TP albums that carries more than two or three weak moments, as I see it. But I suppose it's a question of what is to be considered filler - maybe another discussion. As for ITGWO, I think I can hear filler vibes on perhaps three songs: All The Wrong Reasons, Making Some Noise and Built to Last. Still they, at least the first one - despite it being an obvious return to Free Fallin in terms of musical structure - I think works perfectly and more or less define the good aspects of a filler's very purpose in that it really strengthens the feel of the total album in much the same way as say the sleeve artwork does. And the same thing can be said for the title track - not only do I find it to be great in itself, both lyrics (I just hear a story, really, much like any other) and music (save for some minor production issues perhaps) - but in the context of the album theme and the ground breaking video (a short film no less, that was an important and integral part of the album and of the era in general) I think it sits perfectly and underscores the whole Great Wide Open concept.

For me, Built To Last is the one song of the album that don't quite holds up in terms of neither production nor song quality - it's so much filler it's grinds my ears a bit - the rest is great songwriting, sometimes recorded or produced in a less than great manner, but all in all this put ITGWO just behind my top five TP albums. And on a good day it makes that list.

And - two things that I do very much agree on is that All or Nothing and You And I Will Meet Again are fantastic songs! Among his best and most underrated ever. And hence sorely missing - like so many other of his finest songs - from occasionally showing at their live sets. They - as we know does for example Too Good To Be True - would make for absolutely great live renditions, I'm sure. If anything, All of Nothing would make for a perfect Mojo or Hypnotic Eye era song. So, TP.. just do it!

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Kings Highway has a permanent spot in my top 5 TPATH songs ever. I just think the melody is beautiful and I love the lyrics. That song helped me through a very rough patch in my life, so I'm sure that has something to do with why I love it so much.

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An interesting review but how many times have you listened to the album

without skippng tracks?

 

 

I've listened to it quite a bit years ago. Now I just skip along the songs I like. Just yesterday I tried giving Dark of the Sun another chance but found myself losing interest fairly quickly.

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That said, that you find two/thirds good material (8/12) to be "above average" for a TP album sounds a bit surprising, no? If anything, I'd say that a TP album with such quota is unusually weak. To me there is Let Me Up, Last DJ and on a bad day maybe some of the others that can even touch such a "bad" grading.) There are not many TP albums that carries more than two or three weak moments, as I see it. But I suppose it's a question of what is to be considered filler - maybe another discussion. 

 

Sure. I guess it really just comes down to individual taste; while one can elaborate, in the end, you enjoy a song or you don't. The music connects or it doesn't, sometimes instantaneously, sometimes after years. I enjoy the conversations though.

 

I think my taste is somewhere between the casual, Greatest Hits fan and people who post here (or on the official board). There are a number of great songs that have become deep cuts, unheard by the casual fan and played infrequently or not all by the band but there's also quite a lot of filler on his albums. Eight out of twelve is pretty good in comparison to some of his other albums. Unlike others, I think of TPATH as more than just a singles band but with some exception, not as a full album band either. Each album has maybe an e.p.'s worth of really good songs for me.

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Kings Highway has a permanent spot in my top 5 TPATH songs ever. I just think the melody is beautiful and I love the lyrics. That song helped me through a very rough patch in my life, so I'm sure that has something to do with why I love it so much.

 

Thanks for sharing this, I'm glad the song means so much to you and was able to help you in life; I'm sure that's the highest compliment one could pay Tom and the band. 

 

cheers

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I think of TPATH as more than just a singles band but with some exception, not as a full album band either. Each album has maybe an e.p.'s worth of really good songs for me.

Hm. Ok, that explains it, then. I think I'm the other way around for the most parts; to me most of his albums holds up as albums. (It's ironic though, that the album that was perhaps meant to be the most ambitious in terms of theme, styles and content, ended up being one of the least album-albums of their career, replete with filler that don't walk in line. Guess which one. Ha!)

