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Responses To Hypnotic Eye

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Now that most of us have heard the album more than once - how do you like it? Do you have any favorites? Are there tracks you don't really like? What do you think of the sound? The songwriting? Is the comparison with the band's work in the 70s justified? And where would you see Hypnotic Eye in the whole body of work of Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers?

Feel free to speak your mind! :)

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I'm still in the "overwhelmed"-stage.

 

But my first and overall impression is - the album sounds totally organic, very natural and warm, as if the whole band were melded into one single uber-musician.

After listening to Hypnotic Eye, I went for Eric Clapton's JJ Cale tribute album. Certainly a very fine record with many talented instrumentalists, but compared to Eye it sounds totally soul-less, synthetic and sterile (sorry Eric).

 

I love the album and every song on it, one more, one less.

Let me give it a couple more listens before I go into details. :-)

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So far my favorite is All You Can Carry...

 

On Eric's JJ tribute, I like it but on the tracks with Tom I think he's trying too hard to sound like JJ instead of making it his own, either way it is a good album too.

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I like it, their best offering in at least 20 years. So far, my fav is "All You Carry". I don't consider it like their 1st couple LP's, they were more raw energy with a jingle-jangle sound. This is more refined with a bit of distortion (fuzz tone) to pump it up to the next level. After listening a few times, I think there are still too many slow songs on the LP, even though I like them. Billed as a throwback to the old rock n roll days of TPATH, I wish it was all fast RnR songs. As far as this LP being more refined than the early stuff, as I said earlier, Tom said it better than I can, "we're not 20 anymore". With this in mind, a band in their 60's, they are doing a remarkable job and I hope they keep it up til they are at least 100!!!! As a fellow member in the 60 year old club with Tom and the Heartbreakers, I just want to thank them for keeping the music alive. As I've said in the past, Paul McCartney would be #1 on my list to see live, #2 is TPATH. But, when asked who is the best live band in the world today, without a doubt, it's Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers. Well, I think I've rambled on enough, time to listen to The LP again. Enjoy your day!!

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Listening now, haven't heard it all yet. I'm with Benny as far as I wish all the songs were fast rockers. So far my favorites are Fault Lines and American Dream. Not in love with Full Grown Boy as much. I'll send more thoughts when I'm done.

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I totally agree Eye is theire best album in 20 years. In some ways it's the best in 32 years, but I might be deranged in thinking like that.

Favs so far are Fault Lines, All You Can Carry, Shadow People.. but actually, all but two songs qualifies as being among their finest work in 20 years. For now I won't name the two.

Sound is generally impressive - heavy, groovy and fuzzy. I like it a lot! Could be their best sounding album ever. I do ponder if I can seem to tell one or two arrangement/production "flaws" where sections really seem to be stitched together rather than played organically, but that could be just imagination.. In general the production is fantastic and organic, alive. The bass, maybe especially, strikes me as ultra terrific. However, is it really true that all vocals (inc back up) is Tom?? Save for that one credit to Ryan? No Scott or Ben singing at all?? If so... sorry, but for an album with this punch and vibe, that is utter bs. Almost unforgivable.

Songwriting is top notch as well. Really really great! Though there might be echos of Mojo that were allowed to linger a bit long to suit this album.. If the album emerged into something else than those early "Mojo 2.0" sessions, then that type material should've been put to rest for the ultimate effect. And I say this even if I liked Mojo (and even if that also was marketed partly as something it really was not) Although I must say, they at least in part saved these Mojo moments on Eye with production wizzardry. I also agree with above post, that the talk of straight through rock don't hold up at all. A lot of other things are going on for more than half of the running time. That's ok - in fact I love it - but either they lie to sell records or they actually think this is rock'n'roll from start to finish. Either way I think they sell themselves short and I respectfully disagree.

That goes for the 70s comp as well. Cept for a few freak beats and some nasty (in a good way) youthful vocals by TP on the most amazing moments of the album (again, I won't name them here... ) I simply don't hear it. This sounds like right now to me. Plenty musical influences can be heard - even delightful "stealing" - but TPATH 70s is just by accident among them.

