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  1. Yesterday
  2. ^ Aren't we all? I don't know how many times I've purchased the same Beatles release on vinyl or CD as they repackage/remaster again and again. But the latest Sgt. Pepper is frickin' great. I'd do the same for Tom Petty if we could get "all the rest" and outtakes, and so on.
  3. I have everything on vinyl and CDs except for those news sets that came out on the officials. Too expensive! I have quite a bit of it on digital too. In order to get the special tracks offered on iTunes I had to buy the entire album again on the later albums. I always buy the remixed re-issues too! I'm a sucker buying the same music over and over again!! LOL!
  4. Classic Rock Video of the Day II

    8/20/17 The Everly Brothers
  5. Last week
  6. Classic Rock Video of the Day II

    8/19/17 The Rolling Stones
  7. Emitt Rhodes

    Great stuff! A genius of a man that.
  8. Emitt Rhodes

    Check this out, it's just the beginning. Research and you'll like it even more. Oh yeah, listen to his music too!!!!! https://web.musicaficionado.com/main.html?utm_source=email&utm_campaign=WeeklyRecommendations#!/article/why_emitt_rhodes_was_the_one_man_beatle_by_jimfarber
  9. Photo of the Day Part III

  10. Full Moon Fever Reissue

    How about a release that's all the unused tracks collected together, leave the original records alone.
  11. Full Moon Fever Reissue

    I've got to say the Talking Heads re-issue of "stop making sense" is a prime example of a re-release / re-mix missing the mark. I loved the cassette version of that album and played it for years. Was excited to get the CD some years later and was utterly disappointed to see the tracks were different and some of the original mixes were replaced with new versions. I dont know why Tom and the boys cant release some of the CDs with bonus content like a lot of other artists have with live and alternate cuts placed at the end. I've been dying or a Wildflowers All the rest for a couple of years now...
  12. Classic Rock Video of the Day II

    8/18/17 Rare Version Hello Goodbye
  13. I also love a good musician biography or auto-biography and I've got a bunch. If I had to pick my favorite, it would be "This Wheel's On Fire" Levon Helm and the story of The Band'. Couldn't put that one down. I should read it again myself. It's been a while.
  14. ^ Yes, me too! Great post and great thread. Love the history aspects that book has to offer! There's so many good ones! I think I have briefly addressed this subject elsewhere, but, again running the risk of repeating myself, I would, off the top of my head have to mention Nick Tosches' Hellfire (the deeply fascinating and somewhat disturbing story of Jerry Lee Lewis). Tosches also, around the same time, that is the early 80s, wrote a cool book called Unsung Heroes of Rock 'n' Roll: The Birth of Rock in the Wild Years Before Elvis. It's not as good a read, but the content is mindblowing, never the less, if a bit beside the point here, since it's not a biography, strictly speaking. Obviously, some of the later editions of Clinton Heylin's Behind The Shades (about Bob Dylan) are to be highly recommended. And.. speaking of Heylin (and of the old ways of doing things), I would like to recommend most titles by Heylin, and most titles by Greil Marcus. Whether those guys cover a specific artist in biographies, or (as is often the case with Marcus) discuss certain angles on culture/music history, they are generally very entertaining and educational. In that genre of music history titles that are not biographies, one should also not forget Eric Lott's Love & Theft (yep, I think Dylan borrowed that one!).. or why not Woody Guthrie's Bound for Glory, for a fascinating glance down the vortex of the dust bowl past of the midwest and beyond. But I derail.
  15. Thanks, I enjoy reading about the history of all music, it's amazing at how they did things back then.
  16. I always love getting my teeth into a good musician biography...authorised or unauthorised (the latter usually hits home a bit more truthfully) Hank Williams - I Saw The Light biography by Colin Escott.....fascinating read on the music industry and how they worked releases/the business model used at the time to promote artists. Musicians could actually make a lot of money from Jukebox plays back in the late 40's....albums were used as a means to cobble together some out takes that weren't top drawer, Billboard singles chart was King, and getting the popular artists of the day to cover your song was a great way to rake in the royalty payments (particularly if you were a ''hillbilly country artist)...the cost to the industry from the change from 78's to 45's, the studio band costs, the fall out from the musicians union strike. That's before you even look at Hank Williams and his life.....died at 29, just before the first wave of rock and roll....a great read...a very detailed read at that....the sheer detail may put some people off the book but if you're into that type of thing and the history of music...and even have a passing interest in Hank Williams this would be worth checking out. Anyone have any other recommendations.......
  17. 2017 Tour Trail - memories, pics, songs played