See, to me there's a distinct difference between good filler and bad filler in this respect, non platinium tracks working FOR or AGAINST the album as a whole. And the latter kind - the ones that would have the catalogue being about the singles, or some odd exceptional tracks - is really a minority as I see it. Making a good album is not about stuffing it with singles, but allowing the singles to be both singles and at the same time integral parts of a whole. I think TP does this very well for most of the time. It's a very different thing to hear a song on the Greatest Hits album and to hear it in it's original context. And that works both ways. One example is Don't Come Around Here No More, that I think really is a fun single and that shows up naturally in the mixed context of the hits album, but doesn't do anything for the album feel of Southern Accents. On the other hand, Even The Losers feels very important in it's album context but really takes the space from better selections of one-off type or hits for the Greatest Hits album.

Ok, enough of that. I see your point. Just wanted to specify how I don't share it. :) Like you say - it's enjoyable.

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See, to me there's a distinct difference between good filler and bad filler in this respect, non platinium tracks working FOR or AGAINST the album as a whole. And the latter kind - the ones that would have the catalogue being about the singles, or some odd exceptional tracks - is really a minority as I see it. Making a good album is not about stuffing it with singles, but allowing the singles to be both singles and at the same time integral parts of a whole. I think TP does this very well for most of the time.

 

 

 Oh, I agree, I wouldn't even call something good filler, that is, if I like it, I don't think of it as filler; case in point Burnt Out Town. Not one of my favorites on the album, didn't even care for it for a while but it grew on me and fits nicely, as kind of a change of pace, a brief digression before Shadow People.

 

The only difference is just personal taste, I think Tom has some clunkers or fillers on his albums but most albums have a good e.p. as I said before, while others work in totality. Even when I may not like where an artist has gone creatively, I usually respect the effort when they try something new. Mojo, blues or "blues" album, while I'm sure as a genre is something they were quite versed in playing, at soundchecks and residencies, was a different step for them as an actual album of originals that fall within that template. 

 

Hypnotic Eye is just such an amazing run of songs, with such a good flow, I can listen to it from start to finish and back again. 

 

Back to the topic proper, the songs I like and dislike on this record have pretty much stayed the same. Some songs grow on me or I grow a bit tired of them over the years, but this grouping has stayed consistent.

 

cheers

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Thanks for bringing this one up, MJ2ndLD!

However, I do not share your partly negative view of the album (eight out of twelve still is good, compared to many other non-Petty albums) and want to share some thoughts here.

 

To get a single take on this album from me is an almost impossible task... but I'll try anyway.

First of all, I'm really biased. It's the album I not only fell in love for the first time with Tom's music but also with acoustic guitars. It eventually made me want to go out and buy one, which was not THAT easy for me back then (I was only 13), but a few years later I finally did it and haven't stopped playing, singing and writing songs ever since. Like probably many people my age I first discovered Petty's music through the video to the title track. I didn't see it as sarcastic, which it probably is, but as a sad and funny story. And somehow the overall sound and feeling of the song to me seemed like magic, like a place I wanted to explore more. Which I did!

So fast forward a little bit to my personal track-to-track-notes.

 

Learning to Fly - Great opener that perfectly captures the feeling and themes of the album to come. I'm still amazed at how they could produce such a dense sound that's very airy at the same time. And I admire the art of constructing a whole song around one single chord pattern that does not change and does not get boring. The way the melody changes, you don't really notice it's always the same chords in the same order. The simple wisdom of the lyric becomes obvious only in the acoustic arrangement they do live; the band arrangement with its smooth groove gives you the impression of a pop song first. Which deepens over time and with every time you hear it. Note the champagne bucket!

 

King's Highway - To me, there's absolutely nothing wrong repeating song titles or words in song titles. Kings Road? No problem! Did you count the songs Bruce Springsteen has written with the word night in the title? Or how many Jeff Lynne wrote with the word blue in the title? A nice little optimistic song, very upbeat and full of hope. Faorite line: I don't wanne wake up / In a room alone /Don't wanna end up someone / That I don't even know.

 

Into The Great Wide Open - I said it all above.

 

Two Gunslingers - A good anti-war song, as Petty himself once put it. I find the Western imagery pretty clever. Plus the chorus adds one dimension to the message, not just repeating what the verses say: I'm taking control of my life. I won't let anybody tell me to put up a gun and kill somebody, I will not blindly follow leaders. Nice tune, too.