Amazing to hear them sound like this at this stage in their career. And to have this type material. When all is said and done, some of their finest single hits moments may lie well behind them, but Eye may prove to be their very finest album ever. Quite remarkable! I love it!

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I like all the songs.  Mellow:  Sins of My Youth & Full Grown Boy & Shadow People & Power Drunk.  Reminiscent of past:  Forgotten Man, Fault Lines, American Dream Plan B. Similar sound:  River River & All You Can Carry.  Favorites:  U Get Me High, Shadow People.  Burt Out Town sounds like MOJO album.

 

Anyone know how to hear mp3 of Playing Dumb ?

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I wrote this *rather long* review for the album:

http://libertyimage.weebly.com/

My favorites so far are Sins Of My Youth and All You Can Carry.
EDIT: I forgot! It's a little vulgar! Sorry! I went in and gave them symbols.

 

Here is the review:

 

If you're searching for inspiration on fighting injustice, turning dreams into truth, and standing up against compromise... Tom Petty is the foremost expert. Petty's honesty and inability to 'back down' makes his music some of the most empowering music to ever reach humanity's ears. There was more than simple teenage rebellion driving him toward his desires. In Tom Petty, there was always the desire to succeed--whatever it took. And that is what it takes. Kim Kardashian can go to H#!!. Real success is in your soul. As Tom would say, “success is doing what you love and paying the rent.” But the success Tom has reached--through good old fashioned hard work--has brought him into legend. There is no end to searching for success. Whenever you reach the money, the fame, the fans, the love, the hate that accompanies Rock Stardom, the search does not go away. When you start where Tom started--rural Florida, poor, with a loving mother who passed away the day after his 30th birthday, and a physically and verbally abusive father--no matter your achievements, you keep working. When you start where he started, you keep fighting for justice and happiness...success.

When Mojo came along in 2010, I had found a Tom Petty who seemed to have evolved into a man who could warp his craftsmanship into any shape he wanted. The music was there, but the anger was gone. The sickness of the music industry's injustices in 2002's The Last DJ seemed to have gone--but to my surprise, Hypnotic Eye is something different. Yes, the craftsmanship is there and better than ever... but so is the anger; so is the honesty. He's releasing his demons and chasing his dreams. Tom Petty is still here to prove his craftsmanship continues to improve and that injustice is still alive. Better get fightin' it. Just another day's hard work.     

 

  1. American Dream Plan B - He's got a dream and he's going to fight until he gets it. Not a new theme for Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, yet here they are with a new distorted rocker. The chorus explodes. There's something to prove here. There's a lighthearted acoustic instrumental, but there's also an angry solo from Mike Campbell. Chasing your dreams is hard work that's never over. It's a bittersweet feeling. Sometimes it seems so easy to give up your dreams and move on... but that's not a compromise we're willing to work with here. The lighthearted guitar reflects the happiness of knowing you're trying to reach your dreams, but the angry guitar reminds me of the fact that dreams are also a burden. Tom snarls, "Well Momma's so sad; Daddy's just mad cause I ain't gon' have the chance he had. My success is anybody's guess, but like a fool I'm betting on happiness."  
     
  2. Fault Lines - We all have them. Fault lines running under our life. Here, Tom shows us again how well he can write a song everyone feels. That's the most difficult thing to achieve in popular music--to write something everyone can relate to. Let's face it, it makes for a good hit. The metaphor is haunting. The secrets sitting in the soul waiting to erupt into a life-changing earthquake. You have to admit, being a SoCal resident for about 40 years will lead almost any poet to this metaphor eventually.  
     
  3. Red River - A great story song akin to the lyrics of "Blue Sunday," "Supernatural Radio," and "Spike." Musically, it reminds me of the '91 album "Into the Great Wide Open." The gypsy references brings "Casa Dega" to mind. It's a soul searching song.  
     
  4. Full Grown Boy - "I like to move on sure and easy / Like a cat creeps through the grass." This is a soft tempo groove. The relaxing sounds reminds me of the sure thoughts of Mojo's "Good Enough" without the power. A sort of "Trip to Pirate's Cove" trance runs through this song like a lazy, sauntering cat.  
     