    Interesting points. Make a lot of sense, right. Thanks for sharing! As for that article.. it may just be me, but it seems to imply a paradox of sorts. Here are the underlying observations - from Baltimore, of all places! - of what can be read as a white, supposedly resentful, maybe bitter, perhaps Trump supporting crowd, all digging TP for his unique voice (both as a lyricist and an actual voice), identyfying with his songs, thinking he tells their story, longing back to better days. Yet, while lots of statements and catchy and clever one liners can be found in TP songs, the lot of them are of a mostly general, perhaps philosophical reflextions type, aphorisms if you like. Lyrical tidbits and atmospheres that many people, for many different reasons can relate to and appreciate for their insight, beauty or pure entertainment value. ("If you don't run, you rust." "Most things I worry about, never happen anyway".) On a strictly ethnic, religious, economic, environmental - or generally political - level, I'd say that most things found inside the life work of TP writing, would/should be rather counter instinctive messages to a following like the one so sneakily hinted at in the article. He may agree some things were better in the past, but what things and for what reasons are other things worse today? Well, that is another matter. See, TP may be conservative, on a practical, nostalgia hued level - those were the days when people heard rock music on the radio, bought records and could actually sit down and focus enough to listen to it. And so on. He may be on about morals too, yeah, the brighter and darker sides in all of us. However. It's obvious that the message of Shadow People is deeper and more complex, when he sings of someone that "carries a gun" for his country, it's not exactly pure undisguised praise. It's not the right type of pride being voiced here, am I right? It's not a song of returning to the wild west ethos of the past. ("What are we fighting for?") Or a song sponsored by the NRA. Rather, this may be a song supposed to say something more general about fear, fear in individuals and fear in our society, and that an augmented isolation, greed, racism, alienation, moral relativism, sectarianism, violence and ultimately just more fear in society will not lead to a good future. This may be politcs, by all means, but not exactly the type of politics the white resentful shadow people out there in front of the stage (as mentioned in the article), would necessarily like it to be. As for Burned Out Town - too bad he didn't play that one in Baltimore! That is arguebly less complex and more straight messaged - saying a lot of things that would sting rather than arouse any believer in a country run by Trump logic and Trump economics. It may be the case that TP has got his very own case of "Born In The USA" here, where people just hear what they want to hear and make asses of themselves in the process. Ok, some songs or lines can be literally taken to mean anything or stand for all kinds of worldviews and politcal agendas (case in point - I Won't Back Down, a song so lyrically universal that it's pointless, and brilliant), but in most cases there is an underlying moral current and direction that just can't be hijacked any old way. At least that's how I see it. So, basically, what I'm saying here, and what I find to be the paradox of the article - to the extent that it's on to something, in the first place (which is probably without a doubt) - is the deep irony of how all these "ordinary" people, supposedly grooving to the message of TP songs, are really not the "forgotten men" they identify with. Rather they are the "forgetting men", forgetting to listen, forgetting to think and, if we are lucky, forgetting to act. Meanwhile, somewhere in Baltimore, out in the cold, holding their hands out, over a fire in a can - to paint a somwhat pathetically symbolic and pun-reaking picture - there are the non TP fan, but let's quickly forget who that may be and why, shall we. Besides, how could someone like that even afford the ticket? The article writer must surely be delusional to forget to take that into consideration. Let's just pity the Petty audience pity itself, shall we. A pitiful sentence, that. And a pitiful task. Seriously. To end this essay. TP may not, by a long shot, be as outspoken "protester" as was Bob Dylan in 1963, but he may also not be all that fitting as an idol for people and forces that I think that New Yorker article hits at, innocent and steeped in nostalgia as they are, deliberatly or not. I am not sure, actually, whether the article is meant to be praise, reflection or if it rather falls bluntly into a category that may be called "guilt by association".. I'm not sure, but I think it may be a bit rich and a bit off the mark. Now, how that for spending time, energy (and words!) on the TP community? Morally or politcally, you may find me dubious. But you can't say I don't try.
  18. 2017 Tour Trail - memories, pics, songs played