 

The Dark of The Sun  - I didn't really like this one at first. But the melody would not go away. The powerful bridge and chorus are really going to interesting places. And it's a beautiful love song, isn't it?

 

All or Nothin' - A really mean, groovy song with a hard rocking beat, a great vocal performance by Tom, a sinister lyric AND a magnificent solo from Campbell... what's not to like? In general, Campbell is some kind of an unsung hero on this record (like on Highway Companion). His slide guitar really sings.

 

All The Wrong Reasons - Ben's always quoted here calling it "Refallin'" (good one!), but he's also the one who's been begging Tom to play All The Wrong Reasons live. It's a very bold move to release a song like this on the follow-up album to Full Moon Fever. But you can also look at it the other way: The lyrics don't have anything to do with Free Fallin' and also the melody is different to a degree that makes you wonder how he did it: Come up with a song in the same key and almost the same chord structure that still sounds that much different. Like a songwriting exercise ("O.K., now that you wrote Free Fallin', take the chords and write another one!"). Plus for me the feeling is totally different from Free Fallin's, strangely enough.

 

Too Good to be True - Quite interesting stuff musically, good beat, good lyric... and one more different shading of the album's overall theme.

 

Out in The Cold - That one to me sounds most like a filler. Probably the only one. But I still like it better than other rocking filler material (A Thing About You, Kings Road, Finding Out, Century City).

 

You And I Will Meet Again - A little masterpiece. To show what a songwriting genius he is, Petty put that nice little turnaround in the last chorus. In the outro, you can hear a multi-tracked Tom singing an almost hidden harmony part. I love the lines "I heard you singing to no one / I saw you dancing all alone" and "A red-winged hawk is circling / The blacktop stretches out for days". So much meaning and so many wonderful images in just a few words. He draws maps in your memory with these words and the way he sings them.

 

Makin' Some Noise - Also a great rocker that I still like a lot. It has a great riff that in my opinion lifts it a good deal above filler status. Nothing brilliant lyrically, but what the heck - ever read the lyrics to School Days?

 

Built to Last - I can't see why this should be considered a filler. Even Tom doesn't like it that much. I think it's one of his most beautiful songs, soundwise and else. It has one of Petty's best opening lines. Or verses. Plus some other great lines full of meaning and emotion, but almost no words: "She has followed me down / Along some empty streets / She has followed me where / The rain would fall in sheets / And I know I've been changing / Changing like the wind". What's also brilliant is the wordless bridge! And Campbell's solo, the sound of the guitar! Plus, I don't understand the comparisons to fifties-r'n'b-ballads... it might have a chord structure reminiscent of that era, that's true, but the sound of the whole thing is just like nothing else. Otherworldly.

 

So, that's my views in a nutshell.

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You And I Will Meet Again - A little masterpiece. To show what a songwriting genius he is, Petty put that nice little turnaround in the last chorus. In the outro, you can hear a multi-tracked Tom singing an almost hidden harmony part. I love the lines "I heard you singing to no one / I saw you dancing all alone" and "A red-winged hawk is circling / The blacktop stretches out for days". So much meaning and so many wonderful images in just a few words. He draws maps in your memory with these words and the way he sings them.

 

Anyone else think this would be a killer live song? I actually think, with that swirling, jangling opening hook, this would be a great song for TPATH to open a show with.

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Anyone else think this would be a killer live song? I actually think, with that swirling, jangling opening hook, this would be a great song for TPATH to open a show with.

 

 

I could see The Waiting opening a show, have Tom up there by himself, slowly bring the band in and off they go and I could see You and I will Meet Again as the second to last song, jamming on the outro before going into American Girl. Who knows, maybe they'll pull it out at a residency, they did briefly bring back When The Time Comes!

 

cheers

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King's Highway - To me, there's absolutely nothing wrong repeating song titles or words in song titles. Kings Road? No problem! Did you count the songs Bruce Springsteen has written with the word night in the title? Or how many Jeff Lynne wrote with the word blue in the title? A nice little optimistic song, very upbeat and full of hope. Faorite line: I don't wanne wake up / In a room alone /Don't wanna end up someone / That I don't even know.