  5. All You Can Carry - At first listen, this song sounds like a defiant "American Dream Plan B"--something to prove. Somewhere to go--but I don't believe it is. Tom's letting go of his demons. He "saw the flames come across the ridge. Falling ashes in the northern wind." From 1987 until now, Tom hasn't been able to bring himself to write fire metaphors or similes in his music. On his first wife's birthday, flames grew from their back staircase and ravaged his entire home until the only thing that was left were two guitars in the corner of his basement. The fire started early in the morning. His toddler alerted them to the fire. Thankfully, his oldest daughter had stayed at a friend's house for the night. The fire started under her room. The arsonist was never found. Determined, the family decided to rebuild. "Take what you can. All you can carry. Take what you can and leave the past behind. We gotta run."  
     
  6. Power Drunk - "It's the truth within him makes a good man rise / God protect us from the thoughts in some men's minds / God protect us from the pain he leaves behind." Good ole Tom Petty. Pointing his finger at more injustice. If anything can be learned from Tom Petty's lyrics, it's that we should not cower to corruption and allow things to go unnoticed and wrongful acts to go unaccounted for. I sense disgust in Petty's voice. He says that when you sing a song, you have to become that person. You have to believe in what you're singing. "You and I are left in the wind. / In the wake of a rich man's sin." Politician? Probably.
     
  7. Forgotten Man - "Well I feel like a four letter word." Amen son, we've all been there. This is a punchy little rocker reminiscent of "American Girl" and "Mind with a Heart of it's Own." Mike Campbell's guitar pulls the song into the rockstar stratosphere. Don't worry Tom Petty; keep writing rockers like this and we'll never forget you.
     
  8. Sins Of My Youth - Oh, steamy. Psychedelic. Sexy. Dazed. Even... Hypnotic. The melody could hypnotize you into a trance. And as far as I'm concerned, I could listen to this on repeat for hours. It's a daydream and a little snake rattle cuts the song in half just to let you know you're being hypnotized--like a wicked tease. "Let me tell you the truth... I love you more than the sins of my youth." The melody is the spine of the song.    
     
  9. U Get Me High - Whether it's a metaphor or a literal truth, the song is certainly a rocker. As you may have guessed, Tom Petty is a big fan of the legalization of marijuana, and it shows in songs like, "You Don't Know How it Feels," "Don't Pull Me Over," and as some would believe, "Mary Jane's Last Dance."  However, I don't think that's the case here. Making a person "high" by means of love isn't a new concept to music, and Tom Petty rejuvenates it well. "Inspiration at my fingertips. Imagination running wild. You get me high.  You give me something so deep." Tom Petty goes on record for saying he has "never written a song for a girl before." About them? Sure. For one? No. But let me tell you this, if he played this for me, I'd be weak in the knees.   
     
  10. Burnt Out Town - This song shakes up the album. Standing out as a rootsy blues song, it's roots have grown deeper than any blues song on Mojo. Benmont's keys jingle. I'm picturing a man sitting in a bar talkin' about the state of the world. Scott Thurston's harmonica sounds like they called in John Lee Hooker. Originally, my shallow mind believed this song didn't fit--that it should have been on Mojo, but I hadn't looked deep enough. I had a lapse in my faith that Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers choose each song to make a full album (a lost art) where all of the songs give something to each other and continue a unified theme. Here's the anger. Here's the hard working man trying to get by in a dying town. "Yes, here I am, stealing gas with a garden hose. This is a burnt-out town. The city fathers have come to blows. It's out of their realm of reality. The truth's indecent when exposed." Sounds like the guy from "Power Drunk" might just be the mayor.  
     
  11. Shadow People - "What's in their head?" These people are probably the population in "Burnt Out Town." This reflects the notions of the people who are so biased, prejudiced, and have their sheep heads too far up the wolf's a$$ to see what's going on. Yeah, it's pretty dark in there. Lots of shadows. "Cause when he's afraid / He'll destroy anything he don't understand."  And then Tom Petty puts his opinion in, "Well I ain't on the left / And I ain't on the right." The anger is here. The confusion. The injustice. "I ain't even sure I got a dog in this fight." Lastly, he brings the hope back--"Waiting for the sun to be straight overhead / 'Til we ain't got no shadow at all."  
     