    I have a hard time agreeing with this statement too, but I don't totally disagree with it. Funny, it reminds me of how so many people saw Bob Dylan's early music as a sort of "voice of the people," as protest songs, etc... Yet, he totally denied most of it and refused to play at sort of rally/protests. I think there are a lot of TP songs that can be interpreted as frustration with the socio-political climate. And I don't just mean the obvious Last DJ stuff. From the early stuff to the current stuff. Possibly anything from "Anything that's Rock and Roll"... to "Forgotten Man," "Shadow People," and "Burnt Out Town." I recall an interview about Hypnotic Eye where Tom commented on how it seemed his songs were lyrically leaning to something darker and more cynical, but he reassured that notion by saying that the current time in his life was more relaxed and hopeful. I think, in most of his lyrics, there's a balanced amount of hope and cynicism, positive energy and frustration. Do I think that the more cynical songs are "American Grievance Rock"? No. Do I think the writer of this article was reaching for something unique? Yeah, probably.
  19. 2017 Tour Trail - memories, pics, songs played

    I have a hard time agreeing with this statement too, but I don't totally disagree with it. Funny, it reminds me of how so many people saw Bob Dylan's early music as a sort of "voice of the people," as protest songs, etc... Yet, he totally denied most of it and refused to play at sort of rally/protests. I think there are a lot of TP songs that can be interpreted as frustration with the socio-political climate. And I don't just mean the obvious Last DJ stuff. From the early stuff to the current stuff. Possibly anything from "Anything that's Rock and Roll"... to "Forgotten Man," "Shadow People," and "Burnt Out Town." I recall an interview about Hypnotic Eye where Tom commented on how it seemed his songs were lyrically leaning to something darker and more cynical, but he reassured that notion by saying that the current time in his life was more relaxed and hopeful. I think, in most of his lyrics, there's a balanced amount of hope and cynicism, positive energy and frustration. Do I think that the more cynical songs are "American Grievance Rock"? No. Do I think the writer of this article was reaching for something unique? Yeah, probably.
  20. This is true. I have so many bootlegs! Haha. I don't know why, but I never got around to getting many TP CDs. I have the Greatest Hits, but it's so scratched up. I have the first two albums on CD, then the deluxe edition of Damn the Torpedoes... along with Mojo and Hypnotic Eye. That's it, I think. (Other than the Live Anthology). I think I have a Wilbury CD or two. I often burn my digital downloads to CDs though so I can have them in the car. (No Aux input).
  21. 2017 Tour Trail - memories, pics, songs played

    Grievance or not, by whom and for what, tonight another leg of this tour will be kicked off (what?!) and here's hoping it will be an exciting and fun one and that we'll see lots of activity in the TPATH community in the upcoming weeks!
  22. 1). Digital 2.) LPs 3.) CDs No tapes/streaming... but I do own one of their giant Laser Discs, LOL. I was pretty broke when I became a fan, so I recorded recordings and saved them. Eventually I replaced these with MP3s of the actual tracks. I have all of their music on my external hard drive... but when I listen to TP, I almost always go to the Live Anthology. I started collecting the LPs a couple years after I became a fan. I think I have all of the albums except Echo, Wildflowers, She's the One, Last DJ, and Hypnotic Eye. I currently don't have a turntable or speakers, so they just sit in storage. Funnily enough, I listen to Amazon Prime Music almost exclusively now, unless I want to listen to old MP3 downloads I have through Google Play Music. I don't even use Pandora or Spotify. I love Amazon Prime Music. I just listen to the basic one that comes with my Prime subscription. I don't pay for the extra music. Someday, I'd love to have an awesome stereo system to listen to my LPs on.
  23. What do you need to do today?

    Yardwork yesterday and today. Cut grass yesterday and just did weedwacking today. Taking a short break and then go back out to trim bushes in front of the house. When I get that done and clean up the mess, I just might go back out and mount 2 flag poles on the front of the house. I bought 2 - 3 foot by 5 foot flags, 1 the USA flag and 1 Italian flag. I'm going to put the flag pole mounts at the same height, but the American flag will go on a 6 foot pole and the Italian flag on a 5 foot pole. That way the American flag will fly the highest. I'd really like to get this all done today, cuz it's supposed to rain tomorrow. Other than that, I have to go to the neighbors wedding Friday and have a mini family reunion Saturday and then an Italian Fest Sunday in my mom's old neighborhood. Christ you know it ain't easy, I need a rest just thinking about it!!!!!
  24. Which format do you own the most Petty music on?

    to split hairs a bit... but you don't "own" the bootlegs... so the most owned/purchased would be CDs!
  25. Classic Rock Video of the Day II

    8/16/17 George Harrison sings Bob Dylan
  26. Digital downloads by far. I have all of the CD's, but the bootlegs way outnumber the official releases, and those were mostly downloads.
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