 

Ahh, I don't like Bruce Springsteen, so I couldn't say.

 

Of course, I understand this is pure SPECULATION on my part but it struck me as lazy.

 

It's not like there's some connection between the songs, if Highwya reflected back on Road in some way, I could understand the similar sounding titles. But they seem like two unrelated songs.

 

The simplest answer is probably the most logical.

 

Maybe Tom just liked how it sounded, maybe he forgot he had a song called Kings Road, maybe someone pointed it out and he didn't care, so what, isn't he allowed to use Kings in two separate songs? 

 

I don't know. I just don't like it.

 

I did like reading your opinion, not just of this song but the album too.

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Maybe Tom just liked how it sounded, maybe he forgot he had a song called Kings Road, maybe someone pointed it out and he didn't care, so what, isn't he allowed to use Kings in two separate songs? 

I think that's exactly it. He just liked it. And of course you're allowed to use one and the same word in different songs as often as you like. The Avett Brothers made some kind of a game out of this, having a song called "Pretty Girl From BLANK" on many of their albums (Pretty Girl From Michigan, Pretty Girl From Chile, Pretty Girl At The Airport...).

 

Sometimes, like with Springsteen, when songwriters use the same word in different titles a lot it's some kind of a theme for them, a subject they revisit every now and then (or even on a regular basis). That's not laziness I'd say but a way to work artistically, to tackle your subject from different angles, to explore the subject in a deeper way or whatever.

I don't think that's the case with Kings Road and King's Highway, though.

 

I did like reading your opinion, not just of this song but the album too.

 Thank you! :)

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Sometimes, like with Springsteen, when songwriters use the same word in different titles a lot it's some kind of a theme for them, a subject they revisit every now and then (or even on a regular basis). That's not laziness I'd say but a way to work artistically, to tackle your subject from different angles, to explore the subject in a deeper way or whatever.

I don't think that's the case with Kings Road and King's Highway, though.

 

   Yes, that was my point. It can be interesting when an artist revisits a theme, I don't think that's laziness at all but calling a song Kings Highway after already having one called Kings Road seems that way to me. 

 

cheers

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I don't even understand how it'd be anything wrong, disturbing or even strange with coincidental overlapping title words of roads and highways, kings and queen and all that too (and what about "Time" ?? didn't TP use a lot of "Time" in his writing??) - as long as it's not the same set of lyrics or the same music, which it is not by a long shot in the case of King's Highway/Road.

Sure, I too find certain song titles over the years less appealing, but the only one that I could raise an issue with in terms of repetition, TP being too hooked not only a word but a whole phrase, absurdly forgetful or - as it's been called - "lazy" (let me just call it.. less stylish), would be You Get Me High vs U Get Me High. That is not beautiful. Good song though. The last one, that is. I'd say it's putting the phrase to better use.

 

Anyone else think this would be a killer live song?

Yes. Like I said, I do think so very much! It's far from the only song missing out there on the road (highway!) but it sure is one of the best songs in the whole catalogue, one of few that would deserve to show up very often, I'm sure, and still it don't get played. Shame.

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I don't even understand how it'd be anything wrong, disturbing or even strange with coincidental overlapping title words of roads and highways, kings and queen and all that too (and what about "Time" ?? didn't TP use a lot of "Time" in his writing??) - as long as it's not the same set of lyrics or the same music, which it is not by a long shot in the case of King's Highway/Road.

 

   

I'll take another stab at regicide.  

 

Of course he can use any words he wants in any way he wants and I don't expect you (or u, Time facetiousness aside) to think I'm saying otherwise.

 

No doubt he's sighing with relief at my permission to title things as he chooses, but it's lazy and uninspired to me, as if he'd titled a new song Learning to Drive. It doesn't help that the song is (pun intended) middle of the road, highway, whatever. 

 

cheers

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Ok then. Got it. To me it's all just words, creating vastly different imagery and meaning from one time to another.

Learning to Drive

Good one! :D Do I sense a potential theme album coming up..? Learning to Swim, Learning to Dance.. the hits of tomorrow..

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Speaking of Learning to Fly; I think they've performed three different versions.