This is an album. These songs play off one another and create something whole--something Tom Petty hasn't just realized, but something he's been trying to tell us for at least 40 years. Speak up. Don't cower. Don't hide. If you're a part of something you don't like, quit it. If you see something--say something. If you have a dream, don't let anyone push you over. Walk up to your demons, your bullies, look up into their eyes and tell them, "go f*#% yourself." You might end up falling back, but no one who fights for the dreams and battles injustice ever has an easy ride. Thank you, Tom Petty. Thank you, Heartbreakers.   
*This may be a biased review, as I have never  heard a Tom Petty song I dislike… and I’ve heard them all.

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Great to read your reviews, everyone!  I will put in my two cents after a few more listens.  It is a complicated album.  At first I was loving the music more than the lyrics but since I listened to that Jim Ladd interveiw with Tom and he really shared his thoughts on what the songs mean and how they came about,  I'm looking at them in a different way now.  I like them a lot better.  Right now I think my favorite is Burnt Out Town.  Go figure!

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good album overall; and my favs change every time I hear it; All You Can Carry is my current fav, it combines a great sing-along chorus with awesome Cream-like riffs; can't beat that! I bet they do at least 2 and maybe 3 songs on the new tour

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After giving the album more than a couple of chances, I finally feel I need to confess that

 

SPOILER ALERT

 

I don’t really like the album. As an album. Some songs are really good, but I don’t care too much for most of the rest. But I don’t want to spoil the party for most of you here, so if you’re sensitive about Hypnotic Eye you probably better not read any further.

Like Liberty, I try to give it a track-by-track-review. But please don’t take it too seriously.

 

American Dream Plan B – O.k., this was the first song I heard of Hypnotic Eye, and I still like it. Although I start to kind of miss a certain guitar… what’s it called again? Rickenbacker! That’s it! Where’s the Ric? But, what the heck, it’s a good little (or big) rocker. So let’s see what’s next…

 

Fault Lines – That was, indeed, the second track I knew. It’s a big step forward for Tom and the band, as I see it: A combination of psychotic beat and sugarcane chorus no one has ever tried before. And it has great melodies! So expectations are high for tracks to come…

 

Red River – Hm, the opening break and riff remind me of Mojo (and wasn’t Hypnotic Eye supposed to be a departure from that album’s bluesy approach? I can feel a shadow of a doubt…)… but it’s also a nice mid-tempo-rocker typical of Petty. I like the lyric’s Southern imagery, the witch and all… but something seems to be missing. I don’t know what it is, though.

 

Full Grown Boy – Heartbreakers or no Heartbreakers, I don’t like this kind of jazz. Sorry.

 

All You Can Carry – Yeah, another rocker again! But there’s another Mojo-style bluesy riff… so more of a blues-rock than rock’n’roll… didn’t they say this was supposed to be a rock’n’roll album? Sure, they’re not twenty anymore. But they should know the difference between blues and rock’n’roll. Hell, who knows if not them! If they feel like playing the blues just say so. And don’t promise us an album full of flat-out rockers. Disappointment starts to set in.

 

Power Drunk – The kind of music I don’t like from other people, and I still don’t care for it even if the Heartbreakers play it. Not a song I will come back to often. A melody would have been nice.

 

Forgotten Man – Tom likes his Bo Diddley, but unfortunately he has written his best Diddley-rip-off back in the Seventies with American Girl. He did one more nice version of that approach on She’s The One (Zero From Outer Space). But I guess I will have forgotten Forgotten Man pretty soon. Still not really a melody here.

 

Sins Of My Youth – Well, now that’s a nice one. Interesting chord progression for Petty. Quite unusual. Still, somehow I would have preferred a nice folky ballad. Or at least something as touching as Mojo’s No Reason To Cry. This song here isn’t really touching. In fact, the album develops a strange kind of cold atmosphere. It’s detached somehow… cool, but also cold.

 

U Get Me High – I’m really not one to expect more of the same over and over again from an artist, but didn’t Tom already have a better song of that name (albeit spelled slightly differently)? On the Playback box-set. That one I liked. This one here doesn’t really take off. Not a really great melody, either.

 

Burnt Out Town – Reminds me a bit of Mark Knopfler’s Privateering album. Would have fit on there. Which is a good thing. I like Privateering very much. But I get the feeling I can’t say the same of Hypnotic Eye.

 

Shadow People – Also almost no melody here. Two, no, wait, three notes! But boy, WHAT A SONG! Maybe Tom finally gets where he’s tried to get to in all those previous songs, maybe here he finally manages to say what he wants to say. To me, Shadow People definitely is the standout track on Hypnotic Eye. It’s nice what the Hearbreakers can do as musicians, all those riffs and fills and stuff. But we already know that. And isn’t that a bit more for the stage anyway? On record, less is more, and Shadow People perfectly proves that. If they played less, there would be dead silence. And still they create a certain place, a town, more than that, a complete world populated by those spooky shadow people we all know. And Tom, the old hippy, God bless his soul, addresses things directly: He is speaking of today, he is speaking of war. And he hopes that one day there will be no shadow at all.

 

As much as I miss Petty the folkie and his country-tinged romantic songs (acoustic guitars! There’s not one acoustic-based song on Hypnotic Eye… but that’s just me), tracks like Fault Lines and Shadow People make up for the loss. However, for the next album I really wish they let go of those bluesy riffs. I like rock. I like blues (some of it). But that kind of blues-rock I don’t understand.

 

I don’t know, maybe in a year or so I will be the greatest fan of Hypnotic Eye there is! :lol: Time can do some strange things, especially to records and your listening habits. But at the moment, I don’t think I will revisit the cold black-and-white world of Hypnotic Eye too often. Save for Shadow People, of course.

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didn’t they say this was supposed to be a rock’n’roll album?

Interesting to read your take on this! Thanks for sharing those thoughts, despite of seemingly having minority taste buds on the issue. :)

 

Of course, I respectfully, yet radically, disagree with your overall view on the album. Still I think I really share your key analysis - your defined "problems", as it were: This is not the album it was said to be. Not the album that was hyped or described in various media outlets, cuts and quotes taylored to fly well with the pre-released songs and thus built wild expectation.

 

To me personally though, as much as I would love to hear TPATH do a 70s smoking set of songs, or at least the promised album with a straight through rocking punsch, at this stage of the game, in the real world, I really think Hypnotic Eye is close to the perfect effort. That is, to me the problem you hint at is real and a big one - it's all the talking well beside any actual point, making comparisions that just briefly turn out to be anything else than hard to understand and quite bizarr. In fact I did have some similar issues with Mojo (since that record turned out to be - if pretty good as it is - less than half the deep down gritty blues album it was marketed to be). But the hype building for Hypnotic Eye really makes the side mouthed selling of Mojo seem like pretty spot on, after all. This time I really think they (and/or the label) have bs:ed us quite well, in terms of what was to be expected. 

 

Only thing is - hearing the album now, over and over, I'm really glad they made the record differently from the talking, cause I think Eye is an awesomely organic and well sounding mix in terms of song writing and arrangements (and for most parts production) - and as sweet the album they have been talking about would be.. I am afraid that, for a bunch of old timers recording in 2014, such an album is pure imagination. I think I kinda realised that when I heard what they did instead. I guess that means I like a few of the songs a lot more than you do, but that's another issue all together. With one or two  minor detail exceptions, where things seems really pasted on, I just don't find the album at all cold or black and white. Quite the opposite actually. I find it mostly warm and alive. (And I haven't even heard the real vinyl verion yet!!)

 

Sure, I find Burned Out Town - despite a few good lyrics to it's merit, to be a total miss. Off target stylewise, for this specific album. Something to the same effect could be said about Power Drunk, I suppose. If less obvious. Moreover, like I've mentioned elsewhere, I find Red River to be much better understood as a Mudcrutch song and I do find it a little "strange" in this set, emotionally. But like you say, that's just me. And it's still a really good song.