 

1) The regular version; though I don't think it's been performed like this in years. Maybe over a decade.

 

2) The acoustic mellow version, similar to how they've done Kings Highway. I'm pretty sure this version exists out there, I think I've heard it somewhere, maybe the fillmore? Very gentle arrangement.

 

3) The "gospel" version, with crowd participation. I don't know when they began doing this version, but I know they were playing it like this in 06 and it seems like it's how they've done it since.

 

I would enjoy a return to the first version if they stretched out the ending, I think it could be a good song to end the main set with, especially if they really jammed on the ending. It's a very popular single and the band could "take off" with the ending and soar.

 

cheers

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Yes, they did this acoustic mellow version at their last gig with Stan Lynch, so I guess that's the way they played it in the nineties. There's already a thread elsewhere, dealing with Learning to Fly, where I shared my vision of the full band version combined with the gospel version, as you fittingly put it.

 

To me, when a song can be arranged in different ways and all of them work, it's a very strong indicator that it's very good songwriting. Because you can bare the core of the song and put it into different clothes, so to speak. That only works if the core is solid. I'm not sure, but TPHB might have learned that on the Dylan tour in the eighties. So just because the arrangement of Learning to Fly on the album is very accessible, very pop, this does not mean it's a lightweight song. And vice versa: I don't believe every song that comes in a difficult, unusual or heavy-rocking arrangement is of substance. Sometimes some kind of trick is necessary to make a weak song work, e.g. giving it to brilliant musicians who can work out a solid arrangement. But the core stays weak.

 

And Petty's returning to Learning to Fly in its different guises also shows that it really means something to him. If he just wanted to give the audience the greatest hits treatment he would go for the band version and not think about it any further. So I guess he's very well aware that in Learning to Fly, in all its alleged simplicity - regarding lyrics and chord structure - he has found something very special.

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I don't even understand how it'd be anything wrong, disturbing or even strange with coincidental overlapping title words of roads and highways, kings and queen and all that too (and what about "Time" ?? didn't TP use a lot of "Time" in his writing??) - as long as it's not the same set of lyrics or the same music, which it is not by a long shot in the case of King's Highway/Road.

Yes, thank you, very good example! Time! "When The Time Comes", "Wake Up Time", "Time To Move On", "Flirting With Time"!

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^ I had a feeling you'd understand..

--

Also – for additional angle – I often keep in mind what TP himself said somewhere. Something about what generally characterizes a good song is that is is still good when done by one simple guitar and a voice, while sitting in the kitchen (or something to that effect). No layers, no studio magic, no extra toppings. I like to think this is a great rule of thumb, if not fully fool proof.

And the point? While ITGWO indeed is one of TP’s albums that are most packed full of layers, studio magic and extra toppings of various sorts productionwise, to me the songwriting at the core is extremely consistent - throughout it's one of TP’s albums that best lends itself to be basically strummed and sung, from start to finish, in the simplest manner, just like that definition of what's a good song. Sure, it might take some intermediate level chords/progressions at times, but no real fancy riffs, solo work or skilled co-musicians are needed to pull almost all of it off in nice enough renditions. (Which is a good thing for me. Not being overly skilled, but still enjoying playing my guitars at times, the material on this albums is among the stuff I always return to, time and time again.)

Now, speaking of the album as a whole, this quality is more than can be claimed for most rock albums out there. Even most of TP’s own albums usually have a lot of (admittedly great, but more complicated) material that require quite heavy rework for this basic and stripped down approach to be pulled off successfully - what with multilayered song structures and riff-driven songs. (Confession: I can’t just sit down in my kitchen with my 12 string - or any guitar, for that matter - and without a care in the world play straight through the 70’s albums from start to finish.. or not to mention the advance course stuff of Mojo or Hypnotic Eye. Hardly even the full solo albums material, that generally lends itself fairly well to this basic approach though, must say. I can’t even do it with my favorite album Long After Dark - if almost. But with ITGWO it works alright, some would even say it works great.)

So, in line with TP's own remark, and despite everything else that one might find important in an album, I think this aspect says a lot – not only of my lack of guitar playing skills – but of the great and consistent quality of the songs on ITGWO.

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