 

A lot of the rest of Eye is straying far and in many directions from what I'd come to expect, but I find myself really loving it, nevertheless! To me, now there is a close call to what is the best TP&TH song in at least two decades: All You Can Carry, Shadow People, Sins of My Youth, Fault Lines, American Dream Plan B, U Get Me High (despite stupid title) all beats all other songs TP penned since 1995. Red River, Forgotten Man and Full Grown Boy may fall just short of that level of extreme quality. And the album would likely have benefited (and reach full legendary status) from replacing the remaining two with something more... in line with the album. I guess you've got a point. Still, to me this is legendary enough. I believe there is a possibilty that time will prove Eye to be in the top 3 of all time best TP&HB records. To me.

 

---

 

And again.. I have to ask.. Does anyone know for sure? Did I missunderstand something, or is there really no back-up singing from Scott or Ben on all of the album?? Wtf? Much of this album just cries out for cool back up arrangements, and all I hear, save Ryan once, is layers of TP?? That really would give the appreciation I otherwise feel towards the production, a bit of an aura of pointlessness, really. How lame.

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I think it was miscast as a throwback to the first two albums.

 

It is unique in Petty's catalog.  I think they just couldn't think of a better marketing angle.

 

Too bad that public relations firms feel the need to invent a story to go along with each album.

 

Not every album is a concept.  The Last DJ and maybe She's The One are Tom's only such albums.

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Shelter, thank you very much for tolerating my opinion.  :)  I really do feel I'm a total minority in not liking the album. But that's fine. Even the German Rolling Stone, usually not too crazy about Petty, chose Hypnotic Eye as their album of the month in August and call the Heartbreakers the best American band. I GUESS I'M JUST TOTALLY NOT GETTING SOMETHING VERY ESSENTIAL HERE! :lol: But this, as I said, may of course change with time.

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Man, really? Better than any other American band? What a complement! Go German Rolling Stone!

 

Ok, so does anyone else think that crazy beat on Fault Lines is Tom finally succeeding at mimicking the drive of the ol' Fleetwood Mac "Oh Well"?? I read somewhere that he'd been trying to do that. I bet that's where that one came from - to total success I might add.

 

I agree with you guys about the few issues with the album. Red River is just a weird one for me. U Get Me High - bet they spelled it that way just to differentiate (same issues with Dog on the Run and Dogs on the Run, the former which is amazing and the later not so much). Regardless of spelling it feels a bit meh. I know other people like it though.

 

As for me, I like blues and jazz influences on this album apparent in Full Grown Boy and Burnt Out Town. Sometimes I think Tom probably feels a bit sorry for these music styles which are very much the underdog at the moment. I think they're great but that people have just stopped being used to them.. it's clear they won't sit well with some people. 

 

TwoGunslingers is spot on about Shadow People - the imagery in that captures perfectly the feeling of living among masses of strangers and being so dependent on their whims and whether they go crazy or not. Good song. I think the imagery is also spot on in All You Can Carry and Fault Lines. There is some really good writing on this album if not catchy writing per say. I've started singing spontaneously to All You Can Carry and Fault Lines but that's all so far. That's my test haha.

 

Overall, I think this album sits well with me. I first started listening to Tom when I was 13 and have done so now almost religiously for over 10 years so I think I've been able to grow with his eclectic music style. If you listen to Buried Treasure then I think everything on here is recognizable as something that Tom would like. No surprises really. 

 

On a side note, I've just put on the Mudcrutch album now - which initially I wasn't that big a fan of, but I'm really loving it. No doubt if you don't like recent effort it will grow in time.

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'Hypnotic Eye' is never gonna be far from my cd player.  It is strong, with well-worded, poetic lyrics and rich, complex, stunning guitar work that takes me to another level.  'All You Can Carry', 'American Dream Plan B', and 'Red River' just make my soul dance... I've enjoyed listening to them, paying attention to the beautiful bits that make the whole, making guesses as to who and what guitar make this tone and that riff.  What pure pleasure!  I must say the band as a whole is beyond words: Ron, Steve, Benmont, Scot, they are simply wonderful.

 

Well done, guys.  You've blessed the heart of this little Southern gal.

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i've heard three or four songs so far and I think its great.

 

What I love is the relatively unproduced sound of a GREAT band in a room playing together, lots of room for each instrument and the guitar tones are so good you can smell the warm tubes in a Fender amp cabinet!

 

Most what I like is Forgotten Man and You Get Me High.  

 

They give Ron Blair lots of room to play his great loping, melodic lines, and all that cool stuff he does up the neck.  On the earlier records, this kind of playing was critical the the sound of the Heartbreakers, and Blair and Lynch would lock in just a little behind the beat, with Ron playing a lot of counter point stuff. 

 

I think this got lost with Petty's change in the type of music he wrote, starting with his solo stuff and with Blair leaving.  Maybe one reason why Ron left? 

 

Ron is a rock bass guitar player.  I hope I hear more of him on other cuts on the new record.

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And again.. I have to ask.. Does anyone know for sure? Did I missunderstand something, or is there really no back-up singing from Scott or Ben on all of the album?? Wtf? Much of this album just cries out for cool back up arrangements, and all I hear, save Ryan once, is layers of TP?? That really would give the appreciation I otherwise feel towards the production, a bit of an aura of pointlessness, really. How lame.

That's what I wanted to comment on and forgot: Not only does nobody else seem to sing, I hardly hear Benmont's piano. Or organ.

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      (* unclear lyric)
       
      Gotta image of angels
      And not in a man Swip'n a ruler 'cross my little boy hand Now I turn around Sixty 'witches on my hand I'm still throw'in up some other food my mind has fed*   Hounded*, I've had enough Hounded*, my time has come I'm fed up, fed up, fed up We're playin' dumb   Well lets light a candle for every kid For every soul that was done away with For every confession that wasn't on the level For every man of God who lives with hidden devils   Hounded*, I've had enough Hounded*, my time has come I'm fed up, fed up, fed up We're playin' dumb, ... dumb, dumb, dumb   You live in a mansion with drivers and go-fers You walk* down the hallway with red letter loafers This may not be your fault, but **** How can you know all that you know and get to sleep   Hounded*, I've had enough Hounded*, my time has come I'm fed up, fed up, fed up We're playin' dumb, ... yah we're playin' dumb dumb, dumb, dumb dumb, dumb, dumb dumb...dumb, dumb, dumb, dumb dumb, dumb, dumb dumb, dumb, dumb, dumb, dumb, dumb
    • By WreckMeBaby
      Anybody want to discuss what we have for guitar chords for Hypnotic Eye so far? I have been able to jam along to a few songs. 
       
      Let's start a thread and see who has what figured out - I really want to play Fault Lines but can't get the chord structure right. I have some ideas for American Dream Plan B, Power Drunk and U Get Me High. 
       
      Anyone else busting out the guitar and trying to jam along? 
    • By NightDriver
      When I listen to Highway Companion, I always get the feeling that Saving Grace just isn't the right choice for first song. I always get the feeling that Square One (no. 2 on the album) should have been song no. 1. Saving Grace with its powerful roadhouse blues sound just doesn't seem to fit into the album at all. So the conclusion I come to is this: Tom presents a new album to the record company people, they listen to it and have their say. I could imagine that in the case of "Highway Companion" they thought the album in its entirety was too mellow. They needed a rocking tune for a new album by rock icon Tom Petty. So Tom went back to the drawing board and created Saving Grace (or dug it out of the archives).   Same thoughts appear when I contemplate Hypnotic Eye. American Dream Plan B is the album's opener. But does it prepare the listener for what will follow? I don't think so. To me, ADPB is the weakest of the five early releases of Hypnotic Eye, and the most mainstream one. On the album it is followed by Fault Lines, which in my opinion is the perfect way to start an album the band describes as a "a nod to the 60s". Both Fault Lines and the following Red River are very complex songs and have unusual spacy bridges. I can imagine the record company people thought so too and demanded a rocking opener a little more mainstream.   I'm curious if anybody else feels this way too.
    • By NightDriver
      Uncut article on Hypnotic Eye pg3
    • By NightDriver
      Uncut article on Hypnotic Eye pg2
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